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The SC

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Three French-made Rafale fighter jets fly with other Egyptian Air Force warplanes, unseen, above Cairo on July 21, 2015. (Khaled Desouki/AFP via Getty Images)

Egypt’s fleet of military aircraft are able to share data and coordinate activity despite their mixed origins, thanks to a locally made command center, according to an Egyptian armed forces expert.

It’s rare to witness an air force flying fighter jets and helicopters of different origins, but Egypt operates aircraft from Russia, China, the United States and European nations.

“When it comes to the Egyptian Air Force in particular, it is definitely not possible for [American-made] E-2C Hawkeye 2000 early warning aircraft in service, for example, to direct the [Russian-made] MiG-29 fighters and exchange data with them, as is the case with the [American-made] F-16 and [French-made] Rafale fighters,” said Mohamed al-Kenany, a military affairs researcher and defense analyst at the Arab Forum for Analyzing Iranian Policies in Cairo.

“However, data is being shared between the different-origin aircraft through the command-and-control centers that are equipped with dedicated systems capable of linking the various radar, aircraft, sensors, reconnaissance and electronic warfare systems, and integrating all the information and data they receive into a unified system named RISC2.”

The Radar Integration and Surveillance Command Center was made by the Egyptian military’s Research and Development Department; Benha Electronics, which is affiliated with the Ministry of Military Production; the Military Technical College; and the Egyptian Air Defense Forces.


The RISC2 is an Egyptian-made system that was introduced during EDEX 2018. (Courtesy of Mohamed al-Kenany)

The RISC2 is an Egyptian-made system that was introduced during EDEX 2018. (Courtesy of Mohamed al-Kenany)

RISC2 was introduced during the 2018 Egypt Defence Expo and is meant to automate control-and-command tasks. The platform is equipped with tools for flight planning, control systems for radars and various monitoring sensors (including models from the United States, Russia, China, France, Britain and Egypt), an automatic flight-tracking system, a network management system, and cybersecurity.

Al-Kenany said in addition to linking aircraft, the system allows the military’s land and sea combat platforms to share data.

“This system enables the dynamic exchange of integrated data with various command-and-control centers, with the next generation of cyber protection systems and firewalls ... as well as the Egyptian surface-to-air missile command center to analyze and assess the risks and air threats, and [determine] the type of air defense systems needed to deal with these threats,” he added.

He hasn’t observed any problems with Egypt’s air defense systems differentiating enemy aircraft from friendly ones. “The various types of IFF [identification friend or foe systems] produced by different companies for Egypt’s armed forces are designed to be compatible with all the systems and equipment operational in the country, and hence identifying their specific frequencies and codes as friendly, which prevents friendly fires,” he explained.

To overcome delays in data sharing, the Air Force looked to the Rafale "to link aircraft of different origins during the flight, since it is equipped not only with Link 16 data links but also with other solutions for non-NATO countries to operate in integrated operational [environments] with all platforms and with friendly combat assets, and airborne command and control, which allows it to operate in harmony with modern Russian fighters operating for the Egyptian Air Force,” al-Kenany explained.

He also pointed to Egypt’s TIBA-1 communications satellite, which was launched onboard an Ariane 5 rocket in November 2019 for government communications and military purposes. He said the satellite will facilitate data sharing between Air Force fighters and helicopter of different origins.

What is Egypt flying?

In terms of Western systems, the Egyptian Air Force currently operates 24 Rafale fighter jets (and wants to double that number), 20 F-16 Block 52 fighters, 10 AH-64D Apache Longbow helicopters (with plans to double its inventory), 15 Mirage 2000 jets, and eight early warning E-2C Hawkeye planes.

From the East, the service operates 46 MiG-29M fighter jets, 46 Ka-52 Alligator armed reconnaissance helicopters, and an unknown number of Mi-24 combat multirole helicopters, which first appeared in Egyptian service in 2018. The Air Force also ordered 24 Su-35S Super Flanker jets but has only received five so far, according to Russian media.

Russian Kamov Ka-52 Alligator attack helicopters fly over the Kremlin and Red Square in downtown Moscow on May 9, 2020. (Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP via Getty Images)

Russian Kamov Ka-52 Alligator attack helicopters fly over the Kremlin and Red Square in downtown Moscow on May 9, 2020. (Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP via Getty Images)

Egypt turned to Russia after the U.S. did not approve its request to acquire roughly two dozen F-35 fighter jets, an Egyptian military official told The Associated Press in 2019. The Russian deal for Su-35s was meant to diversify Egypt’s weapon suppliers because the U.S. has previously stopped military assistance over human rights concerns, said another official.

“Moving to diversify sources of military equipment and especially fighter jets is a direct consequence to embargos from specific countries, or monopoly of technology and refraining from technology transfer,” Lebanese Member of Parliament Wehbe Katicha, a retired Army general, told Defense News.

But the mixed fleet hasn’t significantly impacted training between Egypt and NATO members, al-Kenany said.

“Drills have been going on as scheduled between Egypt and NATO countries, but it is worth noting that I’ve never noticed a Russian aircraft in the drills with Western countries, or a Western aircraft in the drill with Russia. The only exception to this was the presence of Ka-52 with the mistral trainings.”


https://www.c4isrnet.com/battlefiel...s-fleet-of-mixed-origin/#.X5pv5IrtHlQ.twitter
 

Wilhelm II

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Three French-made Rafale fighter jets fly with other Egyptian Air Force warplanes, unseen, above Cairo on July 21, 2015. (Khaled Desouki/AFP via Getty Images)

Egypt’s fleet of military aircraft are able to share data and coordinate activity despite their mixed origins, thanks to a locally made command center, according to an Egyptian armed forces expert.

It’s rare to witness an air force flying fighter jets and helicopters of different origins, but Egypt operates aircraft from Russia, China, the United States and European nations.

“When it comes to the Egyptian Air Force in particular, it is definitely not possible for [American-made] E-2C Hawkeye 2000 early warning aircraft in service, for example, to direct the [Russian-made] MiG-29 fighters and exchange data with them, as is the case with the [American-made] F-16 and [French-made] Rafale fighters,” said Mohamed al-Kenany, a military affairs researcher and defense analyst at the Arab Forum for Analyzing Iranian Policies in Cairo.

“However, data is being shared between the different-origin aircraft through the command-and-control centers that are equipped with dedicated systems capable of linking the various radar, aircraft, sensors, reconnaissance and electronic warfare systems, and integrating all the information and data they receive into a unified system named RISC2.”

The Radar Integration and Surveillance Command Center was made by the Egyptian military’s Research and Development Department; Benha Electronics, which is affiliated with the Ministry of Military Production; the Military Technical College; and the Egyptian Air Defense Forces.


The RISC2 is an Egyptian-made system that was introduced during EDEX 2018. (Courtesy of Mohamed al-Kenany)

The RISC2 is an Egyptian-made system that was introduced during EDEX 2018. (Courtesy of Mohamed al-Kenany)

RISC2 was introduced during the 2018 Egypt Defence Expo and is meant to automate control-and-command tasks. The platform is equipped with tools for flight planning, control systems for radars and various monitoring sensors (including models from the United States, Russia, China, France, Britain and Egypt), an automatic flight-tracking system, a network management system, and cybersecurity.

Al-Kenany said in addition to linking aircraft, the system allows the military’s land and sea combat platforms to share data.

“This system enables the dynamic exchange of integrated data with various command-and-control centers, with the next generation of cyber protection systems and firewalls ... as well as the Egyptian surface-to-air missile command center to analyze and assess the risks and air threats, and [determine] the type of air defense systems needed to deal with these threats,” he added.

He hasn’t observed any problems with Egypt’s air defense systems differentiating enemy aircraft from friendly ones. “The various types of IFF [identification friend or foe systems] produced by different companies for Egypt’s armed forces are designed to be compatible with all the systems and equipment operational in the country, and hence identifying their specific frequencies and codes as friendly, which prevents friendly fires,” he explained.

To overcome delays in data sharing, the Air Force looked to the Rafale "to link aircraft of different origins during the flight, since it is equipped not only with Link 16 data links but also with other solutions for non-NATO countries to operate in integrated operational [environments] with all platforms and with friendly combat assets, and airborne command and control, which allows it to operate in harmony with modern Russian fighters operating for the Egyptian Air Force,” al-Kenany explained.

He also pointed to Egypt’s TIBA-1 communications satellite, which was launched onboard an Ariane 5 rocket in November 2019 for government communications and military purposes. He said the satellite will facilitate data sharing between Air Force fighters and helicopter of different origins.

What is Egypt flying?

In terms of Western systems, the Egyptian Air Force currently operates 24 Rafale fighter jets (and wants to double that number), 20 F-16 Block 52 fighters, 10 AH-64D Apache Longbow helicopters (with plans to double its inventory), 15 Mirage 2000 jets, and eight early warning E-2C Hawkeye planes.

From the East, the service operates 46 MiG-29M fighter jets, 46 Ka-52 Alligator armed reconnaissance helicopters, and an unknown number of Mi-24 combat multirole helicopters, which first appeared in Egyptian service in 2018. The Air Force also ordered 24 Su-35S Super Flanker jets but has only received five so far, according to Russian media.

Russian Kamov Ka-52 Alligator attack helicopters fly over the Kremlin and Red Square in downtown Moscow on May 9, 2020. (Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP via Getty Images)

Russian Kamov Ka-52 Alligator attack helicopters fly over the Kremlin and Red Square in downtown Moscow on May 9, 2020. (Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP via Getty Images)

Egypt turned to Russia after the U.S. did not approve its request to acquire roughly two dozen F-35 fighter jets, an Egyptian military official told The Associated Press in 2019. The Russian deal for Su-35s was meant to diversify Egypt’s weapon suppliers because the U.S. has previously stopped military assistance over human rights concerns, said another official.

“Moving to diversify sources of military equipment and especially fighter jets is a direct consequence to embargos from specific countries, or monopoly of technology and refraining from technology transfer,” Lebanese Member of Parliament Wehbe Katicha, a retired Army general, told Defense News.

But the mixed fleet hasn’t significantly impacted training between Egypt and NATO members, al-Kenany said.

“Drills have been going on as scheduled between Egypt and NATO countries, but it is worth noting that I’ve never noticed a Russian aircraft in the drills with Western countries, or a Western aircraft in the drill with Russia. The only exception to this was the presence of Ka-52 with the mistral trainings.”


https://www.c4isrnet.com/battlefiel...s-fleet-of-mixed-origin/#.X5pv5IrtHlQ.twitter
Always there is at least some one to say logistic nightmare
 

Gomig-21

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Always there is at least some one to say logistic nightmare
What about if what @The SC was saying that when the UAE gets the contract for the F-35, it will sell it's fleet of Mirage 2000-9 to Egypt to add them to our small fleet of 2Ks which I think is about 15 aircraft now?

They have (or at least when they ordered them) 60 Mirage 2000-9 and 80 F-16 block 60 and they paid $10 Billion for those two batches and associated equipment & training etc. That means that let's say they have 50 capable Mirages for the sake of discussion since I believe they had a couple of accidents and also attrition rate or whatever. How much would that cost the EAF to absorb 50 of the UAE's Mirage 2000-9s and all associated equipment including weapons?



They bought 33 MIrages in 1998 and then 30 more 2000-9s in 2007 for a total of 63. So they might have a bit more than 50 now that we can see the actual numbers. The 2nd batch of 30 in 2007 cost them $3.4 billion, so they are not cheap aircraft by any means! I think the majority of them (if not all of them) are equipped primarily as strike aircraft more so than A2A or air superiority. They have the RDY-2 radar and carry also the UAE version of the SCALP in the Black Shaheen. So it will be interesting to see if the EAF ends up making a deal for any of these?! France would have to approve of course and then that would take away from any potential new deals for more Rafales, or not? Not sure.
 

The SC

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What about if what @The SC was saying that when the UAE gets the contract for the F-35, it will sell it's fleet of Mirage 2000-9 to Egypt to add them to our small fleet of 2Ks which I think is about 15 aircraft now?

They have (or at least when they ordered them) 60 Mirage 2000-9 and 80 F-16 block 60 and they paid $10 Billion for those two batches and associated equipment & training etc. That means that let's say they have 50 capable Mirages for the sake of discussion since I believe they had a couple of accidents and also attrition rate or whatever. How much would that cost the EAF to absorb 50 of the UAE's Mirage 2000-9s and all associated equipment including weapons?



They bought 33 MIrages in 1998 and then 30 more 2000-9s in 2007 for a total of 63. So they might have a bit more than 50 now that we can see the actual numbers. The 2nd batch of 30 in 2007 cost them $3.4 billion, so they are not cheap aircraft by any means! I think the majority of them (if not all of them) are equipped primarily as strike aircraft more so than A2A or air superiority. They have the RDY-2 radar and carry also the UAE version of the SCALP in the Black Shaheen. So it will be interesting to see if the EAF ends up making a deal for any of these?! France would have to approve of course and then that would take away from any potential new deals for more Rafales, or not? Not sure.
You can be sure the price won't be a barrier..And some for the upgraded batch of the last thirty are almost Rafale since they share many components with the latter..
As for France..Egypt can always get that option of 12 more Rafale to soften those French..

Two years after the announcement of the modernization of the fleet Mirage 2000-9, the United Arab Emirates (UAE) have quietly signed a few days ago the contract with Dassault Aviation after very long and difficult negotiations, according to concordant sources. Estimated between 200 and 300 million euros, this contract should be announced at the upcoming Dubai Air Show, which opens on November 17th. During the last Dubai Air Show in November 2017, it was the Minister of Defense of the United Arab Emirates who announced this operation to modernize the aircraft of Dassault Aviation and its equipment. The UAE also announced plans to upgrade its fleet of 80 F-16s for $ 1.77 billion (spare parts and support).

"The Armed Forces of the United Arab Emirates have announced their intention to sign a contract with Dassault and Thales to upgrade their
أنقر للتوسيع...
Mirage 2000-9 aircraft," said in a statement in 2017. His Excellency Major-General Ishaq Saleh Al-Balushi, Chief of the executive direction of industries and development of the Ministry of Defense.
.
"Dassault Aviation, an unrivaled partner of the United Arab Emirates for more than 40 years, is fully committed to meeting the operational needs and supporting the strategic challenges of the UAE air forces in the coming decades," said the CEO of the United States. aircraft manufacturer, Eric Trappier, quoted in a statement issued two years ago. The Mirage 2000-9, which is a versatile combat aircraft (air-to-air and air-to-ground), was commanded by the Emirati only.

In addition, the UAE also signed in March the acquisition from France of two Gowind corvettes manufactured by Naval Group . for an amount of approximately 750 million euros.


Estimé entre 200 et 300 millions d'euros, ce contrat devrait être annoncé lors du prochain salon aéronautique de Dubaï, qui ouvre ses portes le 17 novembre



https://www.latribune.fr/entreprise...nfwehB5tjL-HnlvTD4YKbZwwpyJZWea6SfzsOQqNVMh8M


The modernization of the nineteen Mirage 2000-9 single-seaters and the twelve Mirage 2000-9D two-seaters should make it possible to carry these fighter jets until around 2035. The avionics will be reviewed and corrected, and so will the weaponry. The SNECMA M53-P2 enginess will be removed and completely rejuvenated.

https://www.avionslegendaires.net/2019/11/actu/laviation-emiratie-va-moderniser-ses-mirage-2000-9/

That leaves 33 Mirage 2000-9 to be sold first.. than a few years later another batch composed of the modernized ones..
 
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The SC

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Year 2012

The UAE is said to be continuing talks with Egypt under a French supervision to sell it some Mirage 2000-9 fighter jets in service with the UAE Air Force (UAEAF)

http://tacticalreport.com/view_news/UAE_Egypt_and_talks_over_the_Mirage_2000-9/1580


The UAE had 68 .. lost 1 in Yemen..

The talk was about 32 Mirage 2k-9

22 Mirage 2000 EAD single seat multi-role.
8 Mirage 2000 RAD for aerial reconnaissance and espionage missions.
6 Mirage 2000 DAD two-seat training.
20 Mirage 2000-9 single seat.
12-seat Mirage 2000-9 D two-seat training


The 32 to be sold to Egypt are equipped with:

- Shehab laser targeting pod (a variant of the Damocles)

- Nahar navigation pod

- RDY-2 radar

- Countermeasures system designated "IMEWS"

Also Equipped with the"Black Shaheen" cruise missile

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/be/Scalp1.gif


MBDA MICA IR/R



Matra and Super 530D

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/b5/Mirage_2000c_1.jpg


AM.39 Exocet



AS-30L laser guided missile



Mk.82




Thomson-CSF RDY (Radar Doppler Multi-target) radar







@Gomig-21
 
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Gomig-21

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What a sweet bird. I remember all the talk that 30 something of these were coming to Egypt for some reason I think it was to make room for possibly the Su-30 or something going to the UAE. Now we're back at it again. This would be a superb addition to the EAF's fleet and we're the only ones in the neighborhood like you mentioned who can absorb them and add them to our own oldies,
 

Wilhelm II

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What about if what @The SC was saying that when the UAE gets the contract for the F-35, it will sell it's fleet of Mirage 2000-9 to Egypt to add them to our small fleet of 2Ks which I think is about 15 aircraft now?

They have (or at least when they ordered them) 60 Mirage 2000-9 and 80 F-16 block 60 and they paid $10 Billion for those two batches and associated equipment & training etc. That means that let's say they have 50 capable Mirages for the sake of discussion since I believe they had a couple of accidents and also attrition rate or whatever. How much would that cost the EAF to absorb 50 of the UAE's Mirage 2000-9s and all associated equipment including weapons?



They bought 33 MIrages in 1998 and then 30 more 2000-9s in 2007 for a total of 63. So they might have a bit more than 50 now that we can see the actual numbers. The 2nd batch of 30 in 2007 cost them $3.4 billion, so they are not cheap aircraft by any means! I think the majority of them (if not all of them) are equipped primarily as strike aircraft more so than A2A or air superiority. They have the RDY-2 radar and carry also the UAE version of the SCALP in the Black Shaheen. So it will be interesting to see if the EAF ends up making a deal for any of these?! France would have to approve of course and then that would take away from any potential new deals for more Rafales, or not? Not sure.
To my brothers I want to stop my activity in pdf and you know why
With the best wishes for all my brothers in pdf and Arabs I'm out good luck my friends
 
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Gomig-21

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To my brothers I want to stop my activity in pdf and you know why
With the best wishes for all my brothers in pdf and Arabs I'm out good luck my friends
Sorry to hear that ya Basha, but it's completely understandable. I saw that last set of exchanges you had and I wasn't surprised at the way you were treated with that shameless arrogance and filthy condescension from at least that one member who for some reason thinks it's ok for him to talk to others in that manner. The policing around here is not done properly, that's for sure.

But good luck ya habibi, hopefully you just need a break and when you're ready, come back and hang with us in he Arab sections more so than the ones that the others "complain about Arabs" sections if you know what I mean. That's what I try to do for the most part. Salaam ya ma3alem.
 

Lord Of Gondor

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Defencereview Greece(i enjoy articles on that site as well) also has an article on the topic. Really impressive what EAF have done to make sure that all the various types complement the others.
 

Gomig-21

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Defencereview Greece(i enjoy articles on that site as well) also has an article on the topic. Really impressive what EAF have done to make sure that all the various types complement the others.
That's why myself and a lot of my brothers are always talking about the IAF and how there should be a lot more interaction between the two air forces because of these exact similarities in varieties and how the IAF has been able to make them work so well for so long with a much larger sample of diversified aircraft, including the Russian-built AWACs. While the EAF uses the 10 E-2C Haweyes, it has a couple of C-130 Compass Calls for electronic attack and all these, along with the different makes of fighters need to be connected in all aspects and especially electronically and not just by Comms. I'm sure the IAF has its entire system down to a T with some of the best technologies out there. That's really why I've been pushing that idea that the two countries should really get together a lot more and share that experience because of that similarity.

Then if this dream of ours comes to fruition and the EAF ends up with 30 or even double that number of Mirage 2000's from the UAE, then our two fleets will have A LOT more similarities!
 

Gomig-21

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who gave them the money for all this toys
Why do you always ask the same stupid question all the time? Oh I know why, you have an agenda. I'll tell you what, why don't you take that question and go bash Egypt with the rest of your hateful buddies in that thread you just opened up about some billions given to Egypt by the GCC countries. Then you can all wallow in your sorrow and contempt and hatred of Egypt and Egyptians. We're discussing a specific topic here no need for for you and any of your polluting haters to infect it.
 

The SC

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That's why myself and a lot of my brothers are always talking about the IAF and how there should be a lot more interaction between the two air forces because of these exact similarities in varieties and how the IAF has been able to make them work so well for so long with a much larger sample of diversified aircraft, including the Russian-built AWACs. While the EAF uses the 10 E-2C Haweyes, it has a couple of C-130 Compass Calls for electronic attack and all these, along with the different makes of fighters need to be connected in all aspects and especially electronically and not just by Comms. I'm sure the IAF has its entire system down to a T with some of the best technologies out there. That's really why I've been pushing that idea that the two countries should really get together a lot more and share that experience because of that similarity.

Then if this dream of ours comes to fruition and the EAF ends up with 30 or even double that number of Mirage 2000's from the UAE, then our two fleets will have A LOT more similarities!
And this RISC2..is V.2 ..
Sorry to hear that ya Basha, but it's completely understandable. I saw that last set of exchanges you had and I wasn't surprised at the way you were treated with that shameless arrogance and filthy condescension from at least that one member who for some reason thinks it's ok for him to talk to others in that manner. The policing around here is not done properly, that's for sure.

But good luck ya habibi, hopefully you just need a break and when you're ready, come back and hang with us in he Arab sections more so than the ones that the others "complain about Arabs" sections if you know what I mean. That's what I try to do for the most part. Salaam ya ma3alem.
In some cases, psychiatrists advise their patients to write down the things that cause problems for them as a form of relief..
 
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