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Gas crisis affects textile, garment factories

bluesky

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Gas crisis affects textile, garment factories
Authorities cite shortage, industrialists blame leakage
Emran Hossain | Published: 01:50, Apr 14,2021


About 500 textile and garment factories are operating at half or less capacity for a persistent gas crisis triggered by a pipeline leakage, complained leaders of the sectors.
Gas is used in factories in Narayanganj, Narsingdi and Gazipur, known as the textile and garment manufacturing hubs, for generating captive power as the national grid cannot meet their demand.

Gas authorities, however, blamed a supply shortage of liquefied natural gas for the crisis, refusing to accept that there was a fault in their pipeline. ‘The leakage that appeared in a gas pipeline in Haripur of Madanpur a month ago is still there, leaking gas,’ Bangladesh Textile Mills Association director Azahar Khan told New Age.

A stench has filled areas adjacent to the leakage where people are also taking ill from continuously inhaling methane, he said. Azahar, chairman of Mithila Textile, is using only 20 per cent of its production capacity through alternative measures. ‘There are about 250 textile and garment factories in Naryanganj that are similarly hit by the gas crisis,’ he said.

Industrialists said that the gas leakage appeared with a massive bang on March 13 when Titas Gas Transmission and Distribution Company Limited officials were cleaning sludge on the pipe.
‘The gas pressure fell abnormally all of a sudden just after the March 13 leakage of the pipeline,’ said Saleudh Zaman Khan, managing director, NZ Textile Ltd.

NZ textile employs 7,000 workers at Bhulta in Narsingdi and its daily production has fallen by up to 60 per cent ever since the leakage occurred in the pipeline. On Tuesday, the gas pressure fell to five PSI on an average against the demand of about 20 PSI in Narsingdi area.

About 200 factories are hit hard by the fall in the gas pressure with some of them suspending productions. Titas Gas managing director Ali Iqbal Md Nurullah rejected any suggestion of a leakage in their pipeline.
‘There is no leakage anywhere in my knowledge,’ said Iqbal. ‘The gas crisis is because of the LNG supply shortage,’ he said. On Tuesday, industrialists at places in Gazipur complained that the gas pressure fell down to one PSI.

Israq Spinning Mills managing director Fazlul Haq said that 50 out of 175 machines in four factory units were shut down because of a gas shortage on Tuesday. ‘It is hard to believe the authorities’ indifference toward us. They just do not pay heed to what we have to say,’ said Fazlul, who employs about 3,500 workers in his factory at Dhanua, Gazipur.

Fazlul, also vice-president of the BTMA, said that at least 40 factories were hit by the gas crisis in his area.

The factories in Gazipur had been used to a low gas pressure during day for long but now they do not get the full pressure in the pipeline even at night. ‘It cannot go on like this. Many of us are planning to close down,’ Mosharaf Group managing director Mohammad Mosharraf Hossain.

Energy and mineral resources secretary Anisur Rahman said that the crisis would lessen by Friday with the LNG supply increasing from around 600 million cubic feet per day to 800 mmcfd. ‘The recent Suez Canal crisis has delayed the LNG delivery to us leading to the crisis,’ he said.

In the 24 hours until 8:00 am on Tuesday, the gas supply was 3,213 mmcfd, far below the capacity of 3,760 mmcfd, with 651 mmcfd of LNG input. The overall gas demand in the country is roughly estimated to be about 4,000 mmcfd.

Bangladesh has the capacity to import 1,000 mmcfd LNG which the country could never fully use.
The LNG supply fell down to as low as 200 mmcfd in January after its price on the spot market had soared.

Households and industrialists have been complaining about an acute gas crisis since November 2020.
Hundreds of thousands of residents in Dhaka woke up to a severe gas crisis in late March after a Titas gas line had been punctured in road development works.
It took more than a day to repair the damage
 

Bilal9

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Gas crisis affects textile, garment factories
Authorities cite shortage, industrialists blame leakage
Emran Hossain | Published: 01:50, Apr 14,2021


About 500 textile and garment factories are operating at half or less capacity for a persistent gas crisis triggered by a pipeline leakage, complained leaders of the sectors.
Gas is used in factories in Narayanganj, Narsingdi and Gazipur, known as the textile and garment manufacturing hubs, for generating captive power as the national grid cannot meet their demand.

Gas authorities, however, blamed a supply shortage of liquefied natural gas for the crisis, refusing to accept that there was a fault in their pipeline. ‘The leakage that appeared in a gas pipeline in Haripur of Madanpur a month ago is still there, leaking gas,’ Bangladesh Textile Mills Association director Azahar Khan told New Age.

A stench has filled areas adjacent to the leakage where people are also taking ill from continuously inhaling methane, he said. Azahar, chairman of Mithila Textile, is using only 20 per cent of its production capacity through alternative measures. ‘There are about 250 textile and garment factories in Naryanganj that are similarly hit by the gas crisis,’ he said.

Industrialists said that the gas leakage appeared with a massive bang on March 13 when Titas Gas Transmission and Distribution Company Limited officials were cleaning sludge on the pipe.
‘The gas pressure fell abnormally all of a sudden just after the March 13 leakage of the pipeline,’ said Saleudh Zaman Khan, managing director, NZ Textile Ltd.

NZ textile employs 7,000 workers at Bhulta in Narsingdi and its daily production has fallen by up to 60 per cent ever since the leakage occurred in the pipeline. On Tuesday, the gas pressure fell to five PSI on an average against the demand of about 20 PSI in Narsingdi area.

About 200 factories are hit hard by the fall in the gas pressure with some of them suspending productions. Titas Gas managing director Ali Iqbal Md Nurullah rejected any suggestion of a leakage in their pipeline.
‘There is no leakage anywhere in my knowledge,’ said Iqbal. ‘The gas crisis is because of the LNG supply shortage,’ he said. On Tuesday, industrialists at places in Gazipur complained that the gas pressure fell down to one PSI.

Israq Spinning Mills managing director Fazlul Haq said that 50 out of 175 machines in four factory units were shut down because of a gas shortage on Tuesday. ‘It is hard to believe the authorities’ indifference toward us. They just do not pay heed to what we have to say,’ said Fazlul, who employs about 3,500 workers in his factory at Dhanua, Gazipur.

Fazlul, also vice-president of the BTMA, said that at least 40 factories were hit by the gas crisis in his area.

The factories in Gazipur had been used to a low gas pressure during day for long but now they do not get the full pressure in the pipeline even at night. ‘It cannot go on like this. Many of us are planning to close down,’ Mosharaf Group managing director Mohammad Mosharraf Hossain.

Energy and mineral resources secretary Anisur Rahman said that the crisis would lessen by Friday with the LNG supply increasing from around 600 million cubic feet per day to 800 mmcfd. ‘The recent Suez Canal crisis has delayed the LNG delivery to us leading to the crisis,’ he said.

In the 24 hours until 8:00 am on Tuesday, the gas supply was 3,213 mmcfd, far below the capacity of 3,760 mmcfd, with 651 mmcfd of LNG input. The overall gas demand in the country is roughly estimated to be about 4,000 mmcfd.

Bangladesh has the capacity to import 1,000 mmcfd LNG which the country could never fully use.
The LNG supply fell down to as low as 200 mmcfd in January after its price on the spot market had soared.

Households and industrialists have been complaining about an acute gas crisis since November 2020.
Hundreds of thousands of residents in Dhaka woke up to a severe gas crisis in late March after a Titas gas line had been punctured in road development works.
It took more than a day to repair the damage
There is no bribe or graft money in repairing gas pipelines, only in building them.
 

bluesky

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About 200 factories are hit hard by the fall in the gas pressure with some of them suspending productions. Titas Gas managing director Ali Iqbal Md Nurullah rejected any suggestion of a leakage in their pipeline.
‘There is no leakage anywhere in my knowledge,’ said Iqbal. ‘The gas crisis is because of the LNG supply shortage,’ he said. On Tuesday, industrialists at places in Gazipur complained that the gas pressure fell down to one PSI.
Being a construction laborer, I have seen a few underground iron pipe corrosions. One I remember is inside the now-defunct Ghorasal Urea Fertilizer Factory. The underground pipes were found all corrosioned after inspection by the mechanical/piping engineers of Toyo Engineering when I had also the opportunity to visit the factory as a baggage carrier.

Toyo removed all the previous pipes and replaced them with new corrosion-resistant ones. The factory was renovated by Toyo Engineering after the inspection. It was during the Ershad period.

Ductile iron pipe is somewhat resistant to internal corrosion. A variety of linings are available to reduce or eliminate corrosion, including cement mortar, polyurethane, and polyethylene. Of these, cement mortar lining is by far the most common.

The Titas authority should make spot examinations of the situation because the pipes were laid many decades ago when Ductile Iron Pipes was probably not in use.

The same goes for WASA pipes. With my little experience, I can say that corrosion of its pipes is responsible for the yellow Ganges water coming out of the household pipes that we are forced to drink.

I always lament the involvement of foreign suppliers or contractors in our country in easy projects. By knowing this nature, I will not be surprised if our great Bangladesh govt is considering asking a Chinese company to replace both the Titas and WASA pipelines.

Rather, the present issues should be taken as an opportunity to build up a few piping industries in the country whose productions can be used to replace the present corrosion pipes. It is the responsibility of a govt authority to provide correct specifications to these companies.

This is how a country gradually and step by step industrializes itself. Unfortunately, we are moving backward because we are unable to do the maintenance works by ourselves with our own industrial products.

@Homo-Sapiens
 
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Saiful Islam

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Being a laborer, I have seen a few underground iron pipe corrosions. One I remember is inside the now-defunct Ghorasal Urea Fertilizer Factory. The underground pipes were found all corrosioned after inspection by the mechanical/piping engineers of Toyo Engineering when I had also the opportunity to visit the factory as a bag carrier.

Toyo removed all the previous pipes and replaced them with new corrosion-resistant ones. The factory was renovated by Toyo Engineering after the inspection. It was during the Ershad period.

Ductile iron pipe is somewhat resistant to internal corrosion. A variety of linings are available to reduce or eliminate corrosion, including cement mortar, polyurethane, and polyethylene. Of these, cement mortar lining is by far the most common.

The Titas authority should make spot examinations of the situation because the pipes were laid many decades ago when Ductile Iron Pipes was probably not in use.

The same goes for WASA pipes. With my little experience, I can say that corrosion of its pipes is responsible for the yellow Ganges water coming out of the household pipes that we are forced to drink.

I always lament the involvement of foreign suppliers or contractors in our country in easy projects. By knowing this nature, I will not be surprised if our great Bangladesh govt is considering asking a Chinese company to clean both the Titas and WASA pipelines.

Rather, the present issues should be taken as an opportunity to build up a few piping industries in the country whose productions can be used to replace the present corrosion pipes. It is the responsibility of a govt authority to provide correct specifications to these companies.

This is how a country gradually and step by step industrializes itself. Unfortunately, we are moving backward because we are unable to do the maintenance works by ourselves with our own industrial products.

@Homo-Sapiens
Go and help them
 

bluesky

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Go and help them
Help whom? I am too small a nut to be ridiculed by others. But, I hope you will agree that talking of development without prior industrialization is a hoax, especially if it is done with foreign loans.

This is why I think the govt authorities should borrow less and ask the locals to produce industrial products that have demand with the govt projects. Titas Gas and Dhaka WASA are two such cases.
 
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ARMalik

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I am sure BD leaders will get the country out of such crisis because they are sincere in the development of their people, unlike the Corruption Mafia ruling Pakistan unfortunately.
 

bluesky

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I am sure BD leaders will get the country out of such crisis because they are sincere in the development of their people, unlike the Corruption Mafia ruling Pakistan unfortunately.
No Sir, Mafia or not, BD govt leaders are following exactly the same past examples of Pakistan that are causing it to suffer economically. That is borrowing in two hands from foreign sources to build a few fancy projects and propagate that BD is developing when industries remain unbuilt.

BD's external borrowing stands at $73 billion and Pakistan's $93 billion. No big difference. I have no objection if this borrowed dollar is extended to private enterprises so that they can import machines to build industrial plants in the country.

BD's net borrowing will soon exceed $100 billion. Only @2% interest rate, the interest payment itself will be $2 billion per year. This is simple math.
 

Saiful Islam

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Help whom? I am too small a nut to be ridiculed by others. But, I hope you will agree that talking of development without prior industrialization is a hoax, especially if it is done with foreign loans.

This is why I think the govt authorities should borrow less and ask the locals to produce industrial products that have demand with the govt projects. Titas Gas and Dhaka WASA are two such cases.
Help whom? I am too small a nut to be ridiculed by others. But, I hope you will agree that talking of development without prior industrialization is a hoax, especially if it is done with foreign loans.

This is why I think the govt authorities should borrow less and ask the locals to produce industrial products that have demand with the govt projects. Titas Gas and Dhaka WASA are two such cases.
Your expertise and advice should not go amiss, the BD government needs to hear this..
Why do we have smart heads on Pdf but the ground reality is different?

Obviously the country is a shambles
 

fallstuff

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Being a construction laborer, I have seen a few underground iron pipe corrosions. One I remember is inside the now-defunct Ghorasal Urea Fertilizer Factory. The underground pipes were found all corrosioned after inspection by the mechanical/piping engineers of Toyo Engineering when I had also the opportunity to visit the factory as a baggage carrier.

Toyo removed all the previous pipes and replaced them with new corrosion-resistant ones. The factory was renovated by Toyo Engineering after the inspection. It was during the Ershad period.

Ductile iron pipe is somewhat resistant to internal corrosion. A variety of linings are available to reduce or eliminate corrosion, including cement mortar, polyurethane, and polyethylene. Of these, cement mortar lining is by far the most common.

The Titas authority should make spot examinations of the situation because the pipes were laid many decades ago when Ductile Iron Pipes was probably not in use.

The same goes for WASA pipes. With my little experience, I can say that corrosion of its pipes is responsible for the yellow Ganges water coming out of the household pipes that we are forced to drink.

I always lament the involvement of foreign suppliers or contractors in our country in easy projects. By knowing this nature, I will not be surprised if our great Bangladesh govt is considering asking a Chinese company to replace both the Titas and WASA pipelines.

Rather, the present issues should be taken as an opportunity to build up a few piping industries in the country whose productions can be used to replace the present corrosion pipes. It is the responsibility of a govt authority to provide correct specifications to these companies.

This is how a country gradually and step by step industrializes itself. Unfortunately, we are moving backward because we are unable to do the maintenance works by ourselves with our own industrial products.

@Homo-Sapiens
Underground metallic pipes carrying flammable and hazardous material needs corrosion detection system.

Cathodic protection is a technique used to control the corrosion of a metal surface by making it the cathode of an electrochemical cell. A simple method of protection connects the metal to be protected to a more easily corroded "sacrificial metal" to act as the anode.

 

bluesky

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Underground metallic pipes carrying flammable and hazardous material needs corrosion detection system.

Cathodic protection is a technique used to control the corrosion of a metal surface by making it the cathode of an electrochemical cell. A simple method of protection connects the metal to be protected to a more easily corroded "sacrificial metal" to act as the anode.

Thanks for the input. I am surprised to read there is a corrosion detection method. The existing pipes were laid about 7 decades ago when, probably, the system you have mentioned was not available. Science and technology are progressing leaps and frogs, but we live still in the 12th century.

Note that the gas lines were not laid by our people and which foreign company did it I have no knowledge. Now, without doing even a minimal inspection Titas big brass is claiming there are no corrosion and no leakage.

I would like our Deshi companies to be involved in the production of Ductile Iron Pipes and Titas gas should ask a local company to replace the pipes. The pipe length must be a few thousand km. So, a few new factories can be built with govt and Titas support.

However, as usual, I suspect the govt will be seeking foreign loans and will award the contract to another foreign company that will import all the pipes and other necessities, and our Good Govt will add this money to the GDP figure and will as usual claim it is creating a Golden Bangladesh.

What a hypocrisy!! This is going on since 1947. However, pre-1971 was better.
 
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UKBengali

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No Sir, Mafia or not, BD govt leaders are following exactly the same past examples of Pakistan that are causing it to suffer economically. That is borrowing in two hands from foreign sources to build a few fancy projects and propagate that BD is developing when industries remain unbuilt.

BD's external borrowing stands at $73 billion and Pakistan's $93 billion. No big difference. I have no objection if this borrowed dollar is extended to private enterprises so that they can import machines to build industrial plants in the country.

BD's net borrowing will soon exceed $100 billion. Only @2% interest rate, the interest payment itself will be $2 billion per year. This is simple math.

Those numbers are meaningless as they do not take into account debt as gdp ratio.

BD is at 20% while Pakistan is at 30%.

Why should it matter if borrowing exceeds 100 billion dollars as the economy is expected to be 500 billion US dollars in 2025 by IMF?

External debt to GDP ratio is not expected to rise as a proportion of the economy anymore, as a lot of the really expensive infrastructure like Roopur nuclear power plant currently being built has already been factored into the debt figures.

Like already mentioned to you many times, you cannot make the economy grow without building the required infrastructure.

All these things like power stations, railways, roads, bridges and metros are all required both for the economy and to make the country a more liveable place.

I only replied as I want foreigners to get a more true picture of the government’s handling of the BD economy and not have them misled by a narrow viewpoint that does not look at the BD economy in a more holistic way.
 

bluesky

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Those numbers are meaningless as they do not take into account debt as gdp ratio.

BD is at 20% while Pakistan is at 30%.

Why should it matter if borrowing exceeds 100 billion dollars as the economy is expected to be 500 billion US dollars in 2025 by IMF?

External debt to GDP ratio is not expected to rise as a proportion of the economy anymore, as a lot of the really expensive infrastructure like Roopur nuclear power plant currently being built has already been factored into the debt figures.

Like already mentioned to you many times, you cannot make the economy grow without building the required infrastructure.

All these things like power stations, railways, roads, bridges and metros are all required both for the economy and to make the country a more liveable place.

I only replied as I want foreigners to get a more true picture of the government’s handling of the BD economy and not have them misled by a narrow viewpoint that does not look at the BD economy in a more holistic way.
You must be quite a daft punk not to know about the process of national economic progress of a country, any country. Stuoid, do you think Rooppur at $12 billion is needed in a country like BD? However, I will support it if BD people can build such things by themselves and not by foreign loans.

Read all the texts on the national economic development available in respectable libraries and bookstores and tell me just one story that says any of today's developed countries has ever developed with loans from international loan sharks like, ADB, IMF, WB, or others.

Tell me one such big story and oblige me thereby. I challenge you that you will not see any country that did not develop with the participation of its own people, and by creating and recreating its own wealth through industrialization and production. I hope at least BD can produce High Tensile Bolts. can it really do so?

How many more years a weasel as you are will take to learn the basic process of national economic progress? And, are not you the stupid one who was proposing a $16 billion Bullet Train project?

People should nurture their minds by learning from informative books. You remain the most idiotic fellow among all the idiots.
 
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UKBengali

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You must be quite a daft punk not to know about the process of national economic progress of a country, any country. Stuoid, do you think Rooppur at $12 billion is needed in a country like BD? However, I will support it if BD people can build such things by themselves and not by foreign loans.

Read all the texts on the national economic development available in respectable libraries and bookstores and tell me just one story that says any of today's developed countries has ever developed with loans from international loan sharks like, ADB, IMF, WB, or others.

Tell me one such big story and oblige me thereby. I challenge you that you will not see any country that did not develop with the participation of its own people, and by creating and recreating its own wealth through industrialization and production. I hope at least BD can produce High Tensile Bolts. can it really do so?

How many more years a weasel as you are will take to learn the basic process of national economic progress? And, are not you the stupid one who was proposing a $16 billion Bullet Train project?

People should nurture their minds by learning from informative books. You remain the most idiotic fellow among all the idiots.
Again you think you know more than CEBR and IMF who think BD economy will grow strongly out till 2035 at least?
CEBR does not have anything to gain for its forecasts as it does not provide loans to any country.
Please furnish us with your PhD in economics and then we may take you seriously over those organisations filled with Phds in the subject

As regards the high-speed line from Dhaka to Chittagong, it is not 16 billion US dollars but 11. The other 5 billion is for a different project.
You obviously missed the part of the offer that had both lower interest rate than the Chinese loan and more importantly the fact that BD can select its own companies to be involved in the project.
This is a very good opportunity for BD to learn how to build a high-speed railway.Maybe after this project is complete by 2030-2035, other lines could be built wholly by BD companies, with a little assistance by expert consultants to fully train local ones.

I know this post will not get through your one-track skull but it is for others benefit and not yours.
 

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