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Has Pakistan's internal threat exceeded the external one?

53fd

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Pakistan faces a myriad of internal & external security threats. While it faces external threats in the form of spillovers from the WOT in Afghanistan into FATA/KPK, drone strikes, cross border terrorism from TTP safe havens in Afghanistan, as well as cross border terrorism from Afghanistan to Balochistan; it also faces numerous internal security threats: sectarian terrorism (against civilians & rival groups), attacks against the establishment (government, army, peace Lashkars), attacks from separatist insurgents in Balochistan etc. While some of the external threats are connected to the internal ones, it would be foolhardy to say that removing the external threats would bring an end to the internal ones.

Although sectarian terrorism does not directly target the state/establishment, it targets the harmony & balance, the very fabric of Pakistani society. It is arguably the most 'dangerous type' of terrorism for the long-term future of Pakistan, because it has its roots from extremism emanating from Pakistani society. Sectarian terrorism in Pakistan in the past has been the consequence of the fierce proxy war fought by Saudi Arabia & Iran inside Pakistan over the years, but now has been embedded into Pakistani society, making it an internal threat.

The sectarian groups were given a free hand by the LEAs, & especially the courts over the years (so-called "lack of evidence"). Now that the courts have seen what a threat the ASWJ/SSP, AHF, RT they are proving to Pakistani society, they have decided to ban these groups. But Pakistan might have to see some of the repercussions from these groups in light of these bans. Nipping a threat in the bud is always a good idea, rather than letting it prolong & grow into a monster. But it is still better to address an issue late than not addressing it at all. Better late than never.

While it's correct to say that the groups that are currently directly attacking the state/establishment have their roots in the Afghan WOT (external threat), the sectarian outfits have been embedded into Pakistani society as a result of Iran-Saudi Arabia proxy warfare over decades, & have now become an internal threat. The biggest challenge Pakistan is facing right now is the increasing co-operation between sectarian outfits, & the groups that directly attack the establishment/state. The amalgamation of the internal & external threats.

Pakistan must be firm, & decide that it is impartial in the Saudi-Iran proxy warfare on its own land, that it will not tolerate sectarian violence from either Shia or Sunni extremist groups. Pakistani Shias must make an effort to sort out their differences with mainstream Pakistani Sunnis, acclimatize & make themselves count, rather than distancing themselves from society. The mainstream Sunnis should distance themselves from Takfiris.

People on this very forum think the US leaving the region would solve the problems. While removing some of the external threats (spillover from Afghanistan into FATA/KPK, Balochistan) can weaken some of Pakistan's internal threats (attacks against the establishment, Balochistan separatist insurgency etc). But as long as Pakistan is not focusing on its internal threats hard enough, eliminating the external threats will not resolve the security challenges the country faces. While Pakistan still has a good number of peace loving citizens residing in it, the increasing number of extremists in mainstream Pakistani society is a source of concern. While Pakistan does not face an imminent threat to its existence from (increasing) extremism, it definitely is a worrying trend.

Pakistan had a successful deradicalization program during Musharraf's time, which stopped extremists getting 'converted' into terrorists. I would argue that this is the biggest need for Pakistan right now (deradicalizing Pakistani society), as it would go a long way in reducing the security threat inside the country, the biggest threat to Pakistan. Currently, Pakistan faces a bigger threat from the extremists than the militants inside the country. If militants/terrorists are the fuel that drive a machine, extremists are the machine themselves. Fuel eventually runs out with time (as the state of war is not perennial) , but the machine does not. As long as machine is still there, it only needs some 'ignition' to be operational again. Extremism revitalizes militancy. The Pakistan military is pounding the militants hard in their strongholds, but the LEAs & the courts are doing far less to tackle the extremists (potential to-be-militants) in the rest of the country.

While Pakistan has focused on its external threats from the neighborhood, the bigger threat is arguably internal, & to tackle that, one needs to have vision & courage, & most importantly, the good of the country in his/her heart.

While there are increasing challenges, and setbacks for Pakistan today; there are many recent developments that are encouraging. I believe all it takes is a courageous leader, someone with vision & the good for the country in his/her heart to revive the nation. As awareness to these issues is increasing, it might take some time to revitalize the nation, but I am very confident that Pakistan will be successful in this 'fight'.
 

seekers

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i don't believe this shia-sunni war, because sunnis are also target of one mind set which intent to turn or kill . Turn through tablighe and kill through taliban and allies ssp,lj,etc.Everybody knows who is behind them.
 

OrionHunter

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Pakistan’s sectarian violence is partly rooted in the eclipse of an Indo-Persian cultural matrix. This 'Arabist shift' (the tendency to view the present in terms of an imagined Arab past with the Arab as the only “real/pure” Muslim) touched new heights through a convergence of General Zia-ul Haq’s politically motivated Islamization of the Pakistani state and society and the U.S. sponsored jihad in Afghanistan on the one hand, and the fallout of the Iranian revolution and the Kashmir dispute on the other.

In the absence of a comprehensive campaign against terrorism that also addresses its root causes and aims for the hearts and minds of the people, the explosion of a tribal warrior culture masquerading as religious extremism in Pakistan could well mark a quantum leap in the destabilization of the region.
 

Bond

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i don't believe this shia-sunni war, because sunnis are also target of one mind set which intent to turn or kill . Turn through tablighe and kill through taliban and allies ssp,lj,etc.Everybody knows who is behind them.
Let me guess... RAW, CIA & Mosaad? ...
 

Rusty

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Pakistan’s sectarian violence is partly rooted in the eclipse of an Indo-Persian cultural matrix. This 'Arabist shift' (the tendency to view the present in terms of an imagined Arab past with the Arab as the only “real/pure” Muslim) touched new heights through a convergence of General Zia-ul Haq’s politically motivated Islamization of the Pakistani state and society and the U.S. sponsored jihad in Afghanistan on the one hand, and the fallout of the Iranian revolution and the Kashmir dispute on the other.

In the absence of a comprehensive campaign against terrorism that also addresses its root causes and aims for the hearts and minds of the people, the explosion of a tribal warrior culture masquerading as religious extremism in Pakistan could well mark a quantum leap in the destabilization of the region.

and I think you are saying things about a topic you don't have a full understanding about.
We don't view Arabs as better Muslims, in fact often times we see them as worse.
But there is no denying that our identity comes from Islam, and we should keep it pure.
Pakistan has the problem were we are still doing culturally backwards things that we inherited from our pre Islamic past. And there is simply a drive to try and remove that, even you Indians are doing the same, trying to get rid of the cast system and what not.
There is nothing wrong with this and this in no way invalidates you as a people (Indians) so you guys should not really be as concerned with us as you seem to be on this forum.
 

third eye

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While Pakistan has focused on its external threats from the neighborhood, the bigger threat is arguably internal, & to tackle that, one needs to have vision & courage, & most importantly, the good of the country in his/her heart.
Link to post No 1 please.

Above is the operative part of the entire article.
 

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