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In Silicon Valley, Cisco civil rights lawsuit could expose rampant caste prejudice against Dalits

Raphael

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https://thewire.in/caste/cisco-caste-discrimination-silicon-valley-dalit-prejudice
Networks of upper caste professionals work in tandem to keep out those they see as inferior.

San Francisco: Over 20 years ago, a student at the Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay figured that a classmate was a Dalit. The discovery was made when the student didn’t see the boy’s name on the general merit list, and so figured that he had been admitted to the prestigious institution via reservations, India’s affirmative action programme.

Decades later, when both men made it to the Silicon Valley headquarters of the tech multinational Cisco, the “upper” caste staffer carried the knowledge of the other man’s “lower” caste with him and even passed on the information to colleagues at work. Last week, Sundar Iyer, the man who “outed” the other man’s caste, found himself at the centre of a civil rights lawsuit filed by the California government, which accused Iyer, his colleague Ramana Kompella and Cisco itself of unlawful employment practices.

While the lawsuit is the culmination of years of investigations, it couldn’t have come at a more significant time. While caste discrimination has never been a major public issue in the US, the lawsuit comes at a moment when the country is confronting racial discrimination, giving the Cisco case a sharper edge.

A number of Dalits in US tech companies point to the irony of their casteist colleagues supporting Black Lives Matter while continuing to suppress Indians from so-called lower castes.

While caste discrimination among Indians in US workplaces is not new, tech companies largely ignored the practise, primarily because, in strictly legal terms, it is not unlawful.

A Dalit person contracted with an American multinational told The Wire that his offer letter talked of not allowing for discrimination on the basis of race or religion, but made no mention of caste. When he broached the subject with human resources (HR), he was told that the offer letter was for all geographies and that caste was not a global issue. Ironically, he says that even Indian MNCs in the US issue offer letters mentioning race and not caste.

California’s lawsuit will now make it hard for companies to ignore caste as a discriminatory practice. While the US has no specific law against the Indian caste system, the California Department of Fair Employment and Housing filed the lawsuit against Cisco using a section of America’s historic Civil Rights Act. The Act is an outcome of the movement led by African Americans in the 1960s to end oppression and segregation.

The lawsuit accuses Cisco of violating Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, which makes it unlawful to discriminate on the basis of religion, ancestry, national origin/ethnicity and race/colour. The company is also charged with violating California’s Fair Employment and Housing Act. The lawsuit calls Cisco’s actions willful, malicious, fraudulent, and oppressive.

More than 90% of Indian immigrants to the US are from the upper castes, says the lawsuit, adding that the complainant, John Doe (a pseudonym widely used in American litigation) was the only Dalit in a team of upper caste Indians.

When contacted, Cisco spokesperson Robyn Blum sent The Wire an official statement, which says, “Cisco is committed to an inclusive workplace for all. We have robust processes to report and investigate concerns raised by employees which were followed in this case dating back to 2016, and have determined we were fully in compliance with all laws as well as our own policies. Cisco will vigorously defend itself against the allegations made in this complaint.”

Meanwhile, the lawsuit against Cisco paints a picture of an anything-but-robust system to deal with caste.

The case against Cisco

In October 2016, two colleagues informed John Doe, a principal engineer at Cisco, that his supervisor, Sundar Iyer, had told them that he (Doe) was from the “Scheduled Castes” and had made it to the Indian Institute of Technology via affirmative action. “Iyer was aware of Doe’s caste because they attended IIT at the same time,” said the case.

The suit says that, when confronted by Doe, Iyer denied having disclosed his caste.

In November 2016, Doe contacted Cisco’s HR over the matter. Within a week of doing so, Iyer reportedly informed Doe he was taking away Doe’s role as lead on two technologies. Iyer also removed team members from a third technology that Doe was working on and reduced his role to that of an independent contributor and he was isolated from his colleagues, the lawsuit says. In December 2016, Doe filed a written complaint with HR on the matter.

He also complained that Iyer had made discriminatory comments about a Muslim job applicant.

According to the suit, Cisco employee relations manager Brenda Davies’s investigation notes on the case showed evidence of caste-based discrimination, and yet she closed the case on the grounds that caste discrimination was not unlawful. The lawsuit says that her investigation notes even have Iyer admitting to outing his colleague’s caste by saying he was not on the “main list” at IIT.

The case says that Doe, who was further isolated and repeatedly harassed at work, called for a re-investigation. HR official Tara Powell reopened the investigation in April 2017. In a damning indictment of Cisco, California government investigations show that, despite employees telling Powell that Doe was being treated unfairly though he was technically competent, that Iyer was trying to push Doe out of the company, and that witnesses feared retaliation from Iyer if they spoke out against him, Powell closed the investigation on grounds that she could not substantiate any caste-based discrimination against Doe.

In February 2018, when Kompella became the interim head of engineering for Cisco’s team after Iyer stepped down, the lawsuit said he continued to “discriminate, harass, and retaliate against Doe by….giving him assignments that were impossible to complete under the circumstances.”

“Cisco’s training was deficient in that it did not adequately train managerial employees on workplace discrimination, harassment, and retaliation, nor did the company prevent, deter, remedy, or monitor casteism in its workforce,” says the lawsuit.

A 2018 report on caste in the US by Equality Labs, an Ambedkarite South Asian organisation, found that 67% of Dalits reported being treated unfairly at their workplaces. The report was cited in the lawsuit against Cisco. “The Cisco case is the tip of the iceberg. It is not an isolated case of harassment by an employer, but the symptom of a much deeper malaise,” Thenmozhi Soundararajan, Dalit rights activist and executive director of Equality Labs told The Wire.

The detailed harassment documented in the lawsuit gives a clue why more people do not complain of caste discrimination.

The lawsuit reminded Raj, a former Cisco employee, of all the instances of casteism that he faced but did not document over the last 20 years at tech companies in American, because he never thought caste discrimination would be taken seriously. Raj is not his real name. Like most Dalit engineers that The Wire spoke to, he wishes to remain anonymous.

In the interest of career growth, he largely avoided working with Indians. “I did have one Indian-American boss, but since he did not grow up in India, he was very liberal and I had no problems with him,” says Raj.

Mohan, another Dalit techie, never experienced caste-based discrimination at work over the past 16 years in the US. This is because he never had an Indian boss. Those who did have Indian bosses found that revealing their views on caste could adversely impact their career, and sometimes even cost them their jobs.

Samir was once unable to hold back from expressing his views on caste at work. “At the time, I was a top performer at work. One day, a client mentioned the Indian caste system in a meeting. My upper caste boss tried to defend the caste system, saying it was actually good for India. I couldn’t control myself, and blurted out that while he may be upper caste, for us lower castes, the caste system was a curse.”

Samir says his appraisal was impacted by the revelation of his caste, his rating in the company slipped and he was transferred out of the US, to the company’s Indian office. “In a matter of minutes, everyone at work got to know my caste,” he says.

Many Dalits said that once a person’s caste was made public, the word spread rapidly through close-knit upper caste networks.

Samir, who went to the same IIT as Sunder Iyer and John Doe, said that he was ragged the moment he stepped into the hostel on account of his caste. The discrimination he faced in US tech companies was like a throwback to his college days.

Soundararajan of Equality Labs repeatedly points out that caste discrimination isn’t about isolated instances of an employee and manager. “Dalit employees are dealing with upper caste networks that operate across companies and share information with each other. So Dalits fear not only retribution from one person or company, but from an entire network that cuts across companies, severely affecting career prospects. These networks form a virtual noose around Dalits, throttling their potential to rise in their careers,” she says.

Vijay, (not his real name), an upper caste techie who is anti-caste, has first-hand knowledge of exclusionary upper caste networks. “Many of these closed upper caste groups were formed in Indian colleges, and remained so even after moving to the US. I used to be in a college WhatsApp group that was a sanitised savarna echo chamber,” he adds.

Vijay, who formerly worked with Microsoft, recalls being on an email discussion forum for Indians, which, in 2006, suddenly went from bashing reservations to bashing lower caste people, who, they claimed, don’t send their children to school. He says the forum even talked of eugenics, claiming upper caste people were genetically superior at intellectual work while lower castes were good at physical work.

He says a Dalit co-worker complained to the company HR, which shut down the forum. Eventually, even when it reopened, it was always supervised by the Microsoft HR department, he says.

How Dalits are ‘vetted’ for work

It’s little wonder, then, that many Dalits do not want to reveal their caste at work. But, of course, this does not prevent the upper castes from trying to find out. While some last names immediately give away a person’s caste, many don’t. So Dalits find themselves being constantly probed to reveal their caste.

One common way Indians is to figure a person’s caste out is by inviting them for Hindu religious worship sessions, such as the satyanarayan katha, at a temple. Raj declined such an invitation from a Brahmin colleague. “At the time he did not know my caste,” says Raj. He says the Brahmin then patted him on the back in a seemingly casual gesture, but one that he felt was actually meant to check whether he was wearing a janeu, a ‘sacred thread’ worn by the dwija castes. “Once he figured my caste out, he immediately stopped socialising with me. Dinner invitations stopped too.”

Mohit was used to questions about his caste being posed in India. His last name, which ends in “kar” does not immediately give away caste. In India, he was often asked whether he was a “kar” as in Tendulkar (a Brahmin) or “kar” as in [Dr B.R.] Ambedkar.

In the US, questions can be less direct. Four years ago, at a corporate lunch in New York, soon after receiving a high position at an MNC, Mohit was munching on chicken tandoori when an upper caste senior executive expressed surprise that he was not vegetarian. Vegetarianism, long associated with upper caste purity, is often used to figure a person’s caste out. Over time, Mohit has learned how best to answer such questions. “I said that I would eat anything that moved, but my parents were vegetarian.” In other words, he was suggesting that he was born into a Brahmin family. While this is untrue – he is a Dalit and his parents are not vegetarians – it’s a lie he repeats for the sake of his career.

“After grappling with an oppressive caste system, it can be traumatic for Dalits to be surrounded by assertive upper castes, particularly when alone in a foreign country. While the caste system is prevalent in India, at least you have your family to support you there,” says Raj.

Maya Kamble (an alias she uses for communication), a tech employee on the US east coast, declined an invitation from a colleague to attend a Hindu religious worship session, saying she was Buddhist. Her colleague said nobody in India was ever born Buddhist, implying that Buddhists in India were largely lower caste Hindus converts. “My colleague was wrong about her assumption. I was born Buddhist. Both my parents converted to Buddhism before I was born,” she says.

This wasn’t the only time Kamble was reminded by her colleagues that she belonged to a caste once considered “untouchable”. One day at work, she found her manager struggling with a technical problem. “When I offered to help, my manager, who is upper caste, said I was jinxed, and should not touch the project as I was ill-fated.”

Shailaja Paik, associate professor of History at the University of Cincinnati, likens the modern-day expression of the centuries-old Indian caste system, to the mutation of a virus. At a time when the world is reeling from the coronavirus pandemic, she feels the caste system is an even more dangerous malaise – “a shape-shifting virus than travels across continents and mutates over time.”

Paik, who has extensively researched the oppression of Dalits, talks of the transnationalisation of caste, as Indians carry the baggage of caste across oceans, with dominant oppressor castes trying to recreate structures of power and privilege.

“Caste distinctions are deployed by Brahmins to frame their own merit and put down Dalits like John Doe as people who do not make it to the ‘main list’ at IIT and are from the ‘scheduled castes’, highlighting and emphasising that they (Brahmins) are inherently intelligent and superior while Dalits have less intellectual capacity,” says Paik, adding that the Cisco case in California is a direct replica of the caste hierarchies and inequalities prevalent at the IITs.

“When a Dalit like John Doe navigates the system, makes it to the IITs and even manages to get into Silicon Valley’s tech companies, he is still mocked for being someone who does not make it to the “main list”, and continues to be seen as inferior, just like his caste has historically been viewed. No matter what a Dalit does, it’s never enough,” says Paik.

Ashok, a former Cisco employee who grew up in the slums of India and made it to the same department at IIT as John Doe and Sundar Iyer, talks of just how rare it is for Dalits like himself to rise up the hierarchy and do well in life. Ashok wears a watch with Ambedkar on it. However, he does steer clear of conversations on caste with his superiors at work.

Anil Wagde, who also grew up in an Indian slum, recalls the time, in 2004, that he and other Dalits in Silicon Valley put up posters at Indian shops announcing celebrations for Ambedkar’s birth anniversary. “I refused to put my name on the poster for fear that people I worked with would get to know my caste, and would then respect me less,” he said. His fear came from the discrimination he had faced as a student in India. “The way roll calls were structured while taking attendance in college immediately gave away a person’s caste,” he said.

The financial cost of caste discrimination

Dalits talk of the opportunity cost of not being part of upper caste networks.

“Many companies fill vacant positions with internal referrals. Upper caste Indians have the first-mover advantage and misuse the system of internal referrals to fill posts with people from their caste. In addition to excluding Dalits, this system also excludes Blacks and other minorities,” says Raj. Dalits are often afraid to speak of harassment because of company peer review systems for appraisals and promotions.

While there is an abundance of anecdotal evidence on caste in the US, anti-caste organisations are increasingly aware of the need for more data on the subject. This was particularly evident in 2015, when Hindu groups in California lobbied for the removal of caste from California textbooks.

Dalit activists were locked in battle with Hindu groups at the time. “When we shared our stories with the California textbook board, officials told us that they believed our stories, but that we needed more than anecdotes of discrimination to prove our case,” says Soundararajan. This is what inspired Equality Labs to conduct its 2018 study on caste in the US. “We were able to map the anecdotal evidence to the data,” she says. The Equality Labs report was cited in the Cisco lawsuit and was used throughout the US to help American Human Rights commissions, immigration courts, domestic violence agencies, and Congress to understand caste discrimination.

The case is significant and will be landmark one to establish what the American legal system thinks counts as discrimination. It is being watched closely by Indian Americans in the tech business and could potentially have wide repercussions, at the very least making companies more aware of how they should modify HR practices to include such behaviour as a discriminatory.


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Carrying the baggage of your ancestral caste prejudice with you across international borders when you settle in a new homeland ― that's just repugnant. It seems you can take the Hindu out of India but ...
 

Bilal9

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These H1B's aren't just happy to get jobs stateside - they want to 'import' their Sanghi prejudices against minorities and Muslims in hiring practices in the US. Well - a swift kick in the butt back to India will be the result.

Sanghi rules don't work in the US. Time to pack your bags...
 

Gadkari

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@Soumitra, you still feel the Humanities should not be part of Indian technical education ?

@Gadkari ?
That article would have more credibility if the editor of the wire was not a Brahmin himself :lol:

Why does the brahmin editor of the wire not step down and give that job to a fellow Dalit ? :cheesy:

And yes, "humanities" study is a complete waste of time and resources.
 

jamahir

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That article would have more credibility if the editor of the wire was not a Brahmin himself :lol:

Why does the brahmin editor of the wire not step down and give that job to a fellow Dalit ? :cheesy:
It wasn't the editor's choice to be born into a Upper Caste family. He / She is doing good by propagating news of caste injustices out of India too. And read this :
Vijay, (not his real name), an upper caste techie who is anti-caste, has first-hand knowledge of exclusionary upper caste networks.
This is a noble person.

And yes, "humanities" study is a complete waste of time and resources.
It is such an anti-Humanities prejudice in the technical courses that has led to annual output of graduates who are mostly drones doing the work that the Americans won't prefer doing or ask for more salary. And it is such drones who carry Indian caste or religious biases to whichever other country they go to, like has been posted in the OP. These are the type of middle class drones who ignore migrant laborers dying of hunger at railway stations but feed stray dogs and bang eating plates to drive away Corona.
 
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Gadkari

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It wasn't the editor's choice to be born into a Upper Caste family. He / She is doing good by propagating news of caste injustices out of India too. And read this :
LOL.......... nobody choose to be born into an upper caste family :lol:

But since the wire is seeking that Dalits be employed in the same role as upper caste, then why is the wire not following its own advice and replacing their brahmin editor with a dalit one ? :lol:

That way this report will have SOME credibility.


This is a noble person.
How ? He did not even reveal his name so for all you know he could be a fictitious character :cheesy:

In fact the article only mentions the names of the upper caste men and all the dalits have factious names. :lol:


It is such an anti-Humanities prejudice in the technical courses that has led to annual output of graduates who are mostly drones doing the work that the Americans won't prefer doing or ask for more salary. And it is such drones who carry Indian caste or religious biases to whichever other country they go to, like has been posted in the OP. These are the type of middle class drones who ignore migrants dying of hunger at railway stations but feed stray dogs and bang eating plates to drive away Corona.
If you don't want prejudice, then create a meritocracy and remove "reservation" based on caste.

You can't have the cake and eat it too.




Now THIS is reality, No Fake names and "anonymous" sources.

Madan Ravichandran’s Explosive Insider Account Of How Periyarists, Communists Impose Ideological Hegemony In Tamil Media
byThe Commune-Jul 11, 2020 11:37 AM

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Snapshot
  • News Head of Channel Vision, Madan Ravichandran, who was earlier part of some of these mainstream media channels, has published a new video that provides an insider account of the modus operandi of Tamil media.

    In a short span of time, he has earned a formidable reputation as an irrepressible interviewer, who has posed probing questions to personalities across the ideological and political spectrum.

The mainstream media houses in Tamil Nadu like Puthiyathalaimurai, News 7, News 18 Tamil Nadu, which have been often accused of practising a policy of ideological hegemony and creating a narrative that is favourable to the Dravidar Kazhagam, Dravida Munnetra Kazhagam and Communists, are now facing backlash after two prominent social media personalities — Madan Ravichandran of Channel Vision and Youtuber Maridhas — published viral videos providing disturbing details of their operating model.

Popular vlogger and social media activist Maridhas released a video on 5 July exposing the nexus between journalists at News 18 Tamil Nadu and the DK, DMK and Communists.

He also shed light on a shadowy organisation called Centre of Media Persons for Change (CMPC) (www.cmpc.in), which appears to operate as a nodal point for the infiltration of communists, DK groups into the media.

Some of the persons associated with CMPC and content writers in news channels like News 18, and Puthiyathalaimurai trace their history to One Mind Generation Research run by Udhayanidhi Stalin (son of MK Stalin), Anbil Mahesh Poyyamozhi (son of former MLA and close confidante of MK Stalin Anbil Poyyamozhi), Mohan Karthik (son of current Anna Nagar MLA M.K. Mohan of DMK) and Sabareesan (son-in-law of MK Stalin).

In light of this, News Head of Channel Vision, Madan Ravichandran, who was earlier part of some of these mainstream media channels, has published a new video that provides an insider account of the modus operandi of Tamil media.

In a short span of time, Madan Ravichandran has earned a formidable reputation as an irrepressible interviewer, who has posed probing questions to personalities across the ideological and political spectrum.

In the video titled “Thidal Udaga Sombugalin Kadhai”, roughly translating to “The Story of Thidal (Periyar Memorial) Media Houses”, Madan Ravichandran traces the journey of his experience right from his recruitment to how he ended up doing what he is doing now.

He says that it has been his interest to work in the press by becoming a journalist in one of the mainstream media houses in Tamil Nadu, for which he is said to have undertaken a 3-month journalism course.

He says that he started applying for the roles of sub-editor and anchor in some of today’s well-known Tamil news channels and adds that he would clear the written test rounds but not pass the interview round.

He notes that during the interview, they test the ideological and political affiliations of one by asking “who is your favourite leader?”

Madan says that he answered “Netaji Subash Chandra Bose” in one and “Velupillai Prabhakaran” in another interview and both the times he failed to get the job.

He remarks that he just spent ₹500, which did the trick for him. He says he bought a T-shirt with E.V. Ramasamy Naicker (Periyar)’s photo and showed up in events attended by journalists of these media houses.

He notes that he had to create the impression that he was “Periyarist” and finally managed to land up in a news channel.

Upon entering, he found that there were several people who were working in that place who had bypassed the processes that he had to go through to get the job.

He says that one of them was a DMK MLA’s sister’s son and adds that there were many other people who had connections with the party or its affiliates.

Sometimes, persons who are of the same caste as that of the Editor are hired”, he says.

He says a commoner from a middle class background has to cross several hurdles to get the job in these media houses, but those with the party backing and its affiliates bypass all these process.

This, he says, is against Periyar’s ideals. He also says that it is an added advantage for candidates who apply for jobs in these outlets if they wear a Periyar T-shirt or take a photo at Periyar’s memorial.

He says that his life in the media took a turn after his interview with Dravida Kazhagam President K. Veeramani.

In that interview, Veeramani walks out after facing tough questions from Madan
. He mentions that there were hurdles in airing that interview.

He says that since then, he came to be identified as a “Sanghi”. He was discriminated at his workplace post that interview. In order to prove that he was not a ‘Sanghi’, he says that he interviewed Rangaraj Pandey, the CEO of Chanakyaa, who the DK, DMK and Communist folks identify as an ‘RSS person’.

He says that it is only then that the discrimination against him stopped.

He also mentions that religious sentiments are hurt and quotes an incident when he turned up at office with sacred ash on his forehead on Thaipoosam day and one ‘junior Maniammai’ and ‘junior Periyar’ passed a derogatory adult joke about it.

He said that he brushed it away, considering that they were atheist. However, the same people were playing servile to the owner of the channel by smearing sacred ash on their forehead when they found that he was a devotee of Lord Murugan.

After this, he had shifted to another channel, where during his interview, he was asked what his caste was.

“It was your people who made ‘that party and alliance’ lose right?”, the channel’s editor had supposedly asked Madan.

He had told Madan to not venture into any ‘revolution’ but dance to the tunes of the one party and their affiliates.

He got the job, but he faced frequent interventions from his boss. They had placed a video editor, who would edit out portions that would show the DMK, DK or the Communists in bad light.

This person was supposedly part of another news channel, who stole some tapes from there and joined this channel due to a tiff between those two media houses.

In one of the interviews with Velmurugan (Tamizhaga Vaazhvurimai Katchi leader), the latter had mentioned that Mr. Vaiko, the present Rajya Sabha MP, was put in jail and beaten during the DMK’s period.

This portion was edited out, fearing a backlash.

Madan asks if they are journalists or party men in disguise.

After this controversy, he was asked to do interviews with cinema stars. Even then, he was told to not touch topics about lyricist Vairamuthu of #MeToo fame who had sexually harassed singer Chinmayi Sripada.

Later, he shifted to another channel, where the owner had promised full freedom to him.

However, the Editor-in-Chief, Jen Ram, had cut his wings by restricting him only to YouTube. Ram had told Madan ‘to soft tread’.

After interviewing Aloor Sha Navas, the Deputy General Secretary of Viduthalai Chiruthaigal Katchi, the latter had apparently called the Editor-in-Chief and lashed out at Madan saying, “How dare that Sanghi fellow ask me such questions?”

Since this incident, Ram had asked Madan not to proceed with any interview without getting all aspects of the interview (the guests, questions, interview time, et cetera) vetted by him.

Madan asks if this is the freedom of expression that they stand for.

He was to interview former DMK MLA and DK ideologue Suba Veerapandian, who Madan says, he has huge respects for, considering the depth of his knowledge and his conduct.

But Ram did not allow it. Madan later approached WIN News’ owner, Devanathan, who gave the go-ahead to Madan. This interview became a huge hit on YouTube. Post this, the employees at WIN News who were part of Ram’s lobby had protested against Madan, by wearing black ribbons for his interview with Suba Vee.

Suba Vee had even posted in his Facebook handle that Madan had asked the right questions, but that it was Suba Vee who lost to him.

Madan asks, “Is this the neutrality that you preach? After Suba Vee, I interviewed H. Raja, where I had asked questions cornering him.”

At a later point in the video, he says he got branded as a ‘Tamil Nationalist’ for having Velupillai Prabhakaran’s photo on Maaveerar Day (November 27) and was kicked out of the particular news channel he was working with then, citing that “he won’t be able to mingle as they were going in a ‘different direction’”.

He says that, when he had invited Naam Tamilar Katchi’s (NTK) Kaliammal for a debate in his show, he was lashed out by the editor of the channel saying, “Do you think I am running a channel for promoting NTK?”

When the Pollachi murder and rape case happened, the editor of the channel that he was working with then, had asked to ‘sensationalise’ the issue, to trigger a protest like the Jallikattu protests.

He says that the editors’ lobby in the Tamil Nadu media had decided to focus on that particular issue to create a ‘favourable atmosphere’ for the DMK.

Madan also highlights how these news channels ‘balance’ the situations by having the non-DMK party members for special programmes about their personal journeys, interviews, etc.

He says that they exploit the desire of members belonging to smaller parties to get featured on TV, by inviting them for debates.

However, they are cornered by the moderator and other panelists during the debate to establish their supremacy.

He says that some of the parties will not speak out against this and rightly so because, then there would be accusations of “stifling of voices”.

Madan also takes a dig at social media personality and DMK mouthpiece Savukku Shankar as he had put out a tweet that said that Channel Vision has a person from ADMK investing in it.

He says that Savukku Shankar, who had once released highly confidential documents and tapes, has now come down to the level where he has to counter people like Madan.

He points out how Savukku Shankar, who was once smoking a ‘beedi and ordinary Scissors’ has changed now with the latter having an office near Gemini bridge in Chennai and in Nungambakkam, and wearing costly watches, and riding fancy bikes, etc after he started functioning as the mouthpiece of DMK.

Madan says that he is not smart enough like Shankar to earn like that.

Madan accepts that there is an investment from an ADMK person along with his own personal investments and from other friends and well-wishers not affiliated to any party.

However, they haven’t asked them to be favourable to them. Madan says that he had only one condition for getting investments for his Channel Vision venture — that the person should not have any ties with the DMK or its affiliates, because then, there would be stifling of his voice.

He ends by saying that he will continue to keep exposing the Tamil news channels and their hidden secrets.

“I have learnt the trade from you. Now I am going to do what you have been doing for years! It will be against you and the party you support!” Madan openly declares.

To questions on whether he will question the the ADMK, he says he will invite ADMK spokespersons for the debate and they will be grilled with questions the same way he has been doing so far.

However, he asks Savukku Shankar if he will ask the DMK chief MK Stalin and his son Udhayanidhi Stalin to come for a live show on his channel.

He also asks Savukku Shankar if he will be obliged to ask Puthiyathalaimurai’s Managing Editor, Karthigaichelvan, to conduct a debate on suicides happening in SRM College or News 18 Tamil Nadu’s M. Gunasekaran to debate on DK’s many dubious organisations.

Savukku Shankar, the DMK mouthpiece, did not condemn RS Bharathi’s comments over Dalits or Jagathrakshakan’s investments in Sri Lanka’s Hambantota to build an oil refinery.

He also takes a dig at how Savukku Shankar comments on others’ personal affairs (Recently, he made sexist comments on former TN Health Secretary Beela Rajesh). Madan said that he won’t stoop to such lows like him, but requested that he pay alimony to his divorced wife.

Savukku Shankar is believed to have been with the police, but many, however, say he was only a clerical staff who became famous after he exposed sensational documents pertaining to DMK’s corruption in the 2G spectrum case. He has, however, now taken a complete U-turn.

Madan says he is willing to face all the challenges thrown at him by Savukku Shankar through DMK or its allies.

He says he still has people ‘monitoring’ Savukku Shankar. “I have voice tapes that might help me in the future. Hope you understand,” he says in response to Savukku Shankar.

He also responds to his tweet about Madan Ravichandran wrongly mentioning about the Myalpore Jannal Baji shop owner’s death.

He apologises for the same as he got ‘misled’ by reports published in news agencies.

However, he questions Savukku Shankar when his friend M. Gunasekaran of News 18 Tamil Nadu will apologise for his crime of driving Naveena, a woman belonging to the Vanniyar caste, to suicide as it was after Gunasekaran sensationalised the issue that the young lady broke down and fell into depression and later died.

Family members of Naveena still accuse Gunasekaran of sensationalising the issue by conducting a debate on it.

Finally, he ends by saying that these are just a ‘few pages’ out of his diary and that ‘more is coming along’ and that he plans to bring out them in several episodes.

“After all, what will you do? You will make me run. I have been on the run. I am used to it. So, bring it on!”, Madan concludes.

On Friday, Channel Vision released a poster of “Madan Diary”.
 
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jamahir

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If you don't want prejudice, then create a meritocracy and remove "reservation" based on caste.

You can't have the cake and eat it too.
Firstly, the Reservations system hasn't worked fully which is why anti-Dalit exists even in so-called professional life. This exists in the same eco-system as Upper Caste shopkeepers in India washing coins after receiving them from a Dalit customer. Any solution has to account this.

Secondly, I agree that Meritocracy should prevail but anti-Dalit prejudice is removed.

So towards that we can have these methods :

1. All Dalits become Buddhist, like how late Rohith Vemula's mother, brother and sister did. And then hope for discrimination to end.

2. The Brahmins declare the Dalits to have become Brahmins once and for all, thus ending the primary basis ( birth ) for discrimination. But this will still retain the caste of priesthood from which many bad practices emerge.

3. All Dalits declare themselves to be irreligious and join progressive movements in India ( like the public communist parties ) which can influence things outside like approaching Western court systems to file anti-discrimination cases.

But since the wire is seeking that Dalits be employed in the same role as upper caste, then why is the wire not following its own advice and replacing their brahmin editor with a dalit one ? :lol:
I am sure if the Chief Editor of The Wire retires or leaves and a Dalit candidate is found he or she will be entrusted with the task.

How ? He did not even reveal his name so for all you know he could be a fictitious character :cheesy:
So you are saying that the whole story is bullshit ?
 

ColonelSanders

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LOL.......... nobody choose to be born into an upper caste family :lol:

But since the wire is seeking that Dalits be employed in the same role as upper caste, then why is the wire not following its own advice and replacing their brahmin editor with a dalit one ? :lol:

.
This is the stupidest thing i ever read anywhere
 

Gadkari

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This is the stupidest thing i ever read anywhere
And yet that is what the dalit in the article is demanding :cheesy:

That he be promoted because he is a dalit and not because he is qualified for the job. :lol:

Firstly, the Reservations system hasn't worked fully which is why anti-Dalit exists even in so-called professional life. This exists in the same eco-system as Upper Caste shopkeepers in India washing coins after receiving them from a Dalit customer. Any solution has to account this.

Secondly, I agree that Meritocracy should prevail but anti-Dalit prejudice is removed.

So towards that we can have these methods :

1. All Dalits become Buddhist, like how late Rohith Vemula's mother, brother and sister did. And then hope for discrimination to end.

2. The Brahmins declare the Dalits to have become Brahmins once and for all, thus ending the primary basis ( birth ) for discrimination. But this will still retain the caste of priesthood from which many bad practices emerge.

3. All Dalits declare themselves to be irreligious and join progressive movements in India ( like the public communist parties ) which can influence things outside like approaching Western court systems to file anti-discrimination cases.
Since you want to remove prejudice, why not start with prejudice against Black people, fat people, short people, ugly people, women, ugly women, people with handicap, people with illness, people with bad smell, stupid people, illiterate people and unqualified people.

Let me know when you can start and how soon you can complete this project.


I am sure if the Chief Editor of The Wire retires or leaves and a Dalit candidate is found he or she will be entrusted with the task.

Are you saying there are NO DALITS who are qualified to be the editor of Wire ? :lol:

Sounds like you hate Dalits :lol: .... shame on you. lol



So you are saying that the whole story is bullshit ?
Everything that comes out of the Wire is BS.
 

jamahir

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On Friday, Channel Vision released a poster of “Madan Diary”.
He says that since then, he came to be identified as a “Sanghi”. He was discriminated at his workplace post that interview. In order to prove that he was not a ‘Sanghi’, he says that he interviewed Rangaraj Pandey, the CEO of Chanakyaa, who the DK, DMK and Communist folks identify as an ‘RSS person’
Will this "Madan Diary" contain our "irrepressible" reporter asking probing questions to Sangh people ?
 

ColonelSanders

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And yet that is what the dalit in the article is demanding :cheesy:

That he be promoted because he is a dalit and not because he is qualified for the job. :lol:



Since you want to remove prejudice, why not start with prejudice against Black people, fat people, short people, ugly people, women, ugly women, people with handicap, people with illness, people with bad smell, stupid people, illiterate people and unqualified people.

Let me know when you can start and how soon you can complete this project.





Are you saying there are NO DALITS who are qualified to be the editor of Wire ? :lol:

Sounds like you hate Dalits :lol: .... shame on you. lol





Everything that comes out of the Wire is BS.
Are you dumb? The article clearly states that the lower caste employee was discriminated against by the racist hindu.
The fact that you think that the wire should have hired a dalit to write the article about a dalit is the peak of racist behaviour
 

Gadkari

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Are you dumb? The article clearly states that the lower caste employee was discriminated against by the racist hindu.
The fact that you think that the wire should have hired a dalit to write the article about a dalit is the peak of racist behaviour
Are you dumb ? the wire clearly shows that the lower caste employees was discriminated against by the racist Brhamin editor.
The fact that you think that CISCO should have hired a dalit to replace non dalits is the peak of racist behaviour. :agree:
 

jamahir

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Are you saying there are NO DALITS who are qualified to be the editor of Wire ? :lol:
You are going around in circles.

Sounds like you hate Dalits :lol: .... shame on you. lol
I don't hate Dalits. Do you ?

Since you want to remove prejudice, why not start with prejudice against Black people, fat people, short people, ugly people, women, ugly women, people with handicap, people with illness,
I am a socialist. I have empathy.

stupid people
I say that all those managers etc who did this discrimination are stupid.

illiterate people and unqualified people.
And these automatic anti-Dalit managers etc though not illiterate are unqualified. There should be enough native Americans to replace these discriminatory fools from India. The American companies should take lesson from UAE companies and immediately deport any Indian who has irrational hate for some community.
 

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