What's new

IAC-1 INS VIKRANT | Updates and Discussions

Ind4Ever

BANNED
Jan 20, 2015
3,580
-3
3,869
Country
India
Location
India
For the decommissioned Majestic-class aircraft carrier, see INS Vikrant (R11).

Official Indian Navy CGI of INS Vikrant
Class overview
Name: Vikrant-class aircraft carrier
Builders: Cochin Shipyard Limited
Operators:

Indian Navy
Preceded by: INS Vikramaditya
In commission: 2018 (INS Vikrant)[1]
2025 (INS Vishal)
Building: 1
Planned: 2
General characteristics
Type: Aircraft carrier
Displacement: INS Vikrant: 40,000 tonnes
INS Vishal: 65,000 tonnes[2]
Length: 262 metres (860 ft)
Beam: 60 metres (200 ft)
Draught: 8.4 metres (28 ft)
Depth: 25.6 metres (84 ft)
Decks: 2.5 acres (110,000 sq ft; 10,000 m2)
Propulsion:
Speed: 28 kn (52 km/h)
Range: 8,000 nmi (15,000 km)[3]
Complement: 1,400 (incl air crew)
Sensors and
processing systems:
  • 1 x Selex RAN-40L
  • L-band early warning
Electronic warfare
& decoys:
Armament:
Aircraft carried: INS Vikrant;[4]
The Vikrant class (Sanskrit: विक्रान्त) (formerly Project 71 Air Defence Ship (ADS) or Indigenous Aircraft Carrier (IAC)) is a class of two aircraft carriers being built for the Indian Navy. The two vessels are the largest warships and the first aircraft carriers to be designed and built in India. They are being built byCochin Shipyard Limited.

Preparations for building the lead vessel of the class, INS Vikrant, started in 2008, and the keel was laid in February 2009. The carrier was floated out of her dry dock on 29 December 2011,[5] and launched on 12 August 2013.[6] The scale and complexity of the project caused problems which delayed the commencement and timeline of construction for the carrier. Technical difficulties, the cost of refitting the Russian-built carrier INS Vikramaditya, and billions in cost overruns[7] have delayed plans for the first of the vessels to enter service, which is now scheduled for 2018.

The first ship of the class, Vikrant, displaces about 40,000 metric tons (39,000 long tons), is 262 metres (860 ft) long and has a tailored air group of up to thirty aircraft. The IAC-I features a STOBAR[12] (Short Take-Off But Arrested Recovery) configuration with a ski-jump. The deck is designed to enable aircraft such as the MiG-29K to operate from the carrier. She will deploy up to 30 fixed-wing aircraft,[13]primarily the Mikoyan MiG-29K and the naval variant of the HAL Tejas Mark 2, besides carrying 10 Kamov Ka-31 orWestland Sea King helicopters. The Ka-31 will fulfill the airborne early warning(AEW) role and the Sea King will provideanti-submarine warfare (ASW) capability.[14][15]


INS Vikrant during its launch in August 2013
The carrier is powered by four General Electric LM2500+ gas turbines on two shafts, generating over 80MW of power. The gearboxes for the carriers were designed and supplied by Elecon Engineering.

Carrier air groupEdit

Computer graphics of Tejas naval variant.
India considered a number of aircraft for operation from its INS Vikramaditya and the planned indigenous aircraft carrier. India evaluated the Russian Sukhoi Su-33, but chose the lighter Mikoyan MiG-29K as Vikramaditya was smaller and lacked an aircraft catapult.[26] On 18 January 2010, it was reported that India and Russia were close to signing a deal for 29 MiG-29K fighters to operate from IAC-I.[27] In addition, the navy signed a deal for six naval-variants of the HAL Tejas.[28] In June 2012, Flight Globalreported that the Indian Navy was considering the use of Rafale M (Naval variant) on the IAC. The Rafale M is almost the same size as the MiG-29K, but packs a much greater punch.[29]

The Navy has earlier indicated it prefers the Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System (EMALS) on its second carrierVishal.[30] INS Vishal will feature steam catapults for operating larger fighter aircraft, and carry heavier airborne early-warning (AEW) system and aerial refuelers.

ConstructionEdit
Amongst the first construction problems experienced was the lack of supply of carrier-grade steel due to the inability of Russia to supply the AB/A grade steel. Finally, the Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory(DMRL) worked with the Steel Authority of India Limited (SAIL) to create suitable production facilities for the steel in India.[5][14] The SAIL Steel Plants of the Steel at Bhilai, Rourkela, Durgapur andBokaro manufactured 26,000 tonnes of three special steels being used for the hull, flight deck and floor compartments of the carrier.[32]

The keel for Vikrant was laid by Defence Minister A.K. Antony at the Cochin Shipyard on 28 February 2009.[33][34]The ship uses modular construction, with 874 blocks joined together for the hull. By the time the keel was laid, 423 blocks weighing over 8,000 tons had been completed.[35] The construction plan called for the carrier to be launched in 2010, when it would displace some 20,000 tonnes, as a larger displacement could not be accommodated in the building bay. It was planned that after about a year’s development in the refit dock, the carrier would be launched when all the major components, including underwater systems, would be in place. Outfitting would then be carried out after launch. As per theCabinet Committee on Security (CCS), sea trials were initially planned to commence in 2013, with the ship to be commissioned in 2014.[36][37]

In March 2011, it was reported that the project had been affected by the delay in delivery of the huge main gearboxes for the carrier. The supplier, Elecon Engineering, had to work around a number of technical complexities due to the length of the propulsion shafts.[38]Other issues resulting in delays included an accident with a diesel generator and an issue with its alignment.[39] In August 2011, the defence ministry reported to the Lok Sabha that 75% of the construction work for the hull of the lead carrier had been completed and the carrier would be first launched in December 2011, following which further works would be completed until commissioning.[40][41]On 29 December 2011, the completed hull of the carrier was first floated out of its dry dock at CSL, with its displacement at over 14,000 tonnes.[16]Interior works and fittings on the hull would be carried out until the second half of 2012, when it would again be dry-docked for integration with its propulsion and power generation systems.[3][5]

In July 2012, The Times of India reported that construction of Vikrant has been delayed by 3 years, and the ship would be ready for commissioning by 2017. Then again in November 2012, NDTVreported that cost of the aircraft carrier had increased and the delivery has been delayed by at least five years and is expected to be with the Indian Navy only after 2018 as against the scheduled date of delivery of 2014.[42]Work has begun for next stage which includes installation of the integrated propulsion system. Italian defence major Avio is installing the integrated platform management system (IPMS).[43][44]

Vikrant's launch
In July 2013, Defence Minister A K Antony announced that Vikrant would be launched on 12 August at the Cochin Shipyard. After its launch, Vikrant would be re-docked for completion of rest of the work including the flight deck. According to Vice Admiral Robin Dhowan, about 83% of the fabrication work and 75% of the construction work has been completed. He said that 90% of the body work of the aircraft carrier had been designed and made in India, about 50% of the propulsion system, and about 30% of the fighting capability of the carrier was Indian. He also said that the ship will be equipped with a long range missile system with multi-function radar and a close-in weapon system (CIWS). The ship was launched by Elizabeth Antony, wife of Defence Minister A K Antony on 12 August 2013. Extensive sea trials are expected to begin in 2016 and the ship will be inducted into the navy by late 2018.


Please add valuable information about INS Vikrant .
 

Ind4Ever

BANNED
Jan 20, 2015
3,580
-3
3,869
Country
India
Location
India
Propulsion System : Main engines
INS Vikrant will be powered by four American LM2500 marine gas turbines produced by GE Aviation which are in service with more than 29 international navies and used in Thai, Italian and Spanish developed Aircraft Carriers.





LM2500+G4 Aeroderivative Gas Turbine Package (34 MW)
GE's LM2500+G4 aeroderivative gas turbine package combines the successful heritage of the LM2500 Base and LM2500+ aeroderivative gas turbine packages to create a powerful and very reliable solution ideal for marine applications. With a modified zero state for increased flow and pressure ratio as well as its improved design and materials in the high-pressure and power turbines, the LM2500+G4 delivers an impressive shaft horsepower of 42,070.

Features & Benefits
  • Full power within 10 minutes
  • Direct drive for 50 and 60 Hz power generation
  • Variable speed for mechanical drive
  • Reduced maintenance intervals with simplified, high-quality construction
  • Dual fuel capability for distillate and natural gas
  • Reduced NOx with DLE combustor and natural gas fuel
  • Optional steam or water injection system for NOx emission control
  • Proven G4 technology derived from the CF6 aircraft engine
  • Fewer maintenance intervals with simplified, high-quality construction
  • Easy installation and maintenance with lightweight, compact, modular design
Basic Specifications
  • POWER RANGE: 34 MW
  • RELIABILITY: 99%
  • EFFICIENCY: 41%
  • TURBINE SPEED: 3,600 rpm
 

Ind4Ever

BANNED
Jan 20, 2015
3,580
-3
3,869
Country
India
Location
India
  • Radars : Italian Firm Selex Sistemi will provide air surveillance Naval RAN 40L AESA radar and IFF radar and Israeli EL/M-2248 MF-STAR AESA radar will also be used for INS Vikrant.

  • Selex ES has been very successful in selling radars to the Indian military. In 2011, it was awarded a contract to supply the Indian Navy with its RAN-40L 3D L Band Air Surveillance Radar which will be installed on-board the Indigenous Aircraft Carrier 1 (IAC-1), being built at Cochin Shipyard. The RAN-40L is a 3D Long Range Early Warning Radar with a fully solid-state active phased array antenna. It performs Track While Scan (TWS) Air/surface long-range surveillance (detection of aircraft up to 400km and a minimum range of 180m) along with an anti TBM role and anti-missile mode.

EL/M-2248 AESA onboard a Kolkata class destroyer of the Indian Navy
An active electronically scanned array(AESA), also known as active phased array radar (APAR), is a type of phased array radar whose transmitter andreceiver (transceiver) functions are composed of numerous small solid-state transmit/receive modules (TRMs). AESA radars aim their "beam" by emitting separate radio waves from each module that interfere constructively at certain angles in front of the antenna. Advanced AESA radars can improve on the older passive electronically scanned array (PESA) radars by spreading their signal emissions out across a band of frequencies, which makes it very difficult to detect over background noise, allowing ships and aircraft to broadcast powerful radar signals while still remaining stealthy.




Basic concept

Radar systems generally work by connecting an antenna to a powerful radio transmitter to emit a short pulse of signal. The transmitter is then disconnected and the antenna is connected to a sensitive receiver which amplifies any echos from target objects. By measuring the time it takes for the signal to return, the radar receiver can determine the distance to the object. The receiver then sends the resulting output to a display of some sort. The transmitter elements were typicallyklystron tubes or magnetrons, which are suitable for amplifying or generating a narrow range of frequencies to high power levels. To scan a portion of the sky, the radar antenna must be physically moved to point in different directions.

Starting in the 1960s new solid-statedevices capable of delaying the transmitter signal in a controlled way were introduced. That led to the first practical large-scale passive electronically scanned array, or simply phased array radar. PESAs took a signal from a single source, split it into hundreds of paths, selectively delayed some of them, and sent them to individual antennas. The radio signals from the separate antennas overlapped in space, and the interference patterns between the individual signals was controlled to reinforce the signal in certain directions, and mute it in all others. The delays could be easily controlled electronically, allowing the beam to be steered very quickly without moving the antenna. A PESA can scan a volume of space much quicker than a traditional mechanical system. Additionally, thanks to progress in electronics, PESAs added the ability to produce several active beams, allowing them to continue scanning the sky while at the same time focusing smaller beams on certain targets for tracking or guiding semi-active radar homingmissiles. PESAs quickly became widespread on ships and large fixed emplacements in the 1960s, followed by airborne sensors as the electronics shrank.

AESAs are the result of further developments in solid-state electronics. In earlier systems the transmitted signal was originally created in a klystron ortraveling wave tube or similar device, which are relatively large. Receiver electronics were also large due to the high frequencies that they worked with. The introduction of gallium arsenidemicroelectronics through the 1980s served to greatly reduce the size of the receiver elements, until effective ones could be built at sizes similar to those of handheld radios, only a few cubic centimeters in volume. The introduction of JFETs and MESFETs did the same to the transmitter side of the systems as well. Now an entire radar, the transmitter, receiver and antenna, could be shrunk into a single "transmitter-receiver module" (TRM) about the size of a carton of milk.

The primary advantage of an AESA over a PESA is capability of the different modules to operate on different frequencies. Unlike the PESA, where the signal is generated at single frequencies by a small number of transmitters, in the AESA each module generates and radiates its own independent signal. This allows the AESA to produce numerous "sub-beams" and actively "paint" a much larger number of targets. Additionally, the solid-state transmitters are able to transmit effectively at a much wider range of frequencies, giving AESAs the ability to change their operating frequency with every pulse sent out. AESAs can also produce beams that consist of many different frequencies at once, using post-processing of the combined signal from a number of TRMs to re-create a display as if there was a single powerful beam being sent
 

Badbadman

BANNED
Nov 17, 2012
625
-9
583
Country
India
Location
Australia
May be change the thread name into Indian Aircraft Carriers. Indian Aircraft Carriers deserve a separate sticky thread.
 

Ind4Ever

BANNED
Jan 20, 2015
3,580
-3
3,869
Country
India
Location
India
The 76/62 Super Rapid (SR) Gun Mount is a light weight, rapid-fire naval gun


The 76/62 Super Rapid (SR) Gun Mount is a light weight, rapid-fire naval gunproviding unrivalled performance and flexibility in any air defence and anti surface role, particularly in anti-missile role.

Capability for very effective engagement of shore based targets is also provided for unique multi-role performance.

The 76/62 SR is suitable for installation on ships of any type and class, including small naval units.
Interface to a large variety of ship's Combat Management System and/or FCS/EOS is provided, according to digital as well as analogical standard, including open architecture.
The Firing rate can be selected from single shot to firing 120 rds/min.

In operational condition the tactical time is less than 3 seconds and the standard deviation at firing is less than 0.3 mrad, thus providing excellent accuracy.

The 76/62 SR (together with the 76/62 Compact) is the only medium caliber naval gun available in the capable of sustained fire, which is a fundamental requirement in any scenario involving the simultaneous engagement of multiple maneuvering target, as requested by the emergingasymmetric warfare scenarios.

Automatic loading is provided through a revolving magazine and rapid reloading is easily undertaken even during firing action by two ammunition handlers.

Standard supply includes the new Digital Control Console (DCC) capitalizing the digital technology to increase the functions available to the operator and to the maintainers.
The 76/62 SR is ready for operating the OTO Melara 3AP Multifunction Programmable Fuse.
The in service and new 76/62 SR, have the necessary flexibility for being fitted with optional:

  • Integral Stealth Shield to reduce the total RCS of the ship
  • Muzzle Velocity Radar to update the FCS of eventual deviations from range table values
  • Multi Feeding Device for the automatic handling, selection and feeding of any type of ammunition loaded
  • STRALES system – a guidance system for the DART guided projectile.

Weapons on board : 30 fixed wing AC +15 Helicopters

Mig 29 KUB/K & Naval Tejas MK 1/MK2

Mig 29 KUB/K

MiG-29K is an all-weather carrier-based multirole fighter aircraft being produced by Russian Aircraft Corporation MiG (RAC MiG). The aircraft is also offered in a two-seat operational trainer variation known as the MiG-29KUB.

The MiG-29K/KUB aircraft are designed to operate from aircraft-carriers with a minimum displacement of 28,000t and airfields.

The aircraft has a length of 17.3m, height of 4.4m and a wingspan of 11.9m. The maximum take-off weight is 24,500kg.

Orders and deliveries of the Russian MiG-29K
"MiG-29K is an all-weather carrier-based multirole fighter aircraft being produced by Russian Aircraft Corporation MiG (RAC MiG)."
In January 2004, India placed an order for 12 MiG-29K single-seat and four MiG-29KUB two-seat fighters. Deliveries of the aircraft began in December 2009. Six aircraft were delivered by the end of 2010. The MiG-29K entered operational service with Indian Navy in February 2010.

In March 2010, India signed a $1.5bn contract with Russia for an additional 29 MiG-29Ks. Deliveries are expected to start in 2012.

In May 2011, five MiG-29K / KUBs and a flight simulator were delivered to the Indian Navy under the first contract, with further deliveries planned through 2011. The fighters will be based on the aircraft carrier INS Vikramaditya. The Vikramaditya is expected to carry up to 24 MiG-29K/KUB fighters. The Vikrant Class future indigenous aircraft carrier currently being built by India will also accommodate the MiG-29K/KUB aircraft.

The Russian Navy ordered 24 MiG-29Ks in late 2009 for Kuznetsov Class heavy aircraft carrying cruiser. Deliveries of the MiG-29K for the Russian Navy began in 2010.

On 23 June 2011, a MiG-29KUB of the Indian Navy crashed during a flight test in Astrakhan region, Russia. The crash, which occurred due to pilot's error, killed both the pilots on board. In August 2011, RAC MiG however announced the deliveries will be made as per the schedule.

MiG-29K development history
The MiG-29K project was initiated in the late 1970s to meet the requirements of the Soviet Navy for a supersonic carrier-based fighter. The first proof of concept version, MiG-29KVP, was developed based on the MiG-29M.

The MiG-29KVP completed its maiden flight in August 1982. The aircraft with new undercarriage and folding wings of greater area, differed from the MiG-29 production model.

The first MiG-29K took to the skies on 23 July 1988. The aircraft performed its first carrier landing on the aircraft-carrying cruiser Tbilisi (now Admiral Kuznetsov) on 1 November 1989. The project was halted due to the dissolution of the Soviet Union. Mikoyan continued the development and struggled with funding issues until it received orders from India. The MiG-29KUB aircraft completed its first flight in January 2007.

MiG-29K design features
The MiG-29K features a strengthened airframe and undercarriage suitable for landing on aircraft carriers. The airframe is made of about 15% composite materials. The aircraft is fitted with folding wings, arrestor hook and a catapult for carrier operations. The radar signature of the aircraft is reduced by four to five times over the basic MiG-29.

The MiG-29K is fitted with more powerful RD-33MK engines, replacing the RD-33K turbofan engines used in the early prototypes. The flight hours of the fighter are doubled, but the flight hour cost is reduced by about 2.5 times. The aircraft can operate without overhaul.

The single and double seat variations feature the same airborne equipment and weapons. The MiG-29KUB two-seat fighter is primarily intended for pilot training, but can also conduct combat missions similar to the single-seat fighter.

The glass cockpit of the MiG-29K aircraft accommodates one pilot. It is equipped with three multifunctional colour LCDs, a digital fly-by-wire flight control system and TopOwl helmet-mounted targeting system.

MiG-29K avionics systems
The airborne avionics based on open architecture are classified under MIL-STD-1553B standard. The open architecture allows the installation of new equipment and weapons according to customer requirements.

The fighter has multirole, multimode Zhuk-ME pulse doppler radar from Fazotron-NIIP Corporation. The radar with the slot array has wider scanning angle and longer target detection range. Zhuk-ME can track up to ten air targets while engaging four targets simultaneously.

The MiG-29K/KUB fighters have multichannel infra-red search and track (IRST) system with target designation system. The aircraft can also be installed with IR and laser sighting devices for ground targets illumination.

Weapon systems on the Russian-built MiG-29K carrier-based multirole fighter
MiG-29K is armed with RVV-AE and R-73E air-to-air missiles, Kh-31A and Kh-35E anti-ship missiles and Kh-31P anti-radar missiles. Other armaments include guided aerial bombs, rockets and aerial bombs.

"In January 2004, India placed an order for 12 MiG-29K single-seat and four MiG-29KUB two-seat fighters."
The aircraft is mounted with a 30mm GSh-30-1 cannon with 100 rounds. A wide range of weapons can be added upon the request of the customer.

MiG-29K/KUB is the only ship-borne fighter in the world to fire Kh-31A supersonic anti-ship missiles resistant to air-defence.

The MiG-29K is powered by two RD-33MK engines equipped with smokeless combustion chamber and new full authority digital engine control (FADEC) system.

The power plant provides a ferry range of 2,000km. The range can be increased to 3,000km with three underwing fuel drop tanks.
 

Tai Hai Chen

BANNED
Oct 15, 2017
19,749
-19
9,373
Country
Canada
Location
Canada
Vikrant was laid down in February 2009. Progress is very slow. China would have built such a 40,000 ton ship within 1 year.
 
Last edited:

Deino

INT'L MOD
Nov 9, 2014
10,373
14
16,850
Country
Germany
Location
Germany
From my observation seeing the picture the lift visible is being restructured...
MIG29k will surely be replaced on IAC1 with in few years...

Unlikely at least "with in few years". Why are the options now that the naval Tejas is de facto dead as an operational fighter and then? Even if the IN decides on a type soon, it will take again years for the Indian bureaucracy to order them,
 

Tumba

BANNED
Jan 24, 2011
1,614
-20
848
Country
India
Location
India
Unlikely at least "with in few years". Why are the options now that the naval Tejas is de facto dead as an operational fighter and then? Even if the IN decides on a type soon, it will take again years for the Indian bureaucracy to order them,
True not with in few years but
Once IAC1 start operational patrolling we can expect Naval fighters probably F18 or Rafale bought in direct military sale ... doesnt take much time for that once go ahead is given.. if F18 selected Americans give delivery ahead of schedule.. so if order given by 2023 we will see F18 landing in India by 2024 or 2025...
 

Tai Hai Chen

BANNED
Oct 15, 2017
19,749
-19
9,373
Country
Canada
Location
Canada
I was under the impression Vikrant is delayed because the radar, engine, planes, missiles which are imported from abroad are delayed by covid.
 

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Total: 1, Members: 0, Guests: 1)


Top Bottom