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History of Punjabis

Brass Knuckles

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History covers all aspect of society whether they are economical, cultural or religious. Secondly, his followers are Pakistani Punjabis living inside Pakistan. His evil ideology has affected Punjabis.
He was from qadian India discuss him in Indian history thread
@Dubious isn't religious discussion against forum rules see post#127
 

Mutakalim

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He was from qadian India discuss him in Indian history thread
@Dubious isn't religious discussion against forum rules see post#127
He was a Punjabi and his followers are Punjabi. He has directly affected Punjabi history, even a martial law was imposed to contain riots in Lahore. I think your pseudo liberal brain is incapable of understanding simple historical facts.
 

Taimur Khurram

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Raja Mal Khan



Raja Mal Khan was a Punjabi warlord who had converted to Islam during the reign of the Ghurid Empire, due to his profound appreciation for Sufi teachings and poetry. He then engaged in a campaign of warfare, managing to gain control over the Salt Range and parts of surrounding areas (which Muhammad Ghauri had allowed him to keep because of his religion). After the death of Muhammad Ghauri, his military endeavours intensified, resulting in him conquering Lahore and even going as far south as Multan. Interestingly enough, Raja Mal Khan's family claimed to be related to Porus, as does the Janjua tribe (which he belonged to) today.

https://www.dawn.com/news/1101057

Ali Khan



Ali Khan was a 9th century warlord in the Punjab, and is most notable for being the first known Gujar to rule over the Punjab, as well as the first known individual to be clearly identified with the tribe. At one point, his domains included much of northern and western Punjab along with parts of Kashmir, and even the Karkota Empire to the north grew somewhat wary of his expansions. He is also credited with developing Gujrat to such an extent that many in the area consider him to be its true founder.

https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=1QmrSwFYe60C&pg=PA306&dq=Ali+Khan+Gujar&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwir8ZiA5ZbkAhWyoXEKHUFpDsMQ6AEIKzAA#v=onepage&q=Ali Khan Gujar&f=false

https://books.google.co.uk/books?id...ved=0ahUKEwjLgNyV5ZbkAhWGSxUIHaS6ACwQ6AEIPjAD
 

Pax Pakistanica

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We've got one for Pashtuns, so I am making one for Punjabis.

I will start off with some historical Punjabi figures:

Porus

View attachment 475320

A Punjabi king who fought bravely against Alexander of Macedon. Defeating him was one of Alexander's most difficult conquests, and out of respect for Porus he employed him as a satrapy over the area. The difficulty of the battle also seems to have caused the Macedonian soldiersoldier's reluctancy to fight any further, to the point where they almost started a mutiny. This resulted in Alexander being forced to end his campaign of expansion.

https://www.britannica.com/biography/Porus

Kautilya

A famous philosopher from Taxila who tutored Chandragupta Maurya, and held a key position in the Mauryan Empire. He is often compared to Aristotle and Plato.

https://www.britannica.com/biography/Kautilya

Sarang Khan

He was a powerful ruler of Nothern Punjab who fought alongside Babur during his conquests of Hindustan. He obtained the title of Sultan for his efforts. When Sher Shah Suri usurped Babur's son Humayun, Sarang fought against him bravely, and Sher Shah Suri was never able to subdue his people even after skinning Sarang himself.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sultan_Sarang_Khan

Wazir Khan

View attachment 475328

A Punjabi who acted as Shah Jahan's physician. He was also a Mughal noble and chief Qazi of Lahore for quite some time during Mughal rule. He founded Wazirabad and Wazir Khan Masjid is named after him.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wazir_Khan_(Lahore)

Shahbaz Khan

A Punjabi who fought as a general under Akbar. He participated in some of the most difficult battles during Akbar's reign, and annexed large amounts of Hindustan. He was also a highly religious Muslim, keeping a long beard and regularly praying.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shahbaz_Khan_Kamboh

Abdullah Bhatti

He rebelled against Mughal emeperor Akbar, and is often compared to Robin Hood due to his social banditry. Many folklore tales speak highly of his deeds. When he was hung, his last words that were uttered were "No honourable son of Punjab will ever sell the soil of Punjab".

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dulla_Bhatti

Fateh Muhammad

Worked as a commander in Aurangzeb's army. He was also the father of Hyder Ali, who was the father of Tipu Sultan.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fath_Muhammad

Mukarrab Khan

View attachment 475326

A powerful chieftain of nothern Punjab who fought alongside Nader Shah during his conquests of the Mughal Empire. He was awarded the title of Nawab for his efforts and was allowed to retain control of his kingdom. He then expanded it to include much of nothern Pakistan before being defeated by the Sikh Empire. Even then, his people continued to rebel against the Sikhs.

http://firdosh101.blogspot.co.uk/2009/05/history-of-gakhars.html?m=1

Allama Iqbal

View attachment 475321

An Urdu/Farsi poet as well as a philosopher who is also considered the spiritual father of Pakistan.

http://historypak.com/allama-muhammad-iqbal-1877-1938/

Rehmat Ali

View attachment 475322

One of Pakistan's founding fathers. He came up with the name of Pakistan and was the author of the Pakistan declaration.

http://historypak.com/choudhry-rahmat-ali-1895-1951/

Faiz Ahmed Faiz

View attachment 475323

One of Urdu's most celebrated poets. He won numerous awards for his poetry, such as the Lenin Peace Prize and Nishan-e-Imtiaz. He was also nominated for a Nobel Prize in Literature.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faiz_Ahmad_Faiz

Shabbir Sharif

View attachment 475325

The most decorated soldier to ever serve the Pakistani army. During 1971, he and his men destroyed several Hindustani tanks and kept two Hindustani battalions at bay by killing over 40 of their troops and capturing almost 30 of them as POW's. He also defeated a Hindustani company commander who challenged him to hand-to-hand combat. He won both Nishan-e-Haider and Sitara-e-Jurat for his efforts.

http://www.pakarmymuseum.com/exhibits/second-lieutenant-shabbir-sharif/

Tikka Khan

View attachment 475324

Fought against Erwin Rommel in WW2 as part of Britain's Africa campaign. He also served in the Pakistani army, participating in the Battle of Chawinda (2nd largest tank battle in history) and lead the army to great victories in the Rann of Kutch. He eventually became a general, and crushed Bengali and Baluchi insurgencies with a heavy hand. He's also my PDF profile picture.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tikka_Khan

No, because Porus and Kautilya were not Muslim.
"History of the pre-Islamic Punjabis and Punjabi Muslims" would've been a more appropriate title for the thread.
 

W.11

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amusingly i read some where in lahore's history that greeks mentioned khatris in their records, how true is it and how is khatri relation is unknown.

the vedic record of sapta sindhu indicates punjab and adjoining lands.

sindhis have better recorded history in entire pakistan, call it irony or what that arabs invaded sindh and recorded its history so it got recorded pretty early.

regards
 

Great Janjua

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So what's your point you idiot
amusingly i read some where in lahore's history that greeks mentioned khatris in their records, how true is it and how is khatri relation is unknown.

the vedic record of sapta sindhu indicates punjab and adjoining lands.

sindhis have better recorded history in entire pakistan, call it irony or what that arabs invaded sindh and recorded its history so it got recorded pretty early.

regards
 

Intsar Ahmad

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I will also do the history of some of the tribes in the Punjab.

Gujjars

The Gujjars are a nomadic tribe that exist primarily in Pakistan, but also have significant numbers in Afghanistan and Hindustan.

They are believed to be the descendants of Central Asians who migrated to the region during the invasions of the Huna people (they were most likely an allied tribe in their confederation, such as the Khazars) and intermarried with local Indo-Aryans, hence why they speak an Indo-Aryan language (Gojri). This is strengthened by the fact that some of the earliest references to Gujjars in the region appear shortly after the Huna invasions.

The Gujjar language (Gojrj) is also interesting since roughly 10-13% of its words (depending on the dialect) actually come from Pashto, suggesting that the original abode of the Gujjars (after they came from Central Asia and intermarried with the locals) would be eastern Afghanistan/KPK/FATA where the Pashto language would have influenced them (perhaps they may have even occasionally intermarried), since large numbers of Gujjars are found there and it seems strange that Gojri dialects in places like Gilgit Baltistan and Azad Kashmir (where there are next to no Pashtuns) have such a large number of words borrowed from Pashto. There's also the fact that many of the Gujjars of eastern Afghanistan, KPK and FATA consider themselves to be some of the earliest inhabitants of the region, and the fact that the traditional migration route for Central Asians to Pakistan was via the Khyber Pass (in fact, the Hunas used this specific pass to enter Pakistan).

The Gujjars established many dynasties across Pakistan and Hindustan, such as the Shah Mir dynasty, Tomara dynasty, and Chavda dynasty. Many places such as Gujjar Khan, Gujrat and Gujranwala are also named after them. The Gujjars also fought in large numbers in Muhammad Bin Qasim's army, and have a played a significant role in Pakistan's armed forces, with Tufail Muhammad (Nishan-e-Haider winner) being a Gujjar and large portions of the Pakistani military being Gujjars. Gujjars in Afghanistan also fought hard against the USSR as part of the Afghan Mujahadeen.

There have also been plenty of famous Gujjars, such as Shoaib Akhtar (fastest bowler in history) and Rehmat Ali (author of the Pakistan declaration).

https://gujjarnation.blogspot.co.uk/2014/12/list-of-famous-gujjar-and-bureaucrats.html

https://www.sil.org/system/files/re...6620875850976172253716042392/32846_SSNP03.pdf

https://jktribals.page.tl/History-of-Gujjars.htm
Writing a book review is not just about summarizing; it's also an opportunity to present a critical discussion of the book that what is on the pages, how analyzed how the book tried to achieve its purpose. Keeping in mind these principles I dare to review the book of a retired Police Officer Mr. Gh. Sarwar Chauhan, belonging to Gujjar community, who happened to be my senior in the days of my active service. If we had a way to go back alive in time, we could have never got past account of our history in books; we would have never been able to pay tribute to our ancestry. We are not makers of history, we are made by history and it is an issue of human progression. When we chatter about 'Gujjar' history, we find that Gurjar or Gujjar are a group with populations in India, Pakistan and a small number in northeastern Afghanistan. When the image of Gujjar community haunts our mind about its less known facts, number of books, scripts and editorials on the subject comes to our rescue. Many such sources encountered me as an analytical mind and ultimately my inquisitiveness came to dead end when a comprehensive research work of G. Sarwar Chauhan (ex-SSP), as a complete book on origin, rise and growth of Gujjars touched down my library. Despite the fact, it is a compilation work based on historical facts with relevant references, but the texture of Hindi idiom 'Gagar mein Sagar' meaning 'Ocean in a pot' is the closing word that can be coined for the book. The writer has appealingly adventured the journey of Gujjar community by narration of its stops and advances through archival actuality traversing over sons of Noah, Manusmriti, king porus, Kushan Empire, Gurjara Pratihara dynasty, Gujjars in Mughal Era, gujjars in Muslim Era, Gujjars during British rule, Gujjars in freedom struggle of India and many more historical aspects. One senses crux of contentment and proud of this Gujjar community while moving on their chariot. In a very conceivable way the compiler at the beginning has relied upon the view of the history presented by Genesis 10 of the Hebrew Bible, about Noah and his family as only survivors to continue the human race after total destruction of population on earth by the flood. In line, 'Ham', 'Shem', and 'Japheth' were three sons of Noah. The author relying on calling of each other sometimes in the community may be as a satire "Yapheth Ki Aulad" has surmised Gujjars ancestry as from 'Japheth', and further based on the traditional claim of Armenian and Georgian as descendant from 'Togarmah', next generation falling in line with 'Japheth', affiliate Gujjars to Georgians also. In a very plausible way the hobbyist has referred 'Manu Smriti', for entitling progenitor of mankind as 'Manu' to be the first king to rule this earth who saved mankind from universal flood. The writer very honestly have gone in favor of population of human as descendant from same subject having two versions of it, as 'Noah' and 'Manu' versions and believe Gujjars are also one of them and reflects in his opinion as one theory of origin of Gujjars. Advancing pages of the text enrich our knowledge that after Mahabharata the Krishna after abandoning Mathura, united Kshatriya clan and his surviving Kshatriyas from his army into one and named them as 'Gurjar' and their government come to be known as 'Gujratar' with capital established in Dwarika. In first century AD, Gurjars have established reigns of two dynasties. The Nagar dynasty of Gurjars ruled Bengal, Bihar, Orissa (now Odisha), Uttar Pradesh and central India. The other dynasty as Kushan Gurjars ruled Peshawar and Agghanistan and Kanishka as their emperor. His reign spread up to Central Asia, as a result of which Gurjars could be seen dwelling in Afghanistan, Russia, and Iran even these days. Kushan Empire collapsed in 375 AD. Gurjar ruled as feudatories to Guptas till 455 AD when it collapsed due to Huan attack. The name 'Gurjardesa' was founded by Yashodharman in 480 AD (earlier it was Gujarat) after defeating Huna king. Many of the writings available on search engines but all had confused the origin of this community rather than to come on one platform. The chapter 8 of the book educates us about 'Who are Gujjars'. The claims of historians (almost 90%) that Gujjars originated in Central Asia and ultimately settled in Gujrat stand contested in the book. The author has placed its reliance that the Gurjars were established in the area near Mount Abu in Rajsthan around 6th century. The Gurjars were Hindus at the time they were first noticed in India. They have established a kingdom of their own at the time of Harsha of Thaneswar (607-647) about 640 AD. About 759 AD, the Chapa dynasty of Gurjars which had been in power for 200 years was displaced by Pratihars who carried till 1000 AD, when their power was broken by the coming of Mahmud of Ghazni who later migrated to mountains for pasture for the animals. The book civilizes us that Gurjar was most powerful Khsatriyan group of his time. The people liked them so much that their kingdoms were called Gurjaratra, Gurjar Bhumi, Gurjar Mandal, Gurjar Rashtra, Gurjar Desh, Gurjar Bhubhuj and their rulers were called Gurjarendra, Gurjareshwar, and Gurjranath by them. It also guide us that Rajput Sangh was formed to fight out the Muslims invaders somewhere during 13th century in Marwar region by famous Gurjar clans i.e. Pratihars, Parmars, Chalukyas, Chauhans, Gehlots, Chandels, Tomars, Chawdas, Dhamas, etc. The writer has efficiently show-cased the places named after Gujjars spread over to Punjab, Gujarat, Himachal Pradesh, Haryana, J&K and also in Pakistan and Afghanistan. Likewise reference of Gujjar personalities from across J&K, Punjab, Himachal Pradesh, Haryana, Delhi, UP, Uttarakhand, Rajsthan, Nadhya Pradesh, Maharashtra and also from Pakistan excelling from all walks of society in chapter 33 is marvelous data compilation. Gujjars belong to Aryans and writer too have relied upon the work of Mr Baij Nath Puri (The history of Gujjars and Pratharas), K M Munshi (The Glory that was Gujjar Desh), Rana Ali Hassan Chouhan (The history of Gujjars), Mr Jatinder Kumar Verma (Gujjar Ithas).
J&K has conspicuous geographical concentration all over the state, except Ladakh. In the Kashmir division the concentration of Gujjars is on the mountain slopes and valleys side in the area of Kukernag, Kangan, Tral, Doru, Pahalgam, Shopian, Kulgam, Handwara, Karnah, Kupwara and Uri Tehsils whereas in Jammu division Gujjars dominate in the border tehsils along the LoC i.e. Haveli, Mendhar, Nowshera, and Bani with their pockets in Bhaderwah, Doda, Gool, Kishtwar, Kathua, Udhampur and Arnas. The language spoken by Gujjars and Bakerwals of J&K termed as 'Gujari' is a form of 'Marwari' and had its root in Sanskrit. Gujari speakers constitute the single largest group of its persons in the state after Kashmiri and Dogri speakers. A majority of Gujjars follow Hinduism and Islam, though small Gujjar communities following other religions Gujjars.
The most informative part of the book based on study by 'Tribal and Cultural Foundation J&K' is about the socio-economic condition of Gujjars in J&K and various reforms required in the field have been detailed. Similarly socio-economic condition of Gujjars Women in J&K describing woes and misery of Gujjar women still living primitive life projected in real perceptions as a matter of concern for the community. The encyclopedia of approximately 479 Gujjar clans finding reference in the memoir is marvelous.
Concluding when it comes to the possibilities of learning from history there are doubtless many things we could aspire to learn from this book. Some of those would be more practically useful, in terms of contributing to the normal and decent functioning of well-meaning societies than others.
 

ghazi52

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Sikh Period

1762-1849 A.D.

The Sikhs established their Empire in the Punjab after the death of the Mughal Emperor Aurangzeb Alamgir in 1707. With the death of Aurangzeb the country saw a series of rapid governmental changes that stressed it in to the depths of anarchy. Taking advantage of this certain Charat Singh, who was the head of one of the Sikh Clans, established his stronghold in Gujranwala in 1763. Charat Singh died in 1774 and was succeeded by his son, Mahan Singh, who in turn fathered the most brilliant leader in the history of the Punjab: Maharaja Ranjit Singh. It was this remarkable leader who united the whole Punjab under one flag. His rule stretched from the banks of the Jamuna to the Khyber and from Kashmir to Multan. Maharaja Ranjit Singh was the most powerful of all the Sikh Rulers and ruled over for complete 40 years. After his death in 1840 the Sikh Empire was divided into small principalities looked after by several Sikh Jagirdars. This weak situation provided a good opportunity to the British of East India Company to put an end to the Sikh strong hold in the Punjab in 1849.


Sikhs are the followers of Baba Guru Nanak Sahib. He was the son of Mehta Kalu Chand and Tripta Devi, both of them Khatris by caste. He was born at Nankana Sahib in 1464. Sikhism was born as a direct reaction against rigid, cruel and inhuman practices of Brahamanism and its rigid caste system. But another important factor which influenced the mind of the people who contributed to the growth of Sikhism, was the impact of Islam which had spread from Arabia to Iraq, Turkistan, Persia and Afghanistan and came in to contact with Christianity, Judaism, Buddhism and Zoroastrianism.


The Sikh religion is in fact a product of the Sufi and Bhakti school of thought. Guru Nanak was greatly influenced by Kabir and Shaikh Ibrahim Farid (1450 - 1535) a descendent of the famous Sufi saint Shaikh Fariduddin Shakarganj of Pak Pattan whose works were incorporated in the Garanth Sahib. Guru Nanak studied books of Hindu and Muslims religions and it was only after deep study of both the religions that he evolved his own school of thought. The basic principles of the Sikhism are much closer to Islam than to Hinduism. A study of the life, events of the Gurus and the large numbers of the monuments sacred to them will, however, reveal how deeply all the Sikh Gurus in general and Guru Nanak, Ajen Dev and Har Gobind Singh in particular are associated with Pakistan.



Emperor Ranjit Singh











Haveli, Rangit Singh Gujranwala






Birth Stone of Rangit Singh


Important Sikh Gurus, Dates

1. Guru Nanak Sahib.. (1464-1539 A.D).
2. Guru Angad (1504-1522 A.D)
3. Guru Amar Das (1509-1574 A.D)
4. Guru Ram Das (1534-1581 A.D)
5. Guru Arjun Dev (1563-1606 A.D)
6. Guru Har Gobind (1595-1645 A.D)
7. Guru Har Rai (1631-1661 A.D)
8. Guru Har Krishan (1656-1664 A.D)
9. Guru Tegh Bahadur (1622-1675 A.D)
10. Guru Gobind Singh (1665-1708 A.D)




Smadhi Ranjit Singh



Sikh Shrines
:
The Gurdwaras are more than a place of worship. They serve as Schools, meeting place and a rest house for the travelers in addition to enshrining the Garanth Sahib. The Gurdwaras are, as such, integral part of the Sikh religious and social life. Since the Sikh Rule lasted for almost a century in the sub-continent there are hundreds of Gurdawaras all over Pakistan but mostly in the Punjab, some of which are very famous such as Nankana Sahib and Punja Sahib. These Gurdwaras are looked after by the Evacuee Trust Property Board (ETPB) which is under the control of the Ministry of Culture, Islamabad.

The legacy of our predecessors at the time of our independence, on August 14, 1947, came to us as a treasure which may be called as Pakistan’s national heritage. So rich and diversified is this heritage that Pakistani nation can be proud of its glorious past, be Islamic, Post Islamic or pre-Islamic period as far back as pre-historic times. No other country of the world can produce the treasure of by gone days as can be found in Pakistan. It is now incumbent upon us to treasure our national heritage and save it from further deterioration and loss.





Punja Sahib, Hasanabdal
 

Adam Elvin

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Maharaja Shalinder

After the fall of Kushan Empire country was divided in to small states. There is no information of any important state in a period of two centuries following Kushan rule. In the beginning of fifth century we find Jat ruler Maharaja Shalinder with his rule extending from Punjab to Malwa and Rajasthan. This is proved from the Pali inscription obtained from village Kanswa in Kota state in year 1820 AD. We get following information from this inscription: [Thakur Deshraj, Jat Itihas, p.208-211]

Shalinder was the ruler Shalpur, known in the present by the name Sialkot. He established this state on his own power, which indicates that he was a monarch emerged from chieftain ship of a republic state. He had a powerful army full of strong warriors amongst whom he felt proud of glory of his caste. He had many small states under him and a rich treasury. He was a Kashyapvanshi (Suryavanshi) Taxak clan Jat. He had left Buddhism and adopted puranic religion and started vedic culture like performing yagyas etc. [Thakur Deshraj, Jat Itihas, p.208-211]

He married with a lady of other caste as he has been mentioned as having a "dogla" issue from him. His descendant Degali had married with daughters of Yaduvanshi. One of these queens gave birth to Veer Narendra. The chronology derived from this inscription is as under: 1. Maharaja Shalinder, 2. Dogla, 3. Sambuk, 4. Degali, 5. Veer Narendra 6. Veerchandra 7. Shalichandra

In samvat 597 (540 AD) a temple was built on the bank of river Taveli in Kota state and a close relative of Jit Shalinder had written the inscription. Probably the writer of the inscription was Shalichandra (son of Veerchandra and grandson of Veer Narendra), who left Shalivahanpur in samvat 597 (540 AD) due to attack of Huns and came to Malwa. Maharaja Shalinder had probably sought the help of his own clan ruler Maharaja Yasodharman of Malwa. In the first attempt of combined Jat power, they defeated Huns and repulsed them from Punjab which is clear from the Chandra’s grammar ‘Ajaya jarto Hunan’.
 

W.11

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He was a Kashyapvanshi (Suryavanshi) Taxak clan Jat. He had left Buddhism and adopted puranic religion and started vedic culture like performing yagyas etc. [Thakur Deshraj, Jat Itihas, p.208-211]
must be a greek or roman, or a bactrian religion, or perhaps the religion of the middle east with chief deity innana :cheesy:

regards
 

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