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In a wartime clock from start to finish how long will it take Pakistan to conquer India - 2yr, 5yr or 10yr campaign

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Ghazwa-e-Hind

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Pakistan is a state where internal enemies/traitors are roaming free.

The PDM traitors recently tried to topple Pakistani government with the help of foreign actors. Even Army confirmed this on National Security Meeting.

And you're expecting Pakistan to conquer India. What a joke.
 

Vapnope

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As if the internal situation was not enough, my man opens this thread to embarrass us more. What kind of kick someone gets by becoming a laughingstock? It is some new type of masochism?
 

SD 10

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India can’t defeat Pakistan militarily, says book


5febdadb84134.jpg


NEW DELHI: India has no clarity about its military and strategic objectives vis-à-vis its stated adversaries, Pakistan and China, and can defeat neither of them in a war, a new book by N.C. Asthana, former Indian police officer respected for his insights into security affairs, says.

The Wire on Tuesday carried a review of the book National Security and Conventional Arms Race: Spectre of a Nuclear War. It quotes the book as seeing “a huge mismatch between the militaristic official and media rhetoric, on the one hand, and the reality, which is that India cannot defeat either country militarily”.

The reviewer, Siddharth Varadarajan, editor of the esteemed current affairs portal, quotes Asthana as suggesting that instead of pouring vast sums of money into expensive weapons imports, India would be better served by finding solutions to the security challenges both Pakistan and China present by strengthening itself internally and pursuing non-military solutions, including diplomacy.

Asthana also puts the lens on what he calls the “politics of warmongering”, which, according to him, has consumed public discourse in India over the past six years.

“Under the delusion that India has somehow, magically become invincible, he notes how a large number of Indians seem to be itching for a war.”

This invincibility narrative is both fuelled and strengthened by relentless arms imports. Asthana puts the figure India has spent on arms imports in the five years since 2014 at $14 billion, “and the undisclosed cost of the 36 Rafale jets purchased from Dassault Aviation is not included in this”.

But even this sum pales before the $130bn India is projected to spend on arms imports in the next decade, including on 100-plus even more expensive fighter jets to make up for the shortfall caused by the Modi government’s decision to scrap the earlier deal for 126 Rafales.

“As the fanfare over the arrival of the first Rafales showed, each of these purchases is hailed and sold to the public by the media as weapons that will flatten India’s enemies. But of course, this is far from the truth,” Varadarajan quotes the book as saying.

Asthana argues that the frenzied import of conventional weapons will never guarantee a permanent solution to the military problem posed by Pakistan or China because both the countries are nuclear-weapon states and cannot be decisively defeated on the battlefield.

“Given the myth of Indian invincibility, the futility of warmongering should be obvious. Yet, as the past few years have demonstrated, jingoism in India is at an all-time high,” the book notes.

“While conventional weapons can provide a tactical advantage in limited theatre conflicts short of war, the danger lies in escalation — which is hard to control at the best of times but especially so when the public discourse has been vitiated by the politics of warmongering.”

Asthana believes that exploiting enmity with Pakistan for electoral benefits has made Indian leaders victims of their own rhetoric, where they are left with a one-dimensional policy — one which is unrealistic in view of Pakistan’s nuclear weapons. Quoting Napoleon, he notes: “If they want peace, nations should avoid the pinpricks that precede cannon shots.”

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This is from a 2020 book.. I agree with some parts of his takes but there are other parts which he has not taken into count ''what if Pakistan launches mass offensive'' or where doctrine is based on offensive solely meaning a much more ambitious approach from the Pakistani side could literally throw spin into everything. Meaning preparing for such an offensive will call for probably the biggest land-offensive in scale ever carried out in history but Pakistan has the manpower to commit to such a vast scale offensive. The Indians are suspect hence in such scenario I would put the house on pakistan getting it done in 3 years max assuming this is an ambitious Pakistan but the result is completely depended on Pakistan's appraoches and manuvers including scale of ambitions
pakistan can`t conquer india!
 

SD 10

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Are you fuking kidding me? :rofl:

These hindus are fuking garbage if Pakistan can't conquer then it would be national shame-day or rather easier way would be shoot yourself in the head.. There is no way Pakistan can't overrun cesspool India. A country which it has dominated and ruled for 1000 years including another 5000 years..

These tiny skinny azz Indians have never stopped an incursion and you will find out why.. I fancy ANA like collapse if rushed
no I don't kid!
 

Knockingdoors

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no I don't kid!

If you don't see yourself superior to these inferior to you then you got a problem find yourself first of all you need soul searching. It is like saying Pakistan can't take sub-sharen Africa-- The fuk is that.. You fancy hardcore fight or what not but that is just not the truth here to be honest. There are other places you can expect that but not here I assure you
 

Stealth

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Move on man nothing new for anyone.. India can't defeat even Nepal...demoralized force banged by Pakistan and China 2019 2020-21.... they r modi-military-wing rather than a state force ... relying on political rhetoric, dramas, bollywood movies... thats max they can do ...
 

Knockingdoors

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Move on man nothing new for anyone.. India can't defeat even Nepal...demoralized force banged by Pakistan and China 2019 2020-21.... they r modi-military-wing rather than a state force ... relying on political rhetoric, dramas, bollywood movies... thats max they can do ...

I am not sure anyone consumes bollywood outside of India itself
 

Khan vilatey

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India can’t defeat Pakistan militarily, says book


5febdadb84134.jpg


NEW DELHI: India has no clarity about its military and strategic objectives vis-à-vis its stated adversaries, Pakistan and China, and can defeat neither of them in a war, a new book by N.C. Asthana, former Indian police officer respected for his insights into security affairs, says.

The Wire on Tuesday carried a review of the book National Security and Conventional Arms Race: Spectre of a Nuclear War. It quotes the book as seeing “a huge mismatch between the militaristic official and media rhetoric, on the one hand, and the reality, which is that India cannot defeat either country militarily”.

The reviewer, Siddharth Varadarajan, editor of the esteemed current affairs portal, quotes Asthana as suggesting that instead of pouring vast sums of money into expensive weapons imports, India would be better served by finding solutions to the security challenges both Pakistan and China present by strengthening itself internally and pursuing non-military solutions, including diplomacy.

Asthana also puts the lens on what he calls the “politics of warmongering”, which, according to him, has consumed public discourse in India over the past six years.

“Under the delusion that India has somehow, magically become invincible, he notes how a large number of Indians seem to be itching for a war.”

This invincibility narrative is both fuelled and strengthened by relentless arms imports. Asthana puts the figure India has spent on arms imports in the five years since 2014 at $14 billion, “and the undisclosed cost of the 36 Rafale jets purchased from Dassault Aviation is not included in this”.

But even this sum pales before the $130bn India is projected to spend on arms imports in the next decade, including on 100-plus even more expensive fighter jets to make up for the shortfall caused by the Modi government’s decision to scrap the earlier deal for 126 Rafales.

“As the fanfare over the arrival of the first Rafales showed, each of these purchases is hailed and sold to the public by the media as weapons that will flatten India’s enemies. But of course, this is far from the truth,” Varadarajan quotes the book as saying.

Asthana argues that the frenzied import of conventional weapons will never guarantee a permanent solution to the military problem posed by Pakistan or China because both the countries are nuclear-weapon states and cannot be decisively defeated on the battlefield.

“Given the myth of Indian invincibility, the futility of warmongering should be obvious. Yet, as the past few years have demonstrated, jingoism in India is at an all-time high,” the book notes.

“While conventional weapons can provide a tactical advantage in limited theatre conflicts short of war, the danger lies in escalation — which is hard to control at the best of times but especially so when the public discourse has been vitiated by the politics of warmongering.”

Asthana believes that exploiting enmity with Pakistan for electoral benefits has made Indian leaders victims of their own rhetoric, where they are left with a one-dimensional policy — one which is unrealistic in view of Pakistan’s nuclear weapons. Quoting Napoleon, he notes: “If they want peace, nations should avoid the pinpricks that precede cannon shots.”

------------------------------------------

This is from a 2020 book.. I agree with some parts of his takes but there are other parts which he has not taken into count ''what if Pakistan launches mass offensive'' or where doctrine is based on offensive solely meaning a much more ambitious approach from the Pakistani side could literally throw spin into everything. Meaning preparing for such an offensive will call for probably the biggest land-offensive in scale ever carried out in history but Pakistan has the manpower to commit to such a vast scale offensive. The Indians are suspect hence in such scenario I would put the house on pakistan getting it done in 3 years max assuming this is an ambitious Pakistan but the result is completely depended on Pakistan's appraoches and manuvers including scale of ambitions
Interesting read. Pakistan in its current form would be hard pressed to capture significant Indian territory outside of Kashmir.

To give you an indea of why I say the above see the American civil war it took the Union 5+ years without any foreign intervention and a significant resupply and industrial capability to win a war of iteration.

In the current Russia ukrain war it is clear that the mechanized Russian army was able to advance 80+ kms a day with complete air superiority and was very susceptible to a well intrenched enemy with ATGMs etc.

Pakistan would face similar risk in india once we come out of the desert into cities and towns. India will have air superiority in their territory and our aircraft can not maneuver beyond 500 kms in india. We don’t have massive air refueling capability which would reduce our sorry rates to protect ground troops over 500 kms from Pakistans border. The civilian population would also be against PA in regular India.

In Kashmir the story would be different. Kashmir is within 500 kms of major Pakistani air bases. Once Enemy air defenses are gone, the Indian forces would have to fight two enemies 15 million pro Pakistani civilians and a determined paksitan army. This would considerably reduce their maneuverability and resupply.

This can be seen by how the Indian military installations are setup I.e. like mini fortresses in Kashmir . In time of war these would see problems of resupply and continuous attacks from insurgents, Pakistani drones and artillery and infantry attacks.

So Kashmir I believe with Chinese assistance and resupply can be taken in 13 days or less very similar to Bangladesh. Rest of India without any resupply from the world in 5 years

K
 
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