• Thursday, November 15, 2018

Gwadar's Future as Hong Kong West

Discussion in 'Pakistan Economy' started by RiazHaq, May 2, 2015.

  1. RiazHaq

    RiazHaq SENIOR MEMBER

    Messages:
    5,180
    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2009
    Ratings:
    +58 / 5,411 / -0
    Country:
    Pakistan
    Location:
    United States
    Haq's Musings: Will Pakistan's Gwadar Become "Hong Kong West"?

    The port city of Hong Kong has played a pivotal role in China's economic and trade expansion on the Chinese East Coast in the Pacific region. Meanwhile, China's Western region has remained relatively underdeveloped.

    China's West Coast:

    [​IMG]
    Is China looking to build and use Gwadar in Pakistan as Hong Kong West to accelerate development in its West? Will Gwadar serve as asuperhighway for China's trade expansion in Middle East, Africa and Europe? A point to project Chinese economic and military might westward?

    Unlike the continental United States which has coasts on both the Atlantic and the Pacific Oceans allowing it easy access to Europe and Asia, China has only one coast, its East Coast along South China Sea.

    As the Americans look to Asia with the US Pivot to Asia and the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP), the Chinese are looking to expand westward with Central Asia as well as Africa, Europe and the Middle East with "One Road One Belt" initiative funded by Silk Road Fund and Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB). Pakistan is a crucial partner in this strategy, particularly the development of Pakistan-China Corridorlinking China's western region with Gwadar port on the Arabia Sea.

    Gwadar Deep Sea Port:

    The Chinese see Gwadar deep sea port and the town of Jiwani as Hong Kong West, a gateway to Middle East, Africa and Europe. It will be the most important link in China's Maritime Silk Route (MSR), a sort of superhighway to the West for Chinese trade.

    Professor Juan Cole of University of Michigan has aptly described the Chinese strategy as follows:

    China’s enormous northwest is much closer to the Arabian Sea than to the port of Shanghai. It is about 2800 km. from Urumqi (pop. 4 million, the size of Los Angeles inside city limits) to Karachi, but twice as far to Shanghai. China has decided to develop its northwest by turning Pakistan into a sort of Hong Kong West. Hong Kong played, and perhaps still plays an important role as a gateway for certain kinds of foreign investment into China. In the same way, Pakistan can be a window on the world and a conduit for oil and trade into northwestern cities such as Urumqi and the smaller Kashgar (pop. 1 mn.)
    In addition to a major expansion of the deep sea port, there are plans in place for building a modern city with several skyscrapers, an international airport, highways and industrial parks in Gwadar, Balochistan. There will be air, road and rail links to move people and freight to and from around the world. Oil and gas pipelines are planned to transport energy as well. When completed, it will be comparable to major international port cities of Dubai, Hong Kong and Singapore.

    Baloch Insurgency:

    Baloch insuegency is cited as a key threat to the implementation of the China-Pakistan Corridor in Pakistan. What is often not acknowledged by analysts is the fact that the Baloch insurgency is dying. It's a fact that has recently described in some detail by Malik Siraj Akbar who is sympathetic to the Baloch separatist cause. Here's what Akbar wrote in December 2014 in a piece titled "The End of Pakistan's Baloch Insurgency?":

    "Since its beginning in 2004, the Pakistan's Baloch insurgency is caught up in the worst infighting ever known to the general public. Different left-wing underground armed groups that had been fighting Islamabad for a free Baloch homeland have now started to attack each other's camps......Frustration, suspicion, infighting and division are the common features of the end of a guerrilla fight. Perhaps that time has come in Balochistan. "

    The announcement of the Pak-China deal seems to have re-energized those who seek to hurt Pakistan. They are now trying to resuscitate the dying Baloch insurgency. Western media has widely publicized an interview of Bramdagh Bugti who is running the insurgency from the comfort of a Swiss hotel room. In addition, Pakistan's western-funded NGOs are being used to play up the Baloch insurgency in the media with events like "Un-Silencing Balochistan" event and by blaming the ISI for the murder of Karachi activist Sabeen Mahmud.

    Summary:

    The China-Pak Corridor deal could prove to be transformational for Pakistan's economy, prosperity and rising living standards of its nearly 200 million people. As development work moves forward for Gwadar and China-Pakistan Corridor, I fully expect several hostile nations, including neighboring India, to use their proxies on the ground in Balochistan and some members of the "civil society" made up of someforeign-funded NGOs in Pakistan to make progress as difficult as possible. There will be serious efforts by many to resuscitate the dying Baloch insurgency. Pakistani people and both civil and military leaders need to be prepared to deal with these hurdles.

    Related Links:

    Haq's Musings

    Who Killed Sabeen Mahmud? Why?

    Xi Jinping in Pakistan

    Pak-China Industrial Corridor

    American Hypocrisy on Dr. Afridi's Sentence

    Post Cold War World: Pakistan-China-Russia Vs India-US-Japan

    How Strategic Are China-Pakistan Ties?

    Alaska Permanent Fund: A Model For Balochistan?

    Has Modi Stepped Up India's Covert War in Pakistan?

    Serious Issues Undermining Baloch Insurgency


    Haq's Musings: Will Pakistan's Gwadar Become "Hong Kong West"?
     
  2. Ammyy

    Ammyy BANNED

    Messages:
    7,394
    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2010
    Ratings:
    +1 / 6,354 / -14
    Country:
    India
    Location:
    India
    Well I think its totally depend on China, now they operates, own rights for this port. They just need basic infrastructure to reach gwadar and send their goods from this port. Nothing else.
     
  3. chou.wong

    chou.wong FULL MEMBER

    New Recruit

    Messages:
    51
    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2015
    Ratings:
    +0 / 40 / -0
    Country:
    China
    Location:
    China
    vile character
     
  4. M.SAAD

    M.SAAD FULL MEMBER

    Messages:
    1,994
    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2011
    Ratings:
    +3 / 2,928 / -4
    Country:
    Pakistan
    Location:
    Pakistan
    We need to get rid of all insurgents and Islamic Fundamentalists/Extremists and Pakistan would emerge as a prosperous country...
     
  5. RiazHaq

    RiazHaq SENIOR MEMBER

    Messages:
    5,180
    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2009
    Ratings:
    +58 / 5,411 / -0
    Country:
    Pakistan
    Location:
    United States
    India's worries about Pak-China Industrial Corridor:

    Recent pictures of the Chinese President Xi Jinping's aircraft being escorted by eight made-in-China Pakistani JF-17 Thunder fighter jets as it entered the Pakistani airspace reflect the expanding relationship of the two countries. On his two-day visit to Islamabad in April, Xi committed $46 billion of investments in Pakistan. This is roughly three times the foreign direct investment Pakistan has received in the last decade. This is also more than the $31 billion Pakistan got in US aid since 2002, according to the US-based Congressional Research Service. Clearly, Xi's visit has larger geopolitical ramifications. And for India, it could be a cause for concern.
    The investment would go into building the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor. This would include a road connecting Gwadar port in Balochistan with Kashgar in Xinjiang province of China via Azad Kashmir. The 3,000-km corridor would have industrial parks and 10.4 GW of power projects worth $15.5 billion. China is already upgrading the 1,300-km Karakoram Highway despite Indian opposition. The highway, being built by state-owned China Road & Bridge Corporation, is expected to be ready by September this year. China's help in developing infrastructure in the disputed part of Kashmir is seen as its support to Pakistan's claim on this region.


    Another reason to worry for India is that China has the rights to operate the Gwadar port, which increases Beijing's influence in the Arabian Sea. The new road and the Gwadar port would help China boost trade with Europe, West Asia and Africa. This will also give China easier access to West Asian oil, especially from Iran. China is one of the biggest consumers of Iranian oil and this route would help it transport oil before it completes a pipeline from Gwadar to Kashgar. Beijing is also helping Islamabad complete the Iran-Pakistan gas pipeline at a cost of $2 billion.
    The growing engagement between China and Pakistan may prove to be a stumbling block for India's ambitious plans to boost ties with Afghanistan and Iran. India had committed $100 million to develop the Chabahar port in Iran, but the project is stuck. The port is important for India to access Afghanistan by bypassing Pakistan. Islamabad has already rejected New Delhi's proposal on the SAARC motor vehicle pact that would have allowed seamless transit to vehicles from South Asian countries. Pakistan's refusal makes it impossible for Indian transporters to use the land route to Afghanistan. Prime Minister Narendra Modi, on April 28, told the visiting Afghan President Ashraf Ghani that India was ready to receive Afghan trucks at the Integrated Check Post at Attari, on the India-Pakistan border. But that won't be enough.
    Meanwhile, the infrastructure projects Chinese companies are executing in Pakistan will allow free movement to vehicles of the two countries. And while China's relations with India are also improving - Xi visited India in September last year and Modi is heading to China in May - New Delhi will still be wary of Beijing's growing clout in the region.

    China's growing investments in Pakistan could be a headache for India - Business Today