• Tuesday, March 19, 2019

How China pipped India at Nepal post: Former Indian Ambassador

Discussion in 'China & Far East' started by Raphael, Oct 18, 2015.

  1. Raphael

    Raphael SENIOR MEMBER

    Messages:
    3,072
    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2012
    Ratings:
    +10 / 8,598 / -6
    Country:
    China
    Location:
    China
    How China pipped India at Nepal post | Asia Times

    As Nepal arrives on the South Asian political landscape as its brand new secular, democratic republic, it is ‘Communist’ China that is in celebratory mood. India is sulking. Beijing is obviously pleased with the election of a communist leader as the prime minister of Nepal, who, by the way, also used to be a ‘Maoist’ at one time in his long chequered political life. The contrast could not be sharper.

    Beijing looks forward with optimism that the new political dispensation under the leadership of Khadga Prashad Oli as Nepal’s new prime minister augurs well for an intensification of the bilateral cooperation. It is a fresh beginning insofar as Nepal is returning to constitutional rule.

    First and foremost, Beijing knows it can depend on Oli to do everything possible to ensure that Nepal’s territory is not used by Tibetan exiles in India to infiltrate the Chinese region and destabilize it.

    Beijing enjoys rapport with all the three major parties that comprise the new coalition that catapulted Oli to power, notwithstanding their mutual contradictions. These contradictions need to be carefully managed but it trusts that Oli is an experienced politician.

    The Chinese diplomacy worked tenaciously to court all the three coalition constituents on parallel tracks – communists, Maoists and ‘royalists’ – in a far-sighted approach to cast its net wide among the disparate political forces. It met with stunning success. Do not be surprised if China now reaches out to the Madhesi politicians of Indian origin in the Terai region as well (whom New Delhi regards as its ‘pocket borough’) – that is, if it has not quietly begun the spade work already.

    China too counseled Nepal’s political parties to somehow bring the protracted 8-year period without a constitution to a speedy end, but it did not suggest what the constitution should contain. It stuck to its consistent neighborhood policy that such matters are the internal affairs of the country concerned.

    On the contrary, New Delhi took a prescriptive approach and all accounts suggest it disfavored the election of Oli, who is well-known for his staunchly nationalistic stance. India’s main pocket of influence in mainstream politics, Nepali Congress, has been reduced to the opposition.

    Nonetheless, it is not necessarily the case that China is raring to exploit India’s travails in Kathmandu with a zero sum mindset. Beijing stood by watching the unseemly spectacle of the stand-off between India and Nepal without fueling it. It probably could have tried to fish in the troubled waters, but apparently did not.

    Quite obviously, China realizes that despite the flawed Indian policies, there are umbilical cords that tie Nepal to India, two neighboring countries with majority Hindu population. There is striking similarity with China’s approach to Central Asian countries, where Russia preserves great influence.

    To be sure, Oli’s top priority will still be to mend fences with India, because in the ultimate analysis Nepal, a landlocked country, cannot do without India’s goodwill and will be sensitive to India’s vital interests and concerns. Suffice it to say, it is far from the case that China fails to understand India’s special interests in Nepal.

    Having said that, India’s hands are full, clawing its way back on the greasy pole in Kathmandu – and that is not going to be an easy thing to do, requiring much patience, tact and tenacity. The Modi government has wounded Nepali national pride with its overbearing ‘Big Brother’ attitude, and a wave of anti-Indian feelings is sweeping across that country.

    That, in turn, leaves China with a free hand to expand its ‘win-win’ cooperation with Nepal. China will feel relatively free of Indian interference to stymie its bilateral cooperation with Nepal. In China’s assessment, as a Xinhua commentary noted on Monday,

    • Oli, 63, believed to be a hardliner in Nepali politics, has said that he is committed to preserve the country’s national unity, sovereignty and territorial integrity. He has assured the Nepali people that he will strengthen bilateral ties with China and India, Nepal’s prosperous neighbors.
    • During an earlier interview with Xinhua, Oli had expressed his commitment to maintaining Nepal’s long-standing one-China policy, saying Nepal will not allow any external forces in its territory to work against China’s core interests.
    China’s comfort level with Oli’s leadership becomes self-evident – the quiet confidence that China can hope to enjoy a level playing field in Kathmandu, thanks to the staunchly nationalistic leadership of Oli, which will not countenance Indian attempts to dictate to him his government’s China policies.

    Paradoxically, the Modi government unwittingly created a dream wicket in Kathmandu for Chinese diplomacy. It can do with some serious introspection as to the root causes why this situation came about.

    For a start, in any rethink of Indian policies, there is an urgent need to frame the question: Is there scope to work with China instead of competing with China, in Nepal?

    Significantly, the Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesperson’s statement on Monday congratulating Oli’s election as prime minister emphasized the priorities of “new progress in national unity, stability and development” in Nepal. The sequencing is quite significant – stressing the crucial importance of national unity as an imperative for Nepal’s overall stability, which in turn becomes essential for advancing the development agenda.

    Doesn’t it bear uncanny resemblance to what India too says it desires to see happening in Nepal? Of course, China also favors an inclusive political culture in Nepal that strengthens national unity. Nepal’s unity and integrity and its development can be a common concern for China and India.

    A radical shift in the Indian thinking is called for with regard to the development of its border states bordering Nepal (Bihar, Uttar Pradesh, West Bengal and Sikkim), by making it a template of regional development. China’s ‘win-win’ approach provides a model.

    Such an outlook can only strengthen regional security and stability, while also enhancing India’s ‘influence’ in Nepal. India’s accent in the near future ought to be on stability and development rather than on ill-conceived notions of regional hegemony or obsession with ‘influence’.

    What India’s futile standoff with Nepal revealed is that the old tools of neighborhood policy predicated on the unilateral assumptions of its regional dominance, have become outdated and irrelevant in the contemporary setting. India is no doubt the preeminent power in its region by virtue of its size and comprehensive national power, but that does not make it the dominant power.

    Nepal is not an isolated case of outdated Indian thinking. The snub administered by the Maldives to the External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj earlier this week, telling India to back off from interfering in its domestic politics, is an eye-opener, too.

    As a matter of fact, how Sri Lanka drew a red line forcing India to abdicate its traditional role in the Tamil problem also shows that small countries can be tough neighbors in safeguarding their sovereignty and independence. Ironically, Modi government has virtually dumped India’s legitimate interests in the Sri Lankan Tamil problem. The present Sri Lankan leadership openly brags that Modi government is the ‘most Lanka-friendly Indian government’ that Colombo ever came across in history.

    The standoff with Nepal, Maldivian snub, backtracking vis-à-vis Colombo – these unhappy slices of experience during the Modi govenrment’s 18-month long tenure should be made the input for ‘new thinking’ on regional cooperation adapted to the needs of the emergent world order.

    The fundamental issue is that – be it Nepal, Maldives, or Sri Lanka – the obsession with China’s growing influence in the region has warped the Indian thinking, which in turn prevents Indian diplomacy from coming on its own to realize its full potential.

    India’s ‘influence’ in the region will depend on its ability to emerge as a model of harmony and development.

    Influence, like respect, cannot be extracted. It must engender itself. Does Modi’s India attract Nepal or Maldives as a worthy model worth emulating? That is the bottom line.
     
  2. BuddhaPalm

    BuddhaPalm BANNED

    Messages:
    913
    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2014
    Ratings:
    +0 / 2,018 / -16
    Country:
    China
    Location:
    China
    Nepal needs China to help defend against India. From lower Nepal, our tanks can roll across flat north Indian plains into New Delhi.
     
  3. Beast

    Beast ELITE MEMBER

    Messages:
    14,672
    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2011
    Ratings:
    +6 / 35,539 / -30
    Country:
    China
    Location:
    China
    CHina need to make sure the Sri Lanka scenario will not happen again. The Indian uses dirty trick to oust a China pro president. China now need to ensure those who behind the scene attempt to install a pro Indian prime minister of Nepal will silence. Large money and weapon need to transfer to Nepal to secure the new president position.
     
  4. GR!FF!N

    GR!FF!N ELITE MEMBER

    Messages:
    8,706
    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2012
    Ratings:
    +11 / 8,408 / -15
    Country:
    India
    Location:
    India
    atleast settle your "Disputes" with Nepal before rolling the tanks.. :lol:

    Sri Lankans kicked out "Corrupt" Rajapakse..I wonder why China always gets attracted to these kind of people(i.e. corrupted)
     
  5. Beast

    Beast ELITE MEMBER

    Messages:
    14,672
    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2011
    Ratings:
    +6 / 35,539 / -30
    Country:
    China
    Location:
    China
    Liar liar. Nepal will firmly in China hand and any RAW spies landed in Nepal will be immediately hunt down and killed by Chinese spies.

    Indian spy's role alleged in Sri Lankan president's election defeat| Reuters
     
  6. hexagonsnow

    hexagonsnow FULL MEMBER

    Messages:
    264
    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2015
    Ratings:
    +0 / 650 / -0
    Country:
    China
    Location:
    China
    That is why indians gets hatred by neighbors.
     
  7. Economic superpower

    Economic superpower FULL MEMBER

    Messages:
    1,266
    Joined:
    May 6, 2014
    Ratings:
    +0 / 5,293 / -5
    Country:
    China
    Location:
    China
  8. ahojunk

    ahojunk INT'L MOD

    Messages:
    5,147
    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2014
    Ratings:
    +6 / 13,592 / -0
    Country:
    Australia
    Location:
    Australia
    An opinion piece in "The Hindu".

    ---------------
    It’s time to be a good neighbour
    OPINION » COMMENT
    Updated: October 17, 2015 00:55 IST
    NIRUPAMA RAO
    ATUL POKHAREL

    17TH_NEPAL2_2587354f.jpg
    Picture shows trucks stranded at Birganj, a town on the Nepal-India border, after hundreds of Madhesis protested against Nepal's new Constitution.

    As long as the Nepalis perceive the outcomes of the special relationship between India and Nepal to be unfair, it will be difficult to secure their cooperation. It is up to Mr. Modi to change that

    It has been a difficult six months for the Nepali people. This week, they faced another humanitarian crisis because the flow of fuel and supplies from India stopped. Newspapers reported that hospitals and clinics ran out of supplies, restaurants and businesses closed, neighbours scrambled for firewood to cook and stay warm, and transportation shut down. They also questioned India’s claim that the protesting ethnic groups inside Nepal were obstructing supplies. How, they ask, has the fuel supply resumed but internal protests continued? Furthermore, a new government came to power in Nepal that seems less amenable to their dissenting views. So, was it all about India after all?

    Prime Minister Narendra Modi, who is believed to understand the concept of a shared South Asian “commons”, is seen as having missed a unique opportunity to unify the people of the region. The introduction of a new Constitution in Nepal presented a chance to alter the entrenched belief that the outcomes of India’s special relationship with Nepal will always be unfair. Instead, weeks of suffering from the ‘blockade’ have led the Nepalese to drown in suspicion: may be India didn’t like the new Constitution; it knew northern trade points were still damaged by the quake; it callously imposed a weeks-long blockade on their crippled country; the international community silently stayed on India’s good side; and once Nepal’s government agreed to change the Constitution, the blockade appeared to ease. Unfortunately for India, most Nepalis blame Prime Minister Modi, the public face of the Indian government in Nepal.

    An uneven interdependence

    The relationship between India and Nepal is complex, but should it be damaged thus? India increasingly needs Nepal to safeguard its vital interests. But Nepal depends on India far more. Nearly all of its fuel imports come from the Indian Oil Corporation. The Nepalese Rupee continues to be pegged to the Indian Rupee. India is Nepal’s main trading partner, and the border is open. Nepalis have served in the Indian Army, and receive pensions in retirement. By some estimates, one seventh of the entire population of Nepal resides and works in India.

    Despite this uneven interdependence, Indian diplomats have sought to cultivate the delicate impression that they are not viceroys. Even before the recent events, they strained to convey that India cared about the well-being of the people of Nepal, regardless of political uncertainties. They reiterate that they attach the greatest importance to the relationship between India and Nepal.

    The people of Nepal are confused by the mixed messages. After eight years and two elections, they finally wrote a Constitution that they feel India coldly acknowledged. India then reacted indifferently, in their view, to the impending humanitarian crisis. Furthermore, they saw Prime Minister Modi’s invitation to the new Prime Minister of Nepal to visit New Delhi as a ‘summons’. So they ask, does India care about the people of Nepal or is it concerned only about its interests? Is it ready to subject an entire population of more than 27 million to eat bitterness, right when it hurts most, to get what it wants? How retributive is India going to be when the ups and downs of neighbouring democratic processes lead to outcomes it may not like?

    Change perceptions

    There is a critical need for India to shape perceptions in Nepal and erase misunderstanding. It must reaffirm the unity of the people of Nepal while recognising their diversity. Next, it should act visibly to provide relief to those facing scarcity just as the holiday season begins. This current crisis has political origins. But India should respond as it did after the earthquake. It was the compassionate first responder, decisive and focused on alleviating the palpable suffering of the population of a neighbouring country.

    Nobody denies India’s immense power in Nepal. With power comes responsibility. As long as the people of Nepal perceive the outcomes of the special relationship to be unfair, it will be difficult to secure their cooperation. It is up to Prime Minister Modi to change that. South Asia and the world are watching.

    Comment2_2587387a.jpg
    (Nirupama Rao, a former Foreign Secretary of India and former Ambassador to China and the U.S., is currently at the Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs, Brown University, U.S. Atul Pokharel is a postdoctoral fellow from Nepal at the Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs. )
     
  9. TianyaTaiwan

    TianyaTaiwan FULL MEMBER

    New Recruit

    Messages:
    66
    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2015
    Ratings:
    +0 / 199 / -0
    Country:
    China
    Location:
    China
    Shame. The superpower treated a country that has just suffered an earthquake.
    I hope China can help Nepal through difficult times
     
  10. ahojunk

    ahojunk INT'L MOD

    Messages:
    5,147
    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2014
    Ratings:
    +6 / 13,592 / -0
    Country:
    Australia
    Location:
    Australia
    Wow. The Hindu newspaper is brutally frank in its assessment.

    ---------------------
    ‘China has filled vacuum left by India’
    Updated: October 18, 2015 03:58 IST

    INDIA_NEPAL_jpg_2588909f.jpg
    Nepal's Deputy Prime Minister and Foreign Minister Kamal Thapa, centre, arrives at the Indira Gandhi International airport in New Delhi on Saturday.

    Pro-China sentiments can be heard also among the Constitutional fraternity of Nepal.

    After hours of brain-storming in Singha Durbar, Nepal’s new Foreign Minister and Deputy Prime Minister Kamal Thapa left for Delhi and a little later, an electricity outage reminded Nepal of the need to bring an end to the fuel blockade, which is Mr Thapa’s task in Delhi.

    But irrespective of Mr. Thapa’s success or failure in Delhi, Nepali diplomats and politicians say that India-Nepal ties are now damaged. Ramesh Nath Pandey, veteran diplomat and one of the longest serving Ministers in Nepal’s history, told The Hindu that the blockade had created a vacuum in the public mind which has been filled by China. “The blockade hurt Nepal’s supply lines but it also removed the visibility of India inside Nepal. Someone had to fill that vacuum that India left. China is now a psychological force in Nepal because of India’s support to the blockade,” Mr. Pandey said.

    Pro-China sentiments can be heard also among the Constitutional fraternity of Nepal.

    Bipin Adhikari, one of the foremost constitutional lawyers of Nepal, believes that the blockade has ended Nepal’s innocence: “India-Nepal relation is vast and has multiple dimensions. In comparison, Nepal-China ties are small. But after this blockade which has lasted more than two months, Nepal has become aware that it urgently needs an option beyond India. China provides an alternative to India and China has always treated Nepal with respect which is missing in India’s attitude to Kathmandu”.

    Sensing the public mood in Nepal, China moved fast and using massive pieces of machinery, cleared the path that connects Nepal with Tibet at the Tatopani crossing. This helped in reducing the sense of despair in Nepal. China has ensured a steady flow of essential commodities through the newly opened passages but has maintained total silence on India-Nepal ties during this period.

    Mr. Pandey believes that the blockade is rooted in Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s “South Asia First” policy. The blockade has conveyed that new reality of Delhi to countries like Nepal, Bangladesh, Maldives and others in South Asia which did not comprehend the full extent of the political change in India,” said Mr. Pandey.
     
  11. GR!FF!N

    GR!FF!N ELITE MEMBER

    Messages:
    8,706
    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2012
    Ratings:
    +11 / 8,408 / -15
    Country:
    India
    Location:
    India
    @Gibbs

    bro,looks like you guys are RAW spies who ousted Rajapakse.. :lol:

    please explain "Why"??

    In PDF wonderland,everything is possible..I do remember a year ago or so,there was some tension in India-Bhutan relationship due to some Oil subsidy deal got expired and Chinese fanboys claimed Bhutan will enter into China's sphere of influence to "Punish" India..We're still waiting for that day.

    we'll see how "China fills the vacuum in Nepal which is heavily subsidized Gas and Oil supply,Border crossing without visa,traditional(Family) links with India to oust India from Nepal"..

    As I said in another thread,Terrorists,Drunkers and Communists doesn't belong to a country.we've seen these from time to time(even within Indian Communists),but good thing about communists are,they always choose a path of oppression and gets ousted.

    But what is funny is that,this "Oli" didn't utter a single word against India,rather stated "Nepal and India are two different country but one society".. :rofl: Infact,he won with the votes of "Madhesis".

    Chinese fanboys should've backed Prachanda. :lol:

    now the real news,not fantasy...

    Keep off Madhesis, India told - The Hindu

    Nepal PM KP Sharma Oli asks Madhesi, other ethnic protesters to come forward for talks | Latest News & Updates at Daily News & Analysis
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2015
  12. Beast

    Beast ELITE MEMBER

    Messages:
    14,672
    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2011
    Ratings:
    +6 / 35,539 / -30
    Country:
    China
    Location:
    China
    You must thinking Chinese is some poor country? Use a mirror and look into it. You are India. Poorer than Chinese and our National Foreign reserve stood at USD 3.9 trillion. And we have a smart alec told us China can't substitute India subsidies for Nepall? :lol:

    Poor Indian want to compare to rich Chinese? :lol:
     
  13. GR!FF!N

    GR!FF!N ELITE MEMBER

    Messages:
    8,706
    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2012
    Ratings:
    +11 / 8,408 / -15
    Country:
    India
    Location:
    India
    Lol..you'
    you're just justifying your "Username". :rofl:

    I asked "Please explain why" they hate us,not info about China's foreign reserve. :lol:
    And yes,China is not going to supply anything to any country with "Subsidy",they never did in their entire history.
     
  14. Beast

    Beast ELITE MEMBER

    Messages:
    14,672
    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2011
    Ratings:
    +6 / 35,539 / -30
    Country:
    China
    Location:
    China
    Lol... Can't beat my logic and you start personal attack?

    We give subsidize in the name of loan. You must be very upset China replace India in Nepal.

    Indian shall build more toilet for your countrymen before talking about subsidies other countries. :D
     
  15. Donald Trump

    Donald Trump FULL MEMBER

    Messages:
    641
    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2015
    Ratings:
    +0 / 674 / -1
    Country:
    India
    Location:
    India
    When will you stop trolling?