What's new

How do Pakistanis and Indians Perceive Each Other?

Goritoes

SENIOR MEMBER
Jan 20, 2021
5,647
0
8,706
Country
Pakistan
Location
United States
Why do most Pakistanis believe in Ghazwa Hind then? even top politicians in our parliament and prominent sportsmen endorse it.


My point is we aren't much better.
I don't think you are smart enough to carry that discussion because you don't know the difference between a Mentality of a nation to achieve a certain goal, or a religious prophecy (contested), Pakistani's on a nationalistic ideological way have no ill will against the rest of India, this hadith of Gazwa-e-Hind is controversial and contested, and I don't want to go if that hadith is Sahih or Zaef. Pakistani's and Indians maybe similar is many things but you can deny the genocidal tendencies of Indians not just for Pakistani's but Muslims in General.
 

Bleek

SENIOR MEMBER
Dec 21, 2021
4,867
5
6,189
Country
Pakistan
Location
United Kingdom
There is a fine line between this and hating someone out of pure ignorance and because you perceive them as "infidels". Also, Indians can use what you said to justify their hatred for everyday Muslims and Pakistanis, see how that works
Honestly I couldn't care what Pajeets hate or don't hate.

Majority of Muslims in Pakistan are nothing like Hindutva. They've always believed in Islam and their beliefs aren't reliant on politics, religious demographics or insecurity. They are just sometimes slightly misinformed due to ignorance.

Hindutva was born directly out of hate and insecurity. Hindus have always largely been secular with relatively weak beliefs, but purely due to their hatred of Muslims, radicalism based on Muslim hate has grown, and even their level of religious belief and the want for a Hindu Republic is copied from Muslims. And due to their historical subjugation they entertain themselves with fantasy beliefs such as love jihad, the Kaaba was once a Hindu temple, and half the world was conquered by Hindus.

Muslims are Muslim because they actually have firm belief in the core principles of their religion.

Hindutvas are radicals purely out of hatred and insecurity. Even most Hindus don't believe that cow BS Hinduism preaches but they'll force themselves due to their hatred.
 

Catalystic

FULL MEMBER
May 17, 2022
1,877
1
1,504
Country
Pakistan
Location
Canada
Are you implying that I was trying to do that? I'm just trying to say that we aren't much better than them like we make ourselves out to be.
Big difference.
We’re conservative muslims.
They’re majority hindutva…..if that difference seems minor to you please try visiting hindutva, take your women with you…..lets see what happens then
What kind of shit are you really trying to sell? As another said, LPC
 

Zornix

BANNED
Aug 14, 2022
381
-3
487
Country
Pakistan
Location
United States
Indians maybe similar is many things but you can deny the genocidal tendencies of Indians not just for Pakistani's but Muslims in General.
Barking dogs seldom bite, some random brainwashed slum dweller sitting in India with genocidal fantasies against us should be the last of our concerns. Wanting to take over a country and forcefully convert them to your worldview against their will is as much of a despicable thought, even many educated Pakistanis living abroad subscribe to Ghazwa Hind nonsense. Indian Hindus also view their fantasies of murdering and torturing Muslims and non-Hindus as a "religious duty".
 

Goritoes

SENIOR MEMBER
Jan 20, 2021
5,647
0
8,706
Country
Pakistan
Location
United States
Barking dogs seldom bite, some random brainwashed slum dweller sitting in India with genocidal fantasies against us should be the last of our concerns. Wanting to take over a country and forcefully convert them to your worldview against their will is as much of a despicable thought, even many educated Pakistanis living abroad subscribe to Ghazwa Hind nonsense. Indian Hindus also view their fantasies of murdering and torturing Muslims and non-Hindus as a "religious duty".
You are mixing two separate things.
 

Mirzali Khan

SENIOR MEMBER
Sep 25, 2020
3,669
-3
4,854
Country
Pakistan
Location
United States
I was reading through this interesting book about how Pakistanis and Indians have come to perceive each other and their countries over the years, I felt like sharing some interesting excerpts I came across.

"One of my colleagues, Mariam, a twenty-two-year-old graduate from the Lahore University of Management Sciences (LUMS), told me she had hated India. She had hated it so much that when her father was posted to Delhi as a defence attaché, she had told him, ‘Abba, take us anywhere else in the world, why does it have to be India?’ For months, she and her sisters dwelled in this misery. Her younger sister, Maham, would cry her eyes out every night. She would say, ‘Hum India kyun ja rahe hain? Udhar tou sarey kafir hotey hain . . . woh tou achey nai hotey.’ (Why are we going to India? Only infidels live there. They aren’t good people.) Maham was of a tender age of five."

"Another student I worked with in a school had started crying hysterically when I passed around a picture of a Hindu deity; she was in Class 6, studying in an upper-middle-class school in Lahore that I worked in. When I asked her what happened, she told me her eyes had sinned; that she would now go to hell because of what she had seen."

"Later that year, when I took a few students with me to India for CAP’s Exchange-for-Change programme, one of the Indian schools had received us with garlands and music. The principal had moved forward to place a tika on our foreheads. Three of the Pakistani students had begun to cry; they turned and asked me if this meant they had become Hindu. They said they had heard Hindus would forcibly convert Muslims to their religion; was this their fate too?"

"This time, my question regarding what was special about India was received with pin-drop silence. Then a few children at the back started to snicker. A small girl nervously raised her hand and in a meek voice asked, ‘Shahrukh Khan?’ The others began to roll from side to side with laughter. ‘He’s a Pakistani, stupid! He’s Muslim. Muslims can’t be Indian,’ said one child. Another overconfident student got up from the middle row and declared, ‘India has nothing! They will all go to hell!’

" Adnan, a ten-year-old student of seventh standard, was sitting amongst these children, armed with his own jokes to crack. ‘Indians don’t cut their hair, Ma’am,’ ‘They are dirty people,’ ‘They are cheaters; that’s how they won the cricket match!’ Though not every child participated in the mockery and many perhaps only did so due to peer pressure, for several initial weeks that I returned to the school, I was received with the same sarcastic expressions, crude comments and empty-handed students. Many of the students told me they hated Indians, that they didn’t want to write them any letters. No one in the room had ever been to India and the majority of the students had never met an Indian either. However, the hatred they expressed seemed almost personal, and incredibly powerful."

"These students have been nurtured in a Pakistan that has fought several wars with India; some whose fathers were in the Pakistan Army would have felt the direct impact of the rivalry across the border. They have also heard about Indian soldiers committing atrocities at the LoC, of harassing Muslims in Indian Kashmir. They have been told, just as I was, that India took away not only Kashmir but also East Pakistan. Many recent conspiracy theories state that India is behind the terror attacks in Pakistan, that they are funding terrorist outfits so that Pakistan becomes unstable and eventually collapses under its own weight. These theories are becoming increasingly popular, so much so that auto-rickshaws across Lahore publicly carry signs that read, se rishta kya? Nafrat ka, intikam is our relationship with India, but that of hatred and revenge.) Perhaps it was this relationship that the students were emulating and displaying in their classrooms, too. In fact, it wasn’t just the students; school administrators and teachers also showed similar, though more subdued, sentiments."

"I had toured many schools across Lahore before finding three to work with. Most schools wanted to have nothing to do with an exchange programme that was with India and we had received many rejections. The tagline of the project—‘to celebrate similarities and appreciate differences’ between India and Pakistan—angered most people. A head administrator of one of the largest upper-middle-class private school networks in Pakistan told me that by suggesting such a programme, I was challenging the Two-Nation Theory. Why would we want children to explore the similarities between the two nations when there was nothing similar in the first place? After all, that was why Pakistan had been created, because we were two separate nations that could no longer live together. She told me the project was a waste of time and I should instead initiate it with China. When I told her the cultures of China and Pakistan were very different, she told me I didn’t realize how different those treacherous Indians were from the pure and innocent Pakistanis, and then politely asked me to leave."

"Over time and under the fear of their principal, the students began to jot down their thoughts and ideas. Messages started to pour in and while several brilliant letters and poems were composed, giving us a breath of relief, others were tarnished with disgust and scornful remarks. ‘India is the worst country on earth,’ ‘We hope you die,’ ‘We will never come to India!’


Are we really this hateful, ignorant, and intolerant? Pakistanis would have you believe that we actually "love" India and that it's the evil and hateful Indians that hate us for no reason. That it is just a false perception of us and propaganda. Reading through this book, it seems we are as hateful and ignorant vis a vis our neighbors if not more. I could also share some excerpts from the book about how the Indian students perceived the Pakistanis and what they said.

The diaspora get along very well


The different between Pakistani's and Indians, is that Pakistani's only want Kashmir back, Pakistani's don't wish death and destruction upon the rest of India, while Indians would watch the whole Pakistan burn and watch every Pakistani die in pain so they can take over the country.

That is why they are ahead!

Sorry mate, but no Pakistani watches Bollywood shit.

What is this :rofl:

 
Last edited:

lastofthepatriots

ELITE MEMBER
Aug 16, 2015
11,036
-18
23,593
Country
Pakistan
Location
United States

One_Nation

BANNED
Sep 3, 2021
1,137
-2
927
Country
Pakistan
Location
Australia
I was reading through this interesting book about how Pakistanis and Indians have come to perceive each other and their countries over the years, I felt like sharing some interesting excerpts I came across.

"One of my colleagues, Mariam, a twenty-two-year-old graduate from the Lahore University of Management Sciences (LUMS), told me she had hated India. She had hated it so much that when her father was posted to Delhi as a defence attaché, she had told him, ‘Abba, take us anywhere else in the world, why does it have to be India?’ For months, she and her sisters dwelled in this misery. Her younger sister, Maham, would cry her eyes out every night. She would say, ‘Hum India kyun ja rahe hain? Udhar tou sarey kafir hotey hain . . . woh tou achey nai hotey.’ (Why are we going to India? Only infidels live there. They aren’t good people.) Maham was of a tender age of five."

"Another student I worked with in a school had started crying hysterically when I passed around a picture of a Hindu deity; she was in Class 6, studying in an upper-middle-class school in Lahore that I worked in. When I asked her what happened, she told me her eyes had sinned; that she would now go to hell because of what she had seen."

"Later that year, when I took a few students with me to India for CAP’s Exchange-for-Change programme, one of the Indian schools had received us with garlands and music. The principal had moved forward to place a tika on our foreheads. Three of the Pakistani students had begun to cry; they turned and asked me if this meant they had become Hindu. They said they had heard Hindus would forcibly convert Muslims to their religion; was this their fate too?"

"This time, my question regarding what was special about India was received with pin-drop silence. Then a few children at the back started to snicker. A small girl nervously raised her hand and in a meek voice asked, ‘Shahrukh Khan?’ The others began to roll from side to side with laughter. ‘He’s a Pakistani, stupid! He’s Muslim. Muslims can’t be Indian,’ said one child. Another overconfident student got up from the middle row and declared, ‘India has nothing! They will all go to hell!’

" Adnan, a ten-year-old student of seventh standard, was sitting amongst these children, armed with his own jokes to crack. ‘Indians don’t cut their hair, Ma’am,’ ‘They are dirty people,’ ‘They are cheaters; that’s how they won the cricket match!’ Though not every child participated in the mockery and many perhaps only did so due to peer pressure, for several initial weeks that I returned to the school, I was received with the same sarcastic expressions, crude comments and empty-handed students. Many of the students told me they hated Indians, that they didn’t want to write them any letters. No one in the room had ever been to India and the majority of the students had never met an Indian either. However, the hatred they expressed seemed almost personal, and incredibly powerful."

"These students have been nurtured in a Pakistan that has fought several wars with India; some whose fathers were in the Pakistan Army would have felt the direct impact of the rivalry across the border. They have also heard about Indian soldiers committing atrocities at the LoC, of harassing Muslims in Indian Kashmir. They have been told, just as I was, that India took away not only Kashmir but also East Pakistan. Many recent conspiracy theories state that India is behind the terror attacks in Pakistan, that they are funding terrorist outfits so that Pakistan becomes unstable and eventually collapses under its own weight. These theories are becoming increasingly popular, so much so that auto-rickshaws across Lahore publicly carry signs that read, se rishta kya? Nafrat ka, intikam is our relationship with India, but that of hatred and revenge.) Perhaps it was this relationship that the students were emulating and displaying in their classrooms, too. In fact, it wasn’t just the students; school administrators and teachers also showed similar, though more subdued, sentiments."

"I had toured many schools across Lahore before finding three to work with. Most schools wanted to have nothing to do with an exchange programme that was with India and we had received many rejections. The tagline of the project—‘to celebrate similarities and appreciate differences’ between India and Pakistan—angered most people. A head administrator of one of the largest upper-middle-class private school networks in Pakistan told me that by suggesting such a programme, I was challenging the Two-Nation Theory. Why would we want children to explore the similarities between the two nations when there was nothing similar in the first place? After all, that was why Pakistan had been created, because we were two separate nations that could no longer live together. She told me the project was a waste of time and I should instead initiate it with China. When I told her the cultures of China and Pakistan were very different, she told me I didn’t realize how different those treacherous Indians were from the pure and innocent Pakistanis, and then politely asked me to leave."

"Over time and under the fear of their principal, the students began to jot down their thoughts and ideas. Messages started to pour in and while several brilliant letters and poems were composed, giving us a breath of relief, others were tarnished with disgust and scornful remarks. ‘India is the worst country on earth,’ ‘We hope you die,’ ‘We will never come to India!’


Are we really this hateful, ignorant, and intolerant? Pakistanis would have you believe that we actually "love" India and that it's the evil and hateful Indians that hate us for no reason. That it is just a false perception of us and propaganda. Reading through this book, it seems we are as hateful and ignorant vis a vis our neighbors if not more. I could also share some excerpts from the book about how the Indian students perceived the Pakistanis and what they said.
You have no idea how much Indians are brainwashed against Pakistan in their schools.
 

fatman17

PDF THINK TANK: CONSULTANT
Apr 24, 2007
31,854
93
38,141
Country
Pakistan
Location
Pakistan
My interactions with indians when visiting India 🇮🇳 have been most cordial. Even the airport immigration staff were very friendly especially at New Delhi. The police reporting was OK except had to wait a long time ⌛️.
 

Musings

FULL MEMBER
May 14, 2020
651
0
4,485
Country
Pakistan
Location
United Kingdom
My interactions with indians when visiting India 🇮🇳 have been most cordial. Even the airport immigration staff were very friendly especially at New Delhi. The police reporting was OK except had to wait a long time ⌛️.
They will have been sir. Just the handful of trolls on here do more damage than they can ever imagine - portraying and behaving as if they are the universal voice for 1.2 billion - when in the real world there isnt the hostility propagated on here. Those Indians i have had interaction - hospitable, humour and mutual respect.
 

AlKardai

FULL MEMBER
Mar 24, 2022
1,243
0
1,719
Country
United Kingdom
Location
United Kingdom
@LeGenD

For the love of god, ban this mfer
Like I've stated before, the divergence in social behaviour b/w an Indian and a Pakistani w.r.t each other starts at childhood itself.

https://defence.pk/pdf/threads/an-indian-student-in-pakistan.744526/post-13834376

Indoctrination of kids has been an important characteristic of Islam, so it's not surprising Pakistan follows the same by fueling hate against Hindus in childhood itself.
Ofcourse there may be some exceptions to it.
 

LeGenD

MODERATOR
Aug 28, 2006
13,833
132
17,572
Country
Pakistan
Location
Pakistan
@Cheepek

Pakistani are not indoctrinated to hate Hindu in schools, colleges and universities. Islam does not teach Muslims to hate Hindu either but to NOT marry and intermingle with them.

How about you focus on how Hindutva treat Muslims in India?
 

Turingsage

BANNED
Sep 28, 2014
2,308
-23
3,612
Country
India
Location
United Kingdom
There's nothing to fix, hating India and its majority radical Hindutva population is a good quality.
Not that any Pakistani would like the actual truth, but one tries !

n India, Hindu support for Modi’s party varies by region and is tied to beliefs about diet and language​

BY JONATHAN EVANS

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi celebrates the political victory of the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) on May 23, 2019, at the BJP headquarters in New Delhi.
Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi celebrates the political victory of the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) on May 23, 2019, at the BJP headquarters in New Delhi. (Atul Loke/Getty Images)
India’s ruling party, the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP), is sometimes said to prioritize Hindu interests. Hindus were the religious group most likely to say they voted for the BJP in the country’s most recent parliamentary election, but there are vast differences in how Hindus from different regions voted, according to a recent Pew Research Center survey of nearly 30,000 Indian adults. These regional political differences are connected to Hindu attitudes on a range of issues including language, diet and religious observance.
How we did this
A map showing that Hindus in Southern India far less likely to support Modi's BJP
In 2019, roughly half of Hindu voters (49%) supported the BJP, giving the party a majority in the Lok Sabha – India’s lower house of parliament – and allowing Prime Minister Narendra Modi a second term to lead the country.
Among Hindus, the BJP received some of its highest vote shares in the Northern (68%) and Central (65%) regions of the country, which include India’s capital, Delhi, and its most populous state, Uttar Pradesh. By comparison, 46% of Hindu voters in the East and just 19% in the South say they voted for the BJP, according to the Center’s survey.
In the South, significant shares of Hindu voters (20%) say they instead supported the Indian National Congress (INC), which has led the country for most of the years since its independence. Regional parties, including the Telangana Rashtra Samithi and the Yuvajana Sramika Rythu Congress Party, also received significant vote shares among Southern Hindus (both 11%). Southern states tend to have higher per capita income and have experienced faster economic growth than most Northern and Central states.
Differences in voting patterns between Southern Hindus and those who live in the Northern and Central regions are part of broader regional differences among Hindus in India. For example, Hindu nationalist sentiments appear to have a smaller foothold in the South. Nationally, 64% of Hindus in India say being a Hindu is very important to being truly Indian. But while this share is as high as 83% in the Central region, it falls to 42% in the South.
A map showing that Southern Hindus are the least likely to say religion is very important
A closely related sentiment is the importance of the Hindi language to national identity: The majority of Hindus in the Central (87%) and Northern (71%) regions say that speaking Hindi is very important to being truly Indian, while just 27% of Southern Hindus say this. Among the dozens of commonly spoken Indian languages, Hindi is the most widespread. However, while it is often spoken in the Northern and Central parts of the country, it is far less common in the South.
Views on the connection between the Hindu religion, Hindi language and Indian identity are highly correlated with support for the BJP – a party that has supported making Hindi the national language and has enacted laws (such as restricting cow slaughter) that are seen as favorable to Hindus.
Indeed, attitudes about cow slaughter and beef consumption mark another division between the South and other regions of the country. Many Hindus consider cows sacred animals, but there are mixed views about whether eating beef disqualifies a person from being a Hindu. Most Hindus in the Northern and Central regions (both 83%) say someone who eats beef cannot be Hindu, compared with half of Southern Hindus. And attitudes about beef and Hindu identity are correlated with support for the BJP: Hindus who say they voted for the BJP are more likely than other Hindu voters to say someone who eats beef cannot be Hindu (77% vs. 66%).
Southern Hindus also differ in their religious observance. For instance, while 92% of Hindus in the Central region say religion is very important in their life, the share is substantially lower among Southern Hindus (68%). More religious Hindus tend to support the country’s ruling party: About half of Hindus who say religion is very important in their lives (52%) voted for the BJP in 2019, compared with around a third of Hindus (32%) who say religion is less important in their lives.
Views of the BJP differ along other religious lines in India, too. Among minority religions analyzed in the Center’s report, Jains appear to be the only group who strongly embrace the BJP. While the survey did not include enough Jain voters to report how they voted in the 2019 election, 70% of Jains said in a separate question that they feel closest to the BJP, regardless of whether they voted in the last election. Meanwhile, other religious groups showed less support for the ruling party: Fewer than a third of Buddhists (29%), Muslims (19%), Sikhs (19%) and Christians (10%) say they voted for the BJP in the 2019 parliamentary election.
Many voters from minority religions opted to vote for parties other than the BJP or INC. For example, 14% of Buddhists say they voted for the Bahujan Samaj Party (BSP), a national party focused primarily on the welfare of lower castes and minority religions; 89% of Buddhists are members of Scheduled Castes. Support for regional parties is also tied to religion. For instance, 16% of Sikhs say they voted for Shiromani Akali Dal (SAD) in 2019. SAD is a regional party representing Punjabi interests; according to the most recent national census, conducted in 2011, 77% of India’s Sikhs live in Punjab.

Pew Research
 

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Total: 1, Members: 0, Guests: 1)


Top Bottom