• Friday, September 21, 2018

Highways in Taklimakan Desert in China's Xinjiang

Discussion in 'China & Far East' started by Adam WANG SHANGHAI MEGA, Jun 14, 2018.

  1. Adam WANG SHANGHAI MEGA

    Adam WANG SHANGHAI MEGA SENIOR MEMBER

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    Highways in Taklimakan Desert in China's Xinjiang
    Source: Xinhua| 2018-06-14 07:39:40|Editor: ZD



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    Cars run on the first highway in Taklimakan Desert in northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, June 12, 2018. The first highway across the Taklimakan, running 522 kilometers from Lunnan in the north, to Minfeng county in the south, was opened to traffic in 1995. The second north-south road across the desert opened to traffic about a decade ago, cutting the distance between the two important regional cities of Hotan and Aral by 550 km and the travel time by about seven hours. (Xinhua/Zhao Ge)






    [​IMG]


    Cars run on the first highway in Taklimakan Desert in northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, June 12, 2018. The first highway across the Taklimakan, running 522 kilometers from Lunnan in the north, to Minfeng county in the south, was opened to traffic in 1995. The second north-south road across the desert opened to traffic about a decade ago, cutting the distance between the two important regional cities of Hotan and Aral by 550 km and the travel time by about seven hours. (Xinhua/Zhao Ge)
    [​IMG]
    A car runs on the first highway in Taklimakan Desert in northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, June 12, 2018.The first highway across the Taklimakan, running 522 kilometers from Lunnan in the north, to Minfeng county in the south, was opened to traffic in 1995. The second north-south road across the desert opened to traffic about a decade ago, cutting the distance between the two important regional cities of Hotan and Aral by 550 km and the travel time by about seven hours. (Xinhua/Zhao Ge)



    [​IMG]


    Cars run on the second highway across Taklimakan Desert in northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, Nov. 27, 2017. The first highway across the Taklimakan, running 522 kilometers from Lunnan in the north, to Minfeng county in the south, was opened to traffic in 1995. The second north-south road across the desert opened to traffic about a decade ago, cutting the distance between the two important regional cities of Hotan and Aral by 550 km and the travel time by about seven hours. (Xinhua/Zhao Ge)



    [​IMG]


    Cars run on the first highway in Taklimakan Desert in northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, June 12, 2018. The first highway across the Taklimakan, running 522 kilometers from Lunnan in the north, to Minfeng county in the south, was opened to traffic in 1995. The second north-south road across the desert opened to traffic about a decade ago, cutting the distance between the two important regional cities of Hotan and Aral by 550 km and the travel time by about seven hours. (Xinhua/Zhao Ge)



    [​IMG]


    A truck runs on the second highway across Taklimakan Desert in northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, Nov. 27, 2017. The first highway across the Taklimakan, running 522 kilometers from Lunnan in the north, to Minfeng county in the south, was opened to traffic in 1995. The second north-south road across the desert opened to traffic about a decade ago, cutting the distance between the two important regional cities of Hotan and Aral by 550 km and the travel time by about seven hours. (Xinhua/Zhao Ge)



    [​IMG]


    A car runs on the second highway across Taklimakan Desert in northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, Nov. 27, 2017. The first highway across the Taklimakan, running 522 kilometers from Lunnan in the north, to Minfeng county in the south, was opened to traffic in 1995. The second north-south road across the desert opened to traffic about a decade ago, cutting the distance between the two important regional cities of Hotan and Aral by 550 km and the travel time by about seven hours. (Xinhua/Zhao Ge)
     
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  2. Kiss_of_the_Dragon

    Kiss_of_the_Dragon ELITE MEMBER

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    This highway is just a big engineering joke of 21st century, how much we have to pay to maintain and to prevent sand from cover up this highway? any sand storm will make this as high way of doom, we pay an heavy price to artificially keep this highway alive, We should bring water from Tibet to reforest and recover this land.

     
  3. Adam WANG SHANGHAI MEGA

    Adam WANG SHANGHAI MEGA SENIOR MEMBER

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    Just maintain the plants along the line and that is enough!

    You worry too much,There are Tazhong Oilfields in the central part of the Taklamakan Desert. In any case, this road must be constructed and properly maintained.
    The actual operating costs are not high at all.
     
  4. Kiss_of_the_Dragon

    Kiss_of_the_Dragon ELITE MEMBER

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    Why would I be worry since I'm not the one paying for this highway :lol:, I merely express my opinion, see on the pictures how may cars or trucks run one the high way .
     
  5. Adam WANG SHANGHAI MEGA

    Adam WANG SHANGHAI MEGA SENIOR MEMBER

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    According to your statement, China should abandon Xinjiang and Tibet, especially Tibet, where there is only 3.3 million people. This is a big place wasting Chinese military spending.

    Your point of view has its own problems. In some places, the roads are very busy. In some places, there are fewer vehicles on the road . Because there are few vehicles, will a road not be put into service?

    In some mountainous regions, if 100% of electrification is to be achieved, sometimes it is necessary to lose money to build infrastructure. Does the State Grid of China no need to increase grid coverage to avoid losing money?
     
  6. GeraltofRivia

    GeraltofRivia FULL MEMBER

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    My friend, this type of project cannot be judged solely for an economical point of view, particularly not on a standard alone basis.it has its strategic merit which is far beyond the economy. You are quite right there are other more appealing projects but they are complimenting not competing in nature.
     
  7. Kiss_of_the_Dragon

    Kiss_of_the_Dragon ELITE MEMBER

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    Don't put word in my mouth, point me any logical evident that I suggest to abandon Xinjiang and Tibet, the kind of people like you that like to make false accusation is troublesome for China and Chinese people, if people don't go by your ideology or mindset then they're anti-China...LMAO. I merely suggest that we could have bring water to Xinjiang for reforestation than let the nature to take over the desert then we don't have to waste so much money to maintain this 522 km highway.
     
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  8. Mohrenn

    Mohrenn FULL MEMBER

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    How much more money and efforts would it cost to take water all the way from Tibet through the mountains to Xinjiang, compared to just maintaining a road, which I guess can be done by simple automatic cleaning trucks going up and down the road at regular intervals ? Even if a hundred trucks per day were needed to clean the road, which I don't think is the case at all, it would still remain much much cheaper than a canal bringing water from Tibet and then distributing that water on both sides of the road for hundreds of miles. If a truck costs 1000 dollars per day to do that, that would be 3.6 billion dollars to have those 100 trucks clean the road et the same time continually every single day for an entire century. That's nothing compared to the crazy amount it would cost to divert water from Tibet to Xinjiang.
     
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2018
  9. Adam WANG SHANGHAI MEGA

    Adam WANG SHANGHAI MEGA SENIOR MEMBER

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    Do you know how much money would be spent on the so called Tibet to xinjang river 红旗河??
    No need to consider the salinization problem of the inland river??. Just to say a few words, this 6,000-kilometer river can circulate well??.

    Your suggestions are impractical, while at the same time blindly accusing the road that actually plays a huge role (since you see that there are not many vehicles on the road, you feel that this road is useless??). I think the current Taklamakan Desert Highway is quite Well, it has great practical significance to promote the development of oilfields, desert tourism, blocking of mobile sand dunes, and connecting the north and south regions of Xinjiang as well.