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"If a terror incident has been claimed by TTP it still doesn’t mean that it has been carried out by TTP." Spokesperson KP Government

HAIDER

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Thats the thing that I saying since long long time. TTP gets money to accept responsibility only. For example, what would terrorists will achieve by destroying aeroplanes which are solely meant for naval purposes.
Attack on Navel base in Karachi and Kamra .... responsibility taken by TTP...but.... these are strategic assets ....you raise a valid point ..

Taliban militants kill at least 29 people at Pakistani air base​




By Tim Craig
September 18, 2015
ISLAMABAD, PAKISTAN — Pakistani Taliban militants carried out their deadliest attack on the country’s military in nearly a decade Friday, storming an air force compound and killing 29 people — many of whom had been praying in a mosque.
The attack, a gruesome reminder of the reach of Taliban fighters in Pakistan, unfolded shortly before dawn on the outskirts of Peshawar in northwestern Pakistan.
Maj. Gen. Asim Bajwa, an army spokesman, said 13 Pakistani Taliban militants disguised in paramilitary uniforms entered Camp Badaber from two locations. Security officials quickly engaged the militants, who were armed with rocket launchers and assault rifles, but at least one of the Taliban fighters managed to enter the mosque during morning prayers.
“People were busy preparing for that, and they were unarmed and vulnerable, but these terrorists and these animals attacked and killed them,” Bajwa said.
Twenty-three air force personnel and three civilians were killed. An army officer and two soldiers were also killed while battling the militants. Eventually, all 13 terrorists were shot and killed before they could penetrate “deep” into the compound, Bajwa said.

In a statement, the Pakistani Taliban asserted responsibility for the attack, saying it was in retaliation for the ongoing military operation in the country’s northwestern tribal belt. That operation intensified in December after the Pakistani Taliban stormed an army-run school in Peshawar and killed about 150 students and teachers.
Since then, Pakistani military officials say they have largely driven the group from its havens in North Waziristan by capturing or killing thousands of militants. But others, including Pakistani Taliban leader Maulana Fazlullah, are believed to have fled across the border into Afghanistan.
Bajwa said the army has “recordings” that trace Friday’s attack back to Afghanistan.
“This operation was planned in Afghanistan and executed from Afghanistan,” Bajwa said. “That doesn’t imply that the government or state of Afghanistan was involved in this . . . but it is also a fact that there are a number of areas which are not in the control of Afghan security forces.”
Such a distinction may be crucial to efforts by Western diplomats to resolve recent tensions between Pakistani and Afghan leaders over accusations that each country harbors terrorist groups that carry out attacks on the other.
Last month, Afghan President Ashraf Ghani angrily blamed Pakistan for a series of attacks in Kabul, noting that Afghan Taliban leaders have historically found refuge on Pakistani soil.
Both Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif and the country’s army chief, Gen. Raheel Sharif, rushed to Peshawar on Friday afternoon to oversee the response to the attack. In a statement, U.S. Ambassador Richard G. Olson also condemned the “senseless and inhumane act” and said that “the United States stands with Pakistan in its struggle against terrorism.”

The assault was the deadliest in Pakistan since May, when 45 Shiite Muslims were massacred on a bus in the port city of Karachi.
Overall, however, Pakistani officials say there has been a 70 percent decline in major terrorist attacks this year, which they attribute to the ongoing military offensive.
But Friday’s attack shows that the Pakistani Taliban still has the capability to pull off headline-grabbing strikes, especially in the northwestern part of the country.
The air force compound was constructed in the late 1950s as a CIA surveillance base during the Cold War. After the CIA abandoned it in the 1970s, it became a housing compound for the Pakistani air force. The camp is about five miles from an airstrip where fighter jets and transport planes are kept.
Although many Pakistanis initially praised the military for repelling Friday’s assault, the mood in the country shifted by evening, when Bajwa announced that the death toll had risen dramatically. Now, the attack is renewing debate over the vulnerability of military facilities in this nuclear-armed country.
In September 2014, al-Qaeda militants sneaked onto a naval base in Karachi and launched an hours-long gun battle that killed a Pakistani sailor. Two years earlier, another security official was killed during an attack on an air base near the capital, Islamabad.
In 2011, Pakistani Taliban militants stormed Faisal air base in Karachi, killing 18 military personnel while also torching two U.S.-built surveillance planes. There was also a series of attacks near the army headquarters in Rawalpindi in 2009, including a suicide bombing in December of that year that killed several high-ranking military officers.
But Pakistani officials say Friday’s attack appears to have resulted in the largest loss of service members in a single terrorist strike since 2006, when about 40 Pakistani soldiers and army recruits were killed in a suicide bombing near Peshawar.
Still, Pakistani officials on Friday stressed that the country is winning its battle against the Pakistani Taliban.
“We are cutting the militants away from entering into the city, but there are many routes from where they can enter,” said Mushtaq Ghani, a spokesman for the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa provincial government. “We are at war, and such scattered attacks are possible.”

Haq Nawaz Khan in Peshawar and Shaiq Hussain in Islamabad contributed to this report.

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Kamra base damage AWACS
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muhammadhafeezmalik

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Security is a Federal issue, not a provincial issue. Go back to Swat operation.
There are 84 police stations & approx 200 police posts in Malakand Division. In Swat, there are 21 police stations & 30 police posts, which makes it 3 police stations & 4 police posts per Tehsil (total 7 Tehsils). CTD, Special Branch & Elite Force are separate separate.

Internal security is the job of police anywhere in the world. Police department has its own Elite force and CTD for counterterrorism operations; they're well trained. CTD, Elite Force and Special Branch is in each district.

The strength of Swat police is approx 2000 personnel which is equal to almost 3 infantry battalion of Army. In Malakand Division, the strength of Police is approx 20000 (as per statement of IG KP in 2018), which is equal to the strength of two infantry divisions of Army.

Swat's security control was handed over to Police (DIG Malakand) in Oct 2018 by Army in a ceremony in which CM & IG KP were present. IG KP said that police is well capable of maintaining law and order in Swat after removal of Army and their checkpoints.

And here you preaching us not to question KP Government??


Now your Nawaz Sharif is supporting Imran Khan on the establishment issues. Because Nawaz knows only Khan can confront this situation. If Khan falls then all sides clear for Nawaz politics and PM ship..

You are too funny!!

 

Bleek

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Thats the thing that I saying since long long time. TTP gets money to accept responsibility only. For example, what would terrorists will achieve by destroying aeroplanes which are solely meant for naval purposes.
It's a high value military target though, doesn't TTP go for those?

If not TTP, then who else?
 

HAIDER

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Badaber attack

Editorial Published September 19, 2015




30
Pakistani security personnel walk with their weapons outside a Pakistan Air Force base after an attack by militants in Peshawar.—AFP/File

Pakistani security personnel walk with their weapons outside a Pakistan Air Force base after an attack by militants in Peshawar.—AFP/File
MORE than a dozen attackers, some 30 dead, over two dozen injured — the militant attack on a Pakistan Air Force camp in Badaber, Peshawar was a highly orchestrated strike with deadly consequences.
While the military has rightly emphasised the valour and bravery of the security personnel who helped prevent even more carnage — the kind of weaponry the attackers were armed with, as reported in sections of the media, suggests many more casualties and perhaps a lengthy siege was the ultimate aim yesterday — there are an unavoidable set of questions that have yet again been raised by the events in Peshawar.
Know more: Army captain among 29 killed in TTP-claimed attack on PAF camp in Peshawar
To begin with, while the Badaber area is close to the tribal region and is densely populated, it is also a sensitive location where past attacks, including the ones on planes landing at the Peshawar airport, have been launched from.
Surely, for more than a dozen armed militants to disguise themselves as security personnel, travel through the Badaber area and arrive undetected at the entrance to the PAF camp is a security failure of some degree.
Moreover, it has already been claimed that there were intelligence reports of a possible strike in the area — who then was responsible for failing to tighten security quickly and adequately enough?
Then, there was the rather astonishing competition between the ISPR and the Taliban spokesperson, Muhammad Khurasani, to shape the narrative of the attack in real time.
While the ISPR was live tweeting the military’s response to the attack, the banned TTP was seemingly live blogging it — repeated messages were received by journalists from Khurasani giving an obviously one-sided though blow-by-blow account of what was allegedly taking place inside the PAF camp.
The basic question then, how were the militants able to use uninterrupted lines of communication to, firstly, communicate between themselves and, secondly, to communicate with the media?
Even if the command centre was in Afghanistan — though this has yet to be proved — it is troubling that the TTP continues to enjoy such direct and untroubled access to communications.
Furthermore, given the number of attackers, there was surely some kind of communication in the run-up to the attack between the perpetrators and the planners.
Why was all of that able to take place unhindered? If there is a plausible answer, the technical and physical limitations should be explained to the public.
It is disturbing that the TTP spokesman or his counterpart in other militant groups can continue to conduct communications with such ease inside Pakistan.
Finally, there is the issue of the National Action Plan. While the KP government and the provincial police leadership provide frequent updates about alleged terror suspects rounded up and various raids made, it still remains fairly obvious that the desirable level of cooperation and coordination between the civilian and military arms of the security apparatus is not there. Will anyone explain why and suggest immediate fixes?
Published in Dawn, September 20th, 2015

There are 84 police stations & approx 200 police posts in Malakand Division. In Swat, there are 21 police stations & 30 police posts, which makes it 3 police stations & 4 police posts per Tehsil (total 7 Tehsils). CTD, Special Branch & Elite Force are separate separate.

Internal security is the job of police anywhere in the world. Police department has its own Elite force and CTD for counterterrorism operations; they're well trained. CTD, Elite Force and Special Branch is in each district.

The strength of Swat police is approx 2000 personnel which is equal to almost 3 infantry battalion of Army. In Malakand Division, the strength of Police is approx 20000 (as per statement of IG KP in 2018), which is equal to the strength of two infantry divisions of Army.

Swat's security control was handed over to Police (DIG Malakand) in Oct 2018 by Army in a ceremony in which CM & IG KP were present. IG KP said that police is well capable of maintaining law and order in Swat after removal of Army and their checkpoints.

And here you preaching us not to question KP Government??




You are too funny!!

He is honest ...isn't it.
 

Stealth

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For the last 6 years, everything was absolutely fine in KPK in terms of the security situation. Now a sudden change in the security apparatus is clearly evident who is behind this new uncertain situation in the province. After completely failing against the IK's powerful & aggressive slot, the mil establishment was completely off-guarded. In order to counter IK and his party, they came up with a new BS idea (which was expected). Let's create trouble for him by deteriorating the security situation in his party's controlled province. I mean these guys are seriously damaging Pakistan left to right for the last 75 years!
 
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HAIDER

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Imran Khan says so that he was doing of negotiations and it is his policy.
Well, Nawaz try to negotiate but result ....

Pakistani government and Taliban hold talks​

The first formal meeting between the Pakistani government and a Taliban-nominated team is described as “cordial”.



Play Video
Video Duration 02 minutes 17 seconds02:17
Pakistani government and Taliban hold talks
Published On 6 Feb 20146 Feb 2014
A long-awaited first round of peace talks between the Pakistani Taliban and the government has been held in Islamabad after numerous delays and growing doubt over the chance of their success.
The two sides met on Thursday for a preliminary meeting likely to chart a “road map” for future discussions, amid deep scepticism over whether dialogue can yield a lasting peace deal. The talks will resume on Friday.

Pakistani Taliban fighters have been battling for years to topple the central government and establish Islamic rule, but Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif believes the movement is now ready to find a negotiated settlement and stop the fighting.
In a statement after the meeting, which lasted over three hours, the two sides stressed their commitment to dialogue.
“Both committees concluded that all sides should refrain from any act that could damage the talks,” it said. “Both condemn recent acts of violence in Pakistan, saying such efforts should not sabotage the talks.”
Irfan Siddiqui, a government negotiator picked by Sharif, sent a text message from the meeting to the Reuters news agency, describing the atmosphere as “cordial and friendly”.
The peace initiative, which Sharif announced just as many were anticipating a major military offensive on Tehreek-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP) strongholds in the North Waziristan tribal area, got off to a chaotic start earlier this week.
The government delegation missed the planned opening meeting on Tuesday saying they were unsure of who was representing the TTP at the talks and what powers they had been given.
Fragile security
Underlining the fragile security situation, a suicide bomber on Tuesday killed eight people in a sectarian attack against minority Shia Muslims in the northwestern city of Peshawar, just hours after the abortive start to the talks.

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The main TTP spokesman denied they were behind the blast but a commander for the group in Peshawar told the AFP news agency his men were responsible, saying no ceasefire had been announced.
Stability in nuclear-armed Pakistan is seen as important to neighbouring Afghanistan, where US-led NATO troops are pulling out after more than a decade of war.
Washington has said it is watching the talks closely. It has long been pushing Pakistan to take action against armed groups using the tribal areas as a base to attack NATO forces across the border.
One of the TTP’s negotiating team, Maulana Abdul Aziz, said on Wednesday that there was no chance of peace unless the government agreed to the armed group’s demand for Islamic law to be imposed throughout Pakistan.
The government has insisted that Pakistan’s constitution must remain paramount.
SOURCE: AL JAZEERA, NEWS AGENCIES

Sharif and the Pakistan Taliban: Peace Talks Loss is Washington’s Gain​

SITUATION REPORTS - May 6, 2014
By Zachary J. Rose
John Kerry and Nawaz Shariff

It appears as though the latest attempt at reconciliation between the government of Pakistan and the Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan (Pakistan Taliban, or TTP) may be falling apart without any new breakthroughs. However, given the strategic dimensions involved, one has to wonder if any stakeholders were holding out any real hope of a peaceful resolution in the first place.
For several months, the government of Pakistan has apparently been attempting to end its conflict with the TTP, a militant insurgent network with ties to Al Qaeda and the Afghan Taliban. The TTP, which formed in 2007 and operates primarily in the northwestern regions on the afpak border, is fighting to impose strict Sharia law across Pakistan, and as such it rejects the country’s current constitution, which it believes fails to adequately enshrine Islamic law. Peace talks and reconciliation with the TTP were major campaign promises of Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif prior to his election victory last summer.
Despite government efforts, peace talks have failed to gain any momentum, with both sides continuing to engage in military actions against the other. Brutal executions and military strikes have often left the talks stalled or officially suspended.
On March 1 the TTP agreed to a month-long ceasefire, during which time the peace talks could – it was hoped – make some real progress. Prime Minister Sharif is under a great deal of political pressure to end the fighting, which has resulted in thousands of deaths over the years. Despite their primary goal of overthrowing the Pakistani government and spreading Sharia law through jihad, the TTP has come forward with a few short-term, more realistic demands such as the release of several hundred prisoners, who the group claims to be non-combatants.
Earlier talks produced a ceasefire extension until April 10, but more recently, the TTP has announced that the combat freeze will not be renewed past this date. Both sides have asserted that the talks will continue despite resumed hostilities, though it is unlikely that any serious discussion will take place. Far more likely is that the peace process will regress to its familiar form: paused or cancelled every few weeks in the wake of some new attack.
It is still unclear what might have ever resulted from these talks. After all, the TTP’s ultimate objectives are completely unacceptable to Pakistan. Even if the TTP were to give up its goal of imposing Sharia law across the country, they would at the very least demand a full withdrawal of Pakistani forces from TTP-controlled tribal territory. Prime Minister Sharif could not accept these conditions – nor could the United States, which has shown no willingness to decrease its military footprint in the region.

Show talks
There are signs that this latest round of talks were an empty gesture by both parties. Whatever the prospect of success, Sharif is being pushed to the table by his constituents and by his own election promises. Whether or not anything substantive could be achieved through such a dialogue, he must be seen as at least making the effort, especially if he intends to eventually pursue a military option. The loss of life in such an action would be dire, and the TTP is not without its sympathizers among the people of Pakistan. Before engaging in a wave of aggression against the Taliban and paying a heavy price, Sharif has to first be seen as exhausting all other options.
Likewise, the TTP is surely aware that the government cannot accept the majority of the group’s demands. The release of political prisoners is plausible, but anything more than that could scarcely be considered. Taliban spokesman Shahidullah Shahid claims that the TTP had also asked for the establishment of a conflict-free zone and the suspension of security operations in that area. Purportedly suggested to build trust and relax the tension, these steps would effectively cede official control of state territory, which is something the government simply cannot do.
It has been suggested that the TTP was prompted by insurgent partners, such as the Afghan Taliban and the Haqqani network, to pursue the ceasefire. The reprieve may have provided an opportunity for affiliated insurgents to regroup in TTP-controlled border regions. In such a case, it would not matter to the Taliban what, if anything, the peace talks accomplished.

Peace a threat to US-Pakistan relations
These peace talks, however doomed, only put further strain on US-Pakistan relations.
However unlikely, a successful peace deal would only harm US interests, as the Pakistan Taliban operates in partnership with the Afghan Taliban and other extremist groups. If the Pakistani military were to decrease pressure on the Taliban over the long-term, it would risk creating a safe haven which the Afghanistan branch could use for retreat and a new base of operations.
It seems the United States is keenly aware of this fact. US cooperation has been limited during the ongoing peace process, apart from lip service. In late 2013, for example, emergent peace overtures with the Taliban were derailed when the US used a targeted drone strike to kill Hakimullah Mehsud, then-leader of the TTP, mere days before a government delegation was being sent to negotiate. Drone strikes persist as a controversial focal point for all parties, and the US has demonstrated that it intends to pursue its own military agenda despite any local backlash or official protest from Prime Minister Sharif.
While these drone strikes are incredibly controversial in Pakistan, they are popular in an increasingly war-weary United States. They have proven effective in eliminating high-profile targets, and they do so while minimizing the loss of American life. They have also been valuable to President Obama politically by allowing him to demonstrate his resolve and efficacy in the global fight against terrorism.

Bleak prospects for peace
These peace talks have not made a very strong case for themselves. Both sides appear to prefer pursuing their military objectives while making a show of reconciliation only when it is politically or strategically convenient. Additionally, the peace talks have not received any support from President Obama, who clearly prefers to continue the drone strike program and is in no hurry to help Sharif keep his electoral promises. It is clear that an indefinite truce does not serve any player’s political or military interests, and as a result, more stalling, suspension, and equivocation can be expected for the foreseeable future.
 

Riz

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from last 6 years... everything was fine in kpk... now KPK is under IK and this is the time to damage PTI and IK in KPK so chutya estb came up with new agenda... they are not even for Pakistan quite frankly.. damaging Pakistan from last 75 years...
divide and rule , what Establishment doing in KPK is same what MQM was doing in karachi in past , they invited TTP in kpk and invited haramis like manzoor pashteen to pump-up Sectarianism in sawati pakhtoons , just only to defeat imran khan PTI in the area
 

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