What's new

[Household] Net Worth in U.S. At All-Time High [$98.75 Trillion]

Hamartia Antidote

ELITE MEMBER
Nov 17, 2013
21,167
23
15,714
Country
United States
Location
United States
people with mental problems have the best care in USA
the two catches - can you afford you ? do you want to be treated ? (USA allows people with mental problems to refuse treatment as long as they are not a threat to society)
This 1975 movie started that problem:
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/One_Flew_Over_the_Cuckoo's_Nest_(film)

After this movie Liberals demanded all mental patients be freed from institutions unless it was proven they were a danger to society.
 

Hamartia Antidote

ELITE MEMBER
Nov 17, 2013
21,167
23
15,714
Country
United States
Location
United States
Screen Shot 2018-04-02 at 8.08.17 PM.jpg

https://usa.streetsblog.org/2017/10...ip-rate-higher-now-than-before-the-recession/

America’s Car Ownership Rate Higher Now Than Before the Recession


The share of car-free households in America grew after 2006, but by last year those changes had been wiped out. Graph: Sarah Jo Peterson

Beginning around 2005, Americans’ driving habits seemed to change in fundamental ways. Everyone was driving less, and younger people were putting off drivers licenses and car purchases longer than their parents’ generation did.

Some of these changes appear to have staying power, but while per capita driving remains well below the 2005 peak, it’s been trending upward since 2014. A rebounding economy and cheap gas have changed the equation.

Writing at Medium, urban planner Sarah Jo Peterson looks at how trends in car ownership rates have changed over this period. Census data on the number of cars per household show that after growing for a few years, the share of car-free households in America has dropped below 2006 levels:

The boom did happen. The green and blue lines on the above chart for the United States show the dramatic growth in car-free living and families with only one car since 2006, but their numbers peaked in 2012–2013. By 2016, the total growth in car-free households (the green dot) and car-one families (the blue triangle) had sunk below household growth overall (the black square).

The U.S. Census Bureau doesn’t provide many pre-packaged tables of its vehicle availability data, but it does look at car-free households by age of the householder and by home ownership versus renting. Between 2015 and 2016, the only category with an increase in car-free living above the margin of error is householders age 65 or older who rent. Around 55,000 households led by young adults (ages 15 to 34) abandoned car-free living, about twice the margin of error.

Disentangling the effects of the economy, public policy, and individual preferences on driving and car ownership is a difficult task. But the recent increase in car ownership suggests that as joblessness declines, more people feel that they need a car. This is in line with research from UCLA that attributed much of the decline in driving among young people circa 2009 to rising youth unemployment.

It’s worth noting that in two states Peterson examined — New York and Washington — there are still more car-free households now than in 2006. It’s probably not a coincidence that New York City has the most well-developed transit system in the nation, and Seattle has managed to make significant improvements to its bus and rail systems in recent years.

There’s nothing predetermined about changes in travel behavior. It will take a much stronger public policy commitment to transit, biking, and walking before many Americans feel comfortable opting out of car ownership.
 
Last edited:

Mista

SENIOR MEMBER
Jun 9, 2016
3,236
7
2,828
Country
Singapore
Location
Singapore
It will take a much stronger public policy commitment to transit, biking, and walking before many Americans feel comfortable opting out of car ownership.
Are you for or against higher car usage in the US? IMO it's very difficult to change the car culture in the US because it's sparsely populated. Public transport aren't cost effective to build and cars are still the most convenient by far.
 

Hamartia Antidote

ELITE MEMBER
Nov 17, 2013
21,167
23
15,714
Country
United States
Location
United States
Are you for or against higher car usage in the US? IMO it's very difficult to change the car culture in the US because it's sparsely populated. Public transport aren't cost effective to build and cars are still the most convenient by far.
Currently car ownership (in the US) can be a barometer of wealth. When things get bad the number of cars per family goes down. When things are good it goes up.

In the future with driverless cars this will probably change so dramatically that it can’t be used like this. I would assume private ownership would go down.

Also the rise of telecommuting from home with something like an Amazon workspace is becoming more and more popular. So more and more time will be spent at home and less time commuting. So car usage and public transport will take even more of a hit.



When there are bad snowstorms everybody in my company works from home with work phones routed to our home ones. You begin to wonder about all the expense of office space and all that goes with it.
 
Last edited:

ARMalik

SENIOR MEMBER
Dec 7, 2017
3,187
4
6,079
Country
Australia
Location
Australia
Absolute BS. So called US Reserve Bank Printing dollars out of its arse doesn't mean US is rich. US and its money are worthless piece of thrash being militarily imposed on the World.
 

Hamartia Antidote

ELITE MEMBER
Nov 17, 2013
21,167
23
15,714
Country
United States
Location
United States
Absolute BS. So called US Reserve Bank Printing dollars out of its arse doesn't mean US is rich. US and its money are worthless piece of thrash being militarily imposed on the World.
There are only a few hard currencies in the world. The rest are printed at will by governments and are basically worthless outside their home countries. So the vast majority of the world is doing exactly what you are saying. If you think they have gold or something backing it up then you should think again.

That’s why there’s things like the PetroDollar. They don’t want a truck full of non liquid useless currency from 50 countries. The dollar is just a little more useful out of all the world’s 100% useless ones.
 
Last edited:

Mista

SENIOR MEMBER
Jun 9, 2016
3,236
7
2,828
Country
Singapore
Location
Singapore
Currently car ownership can be a barometer of wealth.
In the US where cars are the main mode of traveling, yes it is.

In Japan on the other hand, Tokyo and Osaka has the lowest car ownership rate despite being the wealthiest cities in the nation. That's because the public transport is extensive there.
 

Hamartia Antidote

ELITE MEMBER
Nov 17, 2013
21,167
23
15,714
Country
United States
Location
United States
In the US where cars are the main mode of traveling, yes it is.

In Japan on the other hand, Tokyo and Osaka has the lowest car ownership rate despite being the wealthiest cities in the nation. That's because the public transport is extensive there.
I fixed it. Although Japan is still very high for car ownership at around 600 per 1000 people. The US is 800.
 

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Total: 1, Members: 0, Guests: 1)

Top