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HAIDER

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Fuel loading starts for nuclear power plant testing
Khaleeq KianiUpdated 02 Dec 2020
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Pakistan on Tuesday started loading fuel to the 1,100MW nuclear power plant in Karachi for testing in run-up to its commercial operations in April 2021. — Reuters/File

Pakistan on Tuesday started loading fuel to the 1,100MW nuclear power plant in Karachi for testing in run-up to its commercial operations in April 2021. — Reuters/File



ISLAMABAD: Pakistan on Tuesday started loading fuel to the 1,100MW nuclear power plant in Karachi for testing in run-up to its commercial operations in April 2021 while the Azad Jammu and Kashmir government signed agreements with a Chinese company for construction of a 700MW hydropower project.
A spokesperson for the Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC) said fuel loading for the newly built Karachi Nuclear Power Plant Unit-2 (K-2) was started on Tuesday after obtaining fuel load permit from the Pakistan Nuclear Regulatory Authority.
K-2 is a pressurised water reactor based on the Chinese HPR-1000 technology and a third generation plant equipped with advanced safety features, according to the spokesperson. The construction of K-2 plant started on Aug 31, 2015 and its commercial operation will begin in April 2021 after undergoing several operational and safety tests.
Agreements signed with Chinese firm for construction of hydropower project in Azad Kashmir
K-2 is one of the two 1,100MW nuclear power plants being constructed at Karachi. The other plant, K-3, is expected to become operational by the end of 2021. The completion of these nuclear power plants has remained largely on schedule despite the difficult times due to Covid-19 pandemic. The fuel loading was witnessed by Director General of the Strategic Plan Division Lt Gen Nadeem Zaki Manj, PAEC Chairman Mohammad Naeem and senior Chinese and Pakistani officials.
Separately, the AJK government and Chinese firm China Gezhouba Group and its local partner Laraib Group signed implementation agreement and water use charges agreement for construction of Azad Pattan Hydropower Project as part of the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC).
With an investment of over $1.35 billion, the 700.7MW project would involve no fuel import and enable the country to move towards cheaper and greener power generation, said AJK Prime Minister Raja Farooq Haider Khan on the occasion.
Federal Minister for Power Omer Ayub Khan, Minister for Planning Asad Umar, Chairman of defunct-CPEC Authority retd Lt Gen Asim Saleem Bajwa, AJK Chief Secretary Dr Shahzad Khan Bangash and Managing Director of Private Power and Infrastructure Board (PPIB) Shah Jahan Mirza attended the agreement signing ceremony.
The project agreements — GoAJ&K Implementation Agreement and GoAJ&K Water Use Agreement — were signed by Zafar Mahmood Khan, electricity secretary of AJK, and Li Xiaotao, CEO of Azad Pattan Power Private Limited.
The Government of Pakistan Implementation Agreement, Government of Punjab Water Use Agreement and Tripartite Power Purchase Agreements of the project had already been signed in the presence of Prime Minister Imran Khan in July this year. Tuesday’s agreement signing will enable the achievement of financial close of the project.
The letter of support (LOS) for the project was issued by the PPIB to Azad Pattan Power Project Limited. It is a run-off-the river scheme on River Jhelum located at the dual boundary between AJK (Bagh district) and Punjab (Rawalpindi district).
China Gezhouba Group and Laraib Group Pakistan are the shareholders of the project. The consortium of lenders consists of China Development Bank, China Construction Bank, Industrial and Commercial Bank of China and Bank of China.
Azad Pattan Project is being implemented by the PPIB under the Policy for Power Generation Projects 2002 on built, own, operate and transfer basis for a term of 30 years after which it will be transferred to the AJK government free of cost. The project is expected to provide about 3,266 GWh electricity per year to the national grid by 2027.
The project would a play crucial role in stimulating local economy by providing employment and business opportunities during its construction periods, said the ministry of power. The governments of AJK and Punjab would earn significant amount of revenue on account of taxes, fees, etc.
Published in Dawn, December 2nd, 2020
 

The Accountant

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Good news. Out of many shortcuts and poor decisions this was a good decision on part of pmln regime.

Personally i feel it was establishment and PAEC behind this project however still it started during pmln regime therefore i have to give credit to that nikammi government.

This will bring down pressure on oil imports and electricity problem of karachi.

Does anybody has any data on cost per unit difference of these plants v/s oil ?

@niaz sir your comments ?
 

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Does anybody has any data on cost per unit difference of these plants v/s oil ?

@niaz sir your comments ?
A- No idea about cost comparison with this specific nuclear plant.
B- In general, 'almost' any other resource gives lesser LCoE than oil.
C- Here are some stats to give you idea of using oil as electricity source around the world;
i - https://data.worldbank.org/indicator/EG.ELC.PETR.ZS
ii- https://www.businessinsider.com/these-are-the-countries-that-get-the-most-power-from-oil-2015-3

Regards.
 

niaz

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Honorable Accountant.

I am primarily an Oil & Gas person but since I am also interested in “Energy” in general, I know how to get at the latest information about the Economics of Nuclear Power.

The “Fuel cost” only of nuclear energy is normally less than 0.50 cent (75 paisa) per unit but capital outlay and other costs are very high. To get a true comparison; power engineers have developed the concept of ‘Levelized cost of energy" (LCOE) which is the average total cost of building & operating the plant over its lifetime as per unit of the total electricity production over the plants operating life.

Since all the info is from another source with very little input from me, I am only copying below for what is relevant to your query. The detailed info is available at:


Quote:

“Economics of Nuclear Power”
(Updated March 2020)

  • Nuclear power is cost competitive with other forms of electricity generation, except where there is direct access to low-cost fossil fuels.
  • Fuel costs for nuclear plants are a minor proportion of total generating costs, though capital costs are greater than those for coal-fired plants and much greater than those for gas-fired plants.
  • System costs for nuclear power (as well as coal and gas-fired generation) are very much lower than for intermittent renewables.
  • Providing incentives for long-term, high-capital investment in deregulated markets driven by short-term price signals presents a challenge in securing a diversified and reliable electricity supply system.
  • In assessing the economics of nuclear power, decommissioning and waste disposal costs are fully taken into account.
  • Nuclear power plant construction is typical of large infrastructure projects around the world, whose costs and delivery challenges tend to be under-estimated.


The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency’s (NEA's) calculation of the overnight cost for a nuclear power plant built in the OECD rose from about $1900/kWe at the end of the 1990s to $3850/kWe in 2009. In the 2015 report Projected Costs of Generating Electricity, the overnight costs ranged from $2021/kWe in South Korea to $6215/kWe in Hungary. For China, two comparable figures were $1807/kWe and $2615/kWe. LCOE figures at a 3% discount rate range from $29/MWh in Korea to $64/MWh in the UK, at a 7% discount rate from $40/MWh (Korea) to $101/MWh (UK), and at a 10% rate $51/MWh (Korea) to $136/MWh (UK).

* Prices are approximate and as of March 2017.

Comparing the economics of different forms of electricity generation.

In 2017 the US EIA published figures for the average levelised costs per unit of output (LCOE) for generating technologies to be brought online in 2022, as modelled for its Annual Energy Outlook. These show: advanced nuclear, 9.9 c/kWh; natural gas, 5.7-10.9 c/kWh (depending on technology); and coal with 90% carbon sequestration, 12.3 c/kWh (rising to 14 c/kWh at 30%). Among the non-dispatchable technologies, LCOE estimates vary widely: wind onshore, 5.2 c/kWh; solar PV, 6.7 c/kWh; offshore wind, 14.6 c/kWh; and solar thermal, 18.4 c/kWh.
Unquote

I hope that is a satisfactory answer to your question.
 

HAIDER

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Honorable Accountant.

I am primarily an Oil & Gas person but since I am also interested in “Energy” in general, I know how to get at the latest information about the Economics of Nuclear Power.

The “Fuel cost” only of nuclear energy is normally less than 0.50 cent (75 paisa) per unit but capital outlay and other costs are very high. To get a true comparison; power engineers have developed the concept of ‘Levelized cost of energy" (LCOE) which is the average total cost of building & operating the plant over its lifetime as per unit of the total electricity production over the plants operating life.

Since all the info is from another source with very little input from me, I am only copying below for what is relevant to your query. The detailed info is available at:


Quote:

“Economics of Nuclear Power”
(Updated March 2020)

  • Nuclear power is cost competitive with other forms of electricity generation, except where there is direct access to low-cost fossil fuels.
  • Fuel costs for nuclear plants are a minor proportion of total generating costs, though capital costs are greater than those for coal-fired plants and much greater than those for gas-fired plants.
  • System costs for nuclear power (as well as coal and gas-fired generation) are very much lower than for intermittent renewables.
  • Providing incentives for long-term, high-capital investment in deregulated markets driven by short-term price signals presents a challenge in securing a diversified and reliable electricity supply system.
  • In assessing the economics of nuclear power, decommissioning and waste disposal costs are fully taken into account.
  • Nuclear power plant construction is typical of large infrastructure projects around the world, whose costs and delivery challenges tend to be under-estimated.


The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency’s (NEA's) calculation of the overnight cost for a nuclear power plant built in the OECD rose from about $1900/kWe at the end of the 1990s to $3850/kWe in 2009. In the 2015 report Projected Costs of Generating Electricity, the overnight costs ranged from $2021/kWe in South Korea to $6215/kWe in Hungary. For China, two comparable figures were $1807/kWe and $2615/kWe. LCOE figures at a 3% discount rate range from $29/MWh in Korea to $64/MWh in the UK, at a 7% discount rate from $40/MWh (Korea) to $101/MWh (UK), and at a 10% rate $51/MWh (Korea) to $136/MWh (UK).

* Prices are approximate and as of March 2017.

Comparing the economics of different forms of electricity generation.

In 2017 the US EIA published figures for the average levelised costs per unit of output (LCOE) for generating technologies to be brought online in 2022, as modelled for its Annual Energy Outlook. These show: advanced nuclear, 9.9 c/kWh; natural gas, 5.7-10.9 c/kWh (depending on technology); and coal with 90% carbon sequestration, 12.3 c/kWh (rising to 14 c/kWh at 30%). Among the non-dispatchable technologies, LCOE estimates vary widely: wind onshore, 5.2 c/kWh; solar PV, 6.7 c/kWh; offshore wind, 14.6 c/kWh; and solar thermal, 18.4 c/kWh.
Unquote

I hope that is a satisfactory answer to your question.
Sir,,,, what is the future of fuel cell in consumer market.
 

The Accountant

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Honorable Accountant.

I am primarily an Oil & Gas person but since I am also interested in “Energy” in general, I know how to get at the latest information about the Economics of Nuclear Power.

The “Fuel cost” only of nuclear energy is normally less than 0.50 cent (75 paisa) per unit but capital outlay and other costs are very high. To get a true comparison; power engineers have developed the concept of ‘Levelized cost of energy" (LCOE) which is the average total cost of building & operating the plant over its lifetime as per unit of the total electricity production over the plants operating life.

Since all the info is from another source with very little input from me, I am only copying below for what is relevant to your query. The detailed info is available at:


Quote:

“Economics of Nuclear Power”
(Updated March 2020)

  • Nuclear power is cost competitive with other forms of electricity generation, except where there is direct access to low-cost fossil fuels.
  • Fuel costs for nuclear plants are a minor proportion of total generating costs, though capital costs are greater than those for coal-fired plants and much greater than those for gas-fired plants.
  • System costs for nuclear power (as well as coal and gas-fired generation) are very much lower than for intermittent renewables.
  • Providing incentives for long-term, high-capital investment in deregulated markets driven by short-term price signals presents a challenge in securing a diversified and reliable electricity supply system.
  • In assessing the economics of nuclear power, decommissioning and waste disposal costs are fully taken into account.
  • Nuclear power plant construction is typical of large infrastructure projects around the world, whose costs and delivery challenges tend to be under-estimated.


The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency’s (NEA's) calculation of the overnight cost for a nuclear power plant built in the OECD rose from about $1900/kWe at the end of the 1990s to $3850/kWe in 2009. In the 2015 report Projected Costs of Generating Electricity, the overnight costs ranged from $2021/kWe in South Korea to $6215/kWe in Hungary. For China, two comparable figures were $1807/kWe and $2615/kWe. LCOE figures at a 3% discount rate range from $29/MWh in Korea to $64/MWh in the UK, at a 7% discount rate from $40/MWh (Korea) to $101/MWh (UK), and at a 10% rate $51/MWh (Korea) to $136/MWh (UK).

* Prices are approximate and as of March 2017.

Comparing the economics of different forms of electricity generation.

In 2017 the US EIA published figures for the average levelised costs per unit of output (LCOE) for generating technologies to be brought online in 2022, as modelled for its Annual Energy Outlook. These show: advanced nuclear, 9.9 c/kWh; natural gas, 5.7-10.9 c/kWh (depending on technology); and coal with 90% carbon sequestration, 12.3 c/kWh (rising to 14 c/kWh at 30%). Among the non-dispatchable technologies, LCOE estimates vary widely: wind onshore, 5.2 c/kWh; solar PV, 6.7 c/kWh; offshore wind, 14.6 c/kWh; and solar thermal, 18.4 c/kWh.
Unquote

I hope that is a satisfactory answer to your question.
Thanks for sharing detailed information. So apparently the cost of solar PV and nuclear are the lowest.
 

muhammadhafeezmalik

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Shukriyh Nawaz Sharif,

Not only these Karachi Nuclear Power Project Unit-2 (K-2) & Unit-3 (K-3) but Chashma Nuclear Power Plant Unit-3 and Unit-4 (C-3 & C4) were also started and completed during PMLN tenure.
 
Last edited:

The Accountant

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Sir,,,, what is the future of fuel cell in consumer market.
Shukriyh Nawaz Sharif,

Not only these Karachi Nuclear Power Project Unit-2 (K-2) & Unit-3 (K-3) but Chashma Nuclear Power Plant Unit-3 and Unit-4 (C-3 & C4) were also started and completed during PMLN tenure.
First u decide who is running the show ? Is it military or civilians.

U cant take credit of good things and put responsibility of bad thing on military. Specially for the areas which are specifically out of reach of civilians.

Nuclear plants are under control of paec and complete supervision of military and not federal governement.

Furthermore funds for these are paid by us and not by NS so why thank him ?
 

ps3linux

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Good news. Out of many shortcuts and poor decisions this was a good decision on part of pmln regime.

Personally i feel it was establishment and PAEC behind this project however still it started during pmln regime therefore i have to give credit to that nikammi government.

@niaz sir your comments ?
Unfortunately, much to the chagrin of fanboys K2 agreement was done during Musharraf era, all layouts/cash-flows were finalized during the same era.

Work started during PMLN era so I guess PMLN as usual deserves the credit.

Project director of K2 was an old time family friend.
 

muhammadhafeezmalik

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First u decide who is running the show ? Is it military or civilians.

U cant take credit of good things and put responsibility of bad thing on military. Specially for the areas which are specifically out of reach of civilians.

Nuclear plants are under control of paec and complete supervision of military and not federal governement.

Furthermore funds for these are paid by us and not by NS so why thank him ?
It has nothing to do with Army or establishment tough it is their lust to control this autonomous body as during Musharraf rule it was under the National Command Authority, but in 2010 it made an autonomous body again under direct control of PM, the current Chairman PAEC was Mr. Muhammad Naeem was also appointed by Nawaz Sharif in 2014 who is doing an excellent job he is also current chairman of the Board of Governors of PIEAS an institute for atomic energy, which provides man-force to PAEC, incidentally that institute was also established by Nawaz Sharif in 1997. No army man is in the ranks of PAEC or PIEAS.

Corporate management of the PAEC

Individual figures and authorityOfficial designationTerm mandate
Muhammad NaeemChairman, Pakistan Atomic Energy CommissionChairman
Dr. Ghani AkramMember, PAECMember (Technical)
Dr Adnan AqueelMember, PAECMember (Medical)
Dr. Muhammad SarwarMember, PAECMember (Fuel Cycle)
Mr. Saeed Ur RehmanMember, PAECMember (Power)
Dr. Raja Ali Raza AnwerMember, PAECMember (System)
Mr. Mansoor Ali SheikhFinance Secretary, Ministry of Finance (Pakistan)Member (Finance)
Dr. Muhammad Masood ul HasanMember, PAECMember (Science)
Mr. Syed ZiauddinMember, PAECMember (Engineering)
Engr Munawar Ahmad SolehriaMember, PAECMember (Administration)
Dr. Qamar MehboobMember, PAECMember (Material)


Have you seen any military man in the picture??
1606977777482.png

1606977663156.png

Pic source PAEC: On 26 November 2013, Prime Minister Mr. Muhammad Nawaz Sharif performed ground breaking of a new power program at Karachi near KANUPP. The project, when completed, will provide more than 2000 MW electricity to the grid.
Unfortunately, much to the chagrin of fanboys K2 agreement was done during Musharraf era, all layouts/cash-flows were finalized during the same era.

Work started during PMLN era so I guess PMLN as usual deserves the credit.

Project director of K2 was an old time family friend.
It is financial close which matter for any project, providing/arranging funds for four nuclear power plants is not a smaller feat. Some people mix up Unit-3 and Unit-4 of C-1 which were started during PPP time and completed in November 2013.
 
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