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Frontier Undefined: Pakistan's Himalayan Odyssey

El Sidd

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On August 5, 2019, India revoked the special status of Indian Illegally Occupied Jammu and Kashmir (IIOJK) by abrogating Article 370 and 35A of the Indian constitution. This was followed by the issuing of a new political map where Azad Kashmir was shown as part of IIOJK while Gilgit-Baltistan was incorporated in the newly created union territory of Ladakh. Indian National Security Advisor, Ajit Doval, went on the record to say, “we also have a 106 kilometers long non-contiguous border with Afghanistan (Wakhan Corridor).” The Gilgit-Baltistan assembly condemned the new Indian map and passed a unanimous resolution against it. On August 5, 2020, on the completion of the one-year military siege of Occupied Kashmir, Pakistan has unveiled a new political map where the entire region of IIOJK has been shown as an integral part of Pakistan. In the case of the disputed territory of Indian Illegally Occupied Kashmir (IIOK), Pakistan has reaffirmed the United Nations’ (UN) plebiscite and resolutions.

In the new map, it has been made clear that Siachen was ours yesterday and is ours today as well. Siachen was not clearly demarcated in the 1949 Karachi Agreement that defined the Cease Fire Line (CFL) and instead identified the glacier, beyond NJ 9842, in relation to the land as ‘thence north to the glacier.’ Pakistan has controlled and administered the region since 1947. Several mountaineering and trekking expeditions to the Siachen glacier were authorised by the country. Atlases reflecting the Pakistani Line of Control (LOC) were produced in the US and UK by the National Geographic and Encyclopaedia Britannica as well.

In 1984, through a major airborne operation, India occupied some key peaks in the area while there were no Pakistani troops. In the new map, Ladakh has been shown as a part of Pakistan. Historically people of Gilgit-Baltistan have religious, ethnic and linguistic links with the people of Drass and Kargil. According to R. C Arora, the Dards (people) of Gilgit and Astor ruled the area –evident from the sculptures and drawings found at Khalatse and Hanupatar. Today, 46 percent of its population is Muslim, 40 percent Buddhist and 12 percent Hindu. Drass and Kargil were captured by the liberation forces of Gilgit during the war of 1947/48.

Ladakh had three tehsils, Skardu, Kargil and Ladakh, and was administered by a wazir-e-wazarat who used to reside in Skardu during the winters. Similarly, Indian claims on Sir Creek have been refuted since the new map makes it clear that Pakistan’s border is on the east instead of the west, as claimed by India. Sir Creek is a 96-kilometre strip in the Rann of Kutch, a salt marsh land, that opens to the Arabian sea and divides the Kutch region between Sindh and Gujrat. Pakistan claims the entire creek as its own in accordance with the 9th paragraph of the 1914 resolution, signed between the government of Sindh and Rao Maharaj of Kutch, which demarcated the boundaries between Sindh and Bombay. The creek was made a part of Sindh, setting the boundary on the eastern flank of the creek.

Pakistan claims that Junagadh and Manavadar too have been underscored. Junagadh was a princely state in British India which was given the choice of either merging with India or Pakistan at the time of independence. On August 11, 1947, Nawab Muhammad Mahabat Khanji announced Junagadh’s merger with Pakistan. The ruler of the state was a Muslim whereas the majority population was Hindu—a situation similar to that of IIOK. The Nawab’s decision was not well received by Nehru and Patel who argued that the state has no contiguous border with Pakistan. The Nawab justified his decision by highlighting the state’s sea links with Pakistan. In the meantime, Quadi-e-Azam accepted the accession of Junagadh. In February, 1948, a staged referendum announced that 95 percent of the people voted for India, allowing the Indian army to take action while the Nawab escaped to Karachi. Another interesting point in history is that the prime minister of Junagadh at that time was Sir Shahnawaz Bhutto. The famous Somnath temple is located in Junagadh.

In the new map, the erstwhile FATA has been shown as part of the KP province merged after the 25th constitutional amendment in May 2018. All of Gilgit-Baltistan and Kashmir had been shown in the same colour to show it as one territory. An administrative boundary separating Azad Jammu and Kashmir, as well as Gilgit-Baltistan, has been inserted in the map. There is a clear international border and the border on the eastern side had been extended upto the undefined frontier to demarcate the Indian territory of Himachal Pradesh from the disputed part.

The new map states that there will be a UN sponsored referendum for Kashmir in the future. India has territorial disputes with its other neighbours too. In the new Indian map, the Chinese territory of Aksai Chin has also been shown as part of the union territory of Ladakh. The Nepalese government also rejected the Indian map since its territory, situated in the far west, has also been included as Indian territory. In June 2020, Nepal issued a new map and areas claimed by India, including Kala Pani, Lipulkeh and Limpiyadhura, were included inside Nepal.

The entire Pakistani and Kashmiri leadership has endorsed the new map. It is a bold and visionary decision in the right direction. The government has decided to present the new map to the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation (OIC), UN and other international organisations. The government of Pakistan has also decided to send the country’s official map to all search engines including Google and Yahoo. Prime Minister Imran Khan said, “The new map reflected the sentiments of the Pakistani nation, the principal stance of Kashmiris for their just right of self-determination and the clear negation of illegal annexation by the Indian government”. The new map will be an inspiration for Kashmiri freedom fighters and will be a reminder to the UN to implement its resolution which calls for the right of self-determination through a plebiscite.

Masud Ahmad Khan

The writer is a retired brigadier and freelance columnist.
 

El Sidd

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The Himalayas, which have long been a physical and cultural divide between South and Central Asia, form the northern rampart of the subcontinent, and their western ranges occupy the entire northern end of Pakistan, extending about 200 miles (320 km) into the country. Spreading over Kashmir and northern Pakistan, the western Himalayan system splits into three distinct ranges, which are, from south to north, the Pir Panjal Range, the Zaskar Range, and the Ladakh Range. Farther north is the Karakoram Range, which is a separate system adjoining the Himalayas. This series of ranges varies in elevation from roughly 13,000 feet (4,000 metres) to higher than 19,500 feet (6,000 metres) above sea level. Four of the region’s peaks exceed 26,000 feet (8,000 metres), and many rise to heights of more than 15,000 feet (4,500 metres). These include such towering peaks as Nanga Parbat (26,660 feet [8,126 metres]) and K2, also called Godwin Austen (28,251 feet [8,611 metres]), in the Northern Areas.
K2 (Mount Godwin Austen), in the Karakoram Range, viewed from the Gilgit-Baltistan district of the Pakistani-administered portion of the Kashmir region.
K2 (Mount Godwin Austen), in the Karakoram Range, viewed from the Gilgit-Baltistan district of the Pakistani-administered portion of the Kashmir region.

Several important rivers flow from, or through, the mountains of Kashmir into Pakistan. From the Pir Panjal Range flows the Jhelum River (which bisects the famous Vale of Kashmir); the Indus River descends between the Zaskar and Ladakh ranges; and the Shyok River rises in the Karakoram Range. South of the Pir Panjal is the northwestern extension of the Shiwalik Range (there rising to about 600 to 900 feet [200 to 300 metres]), which extend over the southern part of the Hazara and Murree hills and include the hills surrounding Rawalpindi and neighbouring Islamabad.
The Shyok River near Skardu, Northern Areas, Pakistan.
The Shyok River near Skardu, Northern Areas, Pakistan.© Brian A. Vikander
Beyond the Karakoram Range in the extreme north lies the Uygur Autonomous Region of Xinjiang, China; to the northwest, beyond the Hindu Kush, are the Pamirs, where only the Vākhān (Wakhan Corridor), a narrow strip of Afghan territory, separates Pakistan from Tajikistan. The Himalayan massif was pierced in 1970 when Chinese and Pakistani engineers completed the Karakoram Highway across the Karakoram Range, linking the town of Gilgit in the Northern Areas with Kashgar (Kashi) in Xinjiang. The highway, a marvel of modern technology, carries considerable commerce between the two countries but has promoted little cultural exchange.

The northern mountain barrier influences the precipitation pattern in Pakistan by intercepting monsoon (rain-bearing) winds from the south. Melting snow and glacial meltwater from the mountains also feed the rivers, including the Indus, which emerge from the east-west-aligned ranges to flow southward. Siachen Glacier, one of the world’s longest mountain glaciers, feeds the Nubra River, a tributary of the Shyok. The many glaciers in this region, particularly those of the Karakoram Range, are among the few in the world to have grown in size since the late 20th century.
The northern and western regions of the country are subject to frequent seismic activity—the natural consequence of a geologically young mountain system. Minor earth tremors are common throughout the region. However, a number of earthquakes have been severe and highly destructive, given the fact that many buildings are poorly constructed and that those in the mountains are often precipitously perched. Historically recent major quakes in Pakistan include those in 1935, 1945, 1974, and 2005. The latter two were in the far north of the country, and the 2005 quake—centred in the mountainous border region of the North-West Frontier Province (now Khyber Pakhtunkhwa) and Azad Kashmir—killed some 80,000 to 90,000 people and left the entire area devastated.

The population in this inhospitable northern region is generally sparse, although in a few favoured places it is dense. In most of the tiny settlements of this region, the usual crop is barley; fruit cultivation, especially apricots, is of special importance. Timber, mainly species of pine, is found in some parts, but its occurrence varies with precipitation and elevation. Many slopes have been denuded of cover by excessive timber felling and overgrazing.

The Hindu Kush and the western mountains
In far northern Pakistan the Hindu Kush branches off southwestward from the nodal orogenic uplift known as the Pamir Knot. The ridges of the Hindu Kush generally trend from northeast to southwest, while those of the Karakorams run in a southeast-northwest direction from the knot. The Hindu Kush is made up of two distinct ranges, a main crest line that is cut by transverse streams, and a watershed range to the west of the main range, in Afghanistan, that divides the Indus system of rivers from the Amu Darya (ancient Oxus River) drainage basin. From the Hindu Kush, several branches run southward through the areas of Chitral, Dir, and Swat, in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa. These branches have deep, narrow valleys along the Kunar, Panjkora, and Swat rivers. In the extreme northern portion, the ranges are capped with perpetual snow and ice; high peaks include Tirich Mir, which rises to 25,230 feet (7,690 metres). The valley sides are generally bare on account of their isolation from the precipitation-bearing influences. Toward the south the region is largely covered with forests of deodar (a type of cedar) and pine and also has extensive grasslands.
Pakistan: Hindu Kush
Pakistan: Hindu KushWildflowers blooming in the Hindu Kush in the Chitral district of northern Pakistan.© Brian A. Vikander

The Safid Mountain Range, lying south of the Kābul River and forming a border with Afghanistan, trends roughly east to west and rises throughout to an elevation of about 14,000 feet (4,300 metres). Its outliers are spread over Kohat district, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa. South of the Safid Range are the hills of Waziristan, which are crossed by the Kurram and Tochi rivers, and even farther south is the Gumal River. Comparatively broad mountain passes are located south of the Kābul River. They are, from north to south, the Khyber, Kurram, Tochi, Gomal, and Bolan. The Khyber Pass is of special historical interest: broad enough to allow for the passing of large numbers of troops, it has often been the point of ingress for armies invading the subcontinent.
The Khyber Pass, on Pakistan's northwestern border with Afghanistan.
The Khyber Pass, on Pakistan's northwestern border with Afghanistan.Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.
South of the Gumal River, the Sulaiman Range runs in a roughly north-south direction. The highest point of that range, Takht-e Sulaiman, has twin peaks, the higher of which reaches 18,481 feet (5,633 metres). The Sulaiman Range tapers into the Marri and Bugti hills in the south. The Sulaiman and, farther south, the low Kirthar Range separate the Balochistan plateau from the Indus plain.



The Balochistan plateau
The vast tableland of Balochistan contains a great variety of physical features. In the northeast a basin centred on the towns of Zhob and Loralai forms a trellis-patterned lobe that is surrounded on all sides by mountain ranges. To the east and southeast is the Sulaiman Range, which joins the Central Brahui Range near Quetta, and to the north and northwest is the Toba Kakar Range (which farther west becomes the Khwaja Amran Range). The hilly terrain becomes less severe southwestward in the form of Ras Koh Range. The small Quetta basin is surrounded on all sides by mountains. The whole area appears to form a node of high ranges. West of the Ras Koh Range, the general landform of northwestern Balochistan is a series of low-lying plateaus divided by hills. In the north the Chagai Hills border a region of true desert, consisting of inland drainage and hamuns (playas).

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Southern Balochistan is a vast wilderness of mountain ranges, of which the Central Brahui Range is the backbone. The easternmost Kirthar Range is backed by the Pab Range in the west. Other important ranges of southern Balochistan are the Central Makran Range and the Makran Coast Range, whose steep face to the south divides the coastal plain from the rest of the plateau. The Makran coastal track mostly comprises level mud flats surrounded by sandstone ridges. The isolation of the arid plain has been broken by an ongoing development project at Gwadar, which is linked with Karachi via an improved road transport system.

The submontane plateau
Lying south of the northern mountain rampart, the submontane plateau has four distinct divisions—the Trans-Indus plains, the Potwar Plateau, the Salt Range, and the Sialkot region.

The Trans-Indus plains, west of the Indus River, comprise the hill-girt plateaus of the Vale of Peshawar and of Kohat and Bannu, all of which are oases in the arid, scrub-covered landscape of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa. Of these, the Vale of Peshawar is the most fertile. Gravel or clay alluvial detritus covers much of the area and is formed from loose particles or fragments separated from masses of rock by erosion and other forces. Annual precipitation is generally limited to between 10 and 15 inches (250 and 380 mm), and most of the cultivated area in the Vale of Peshawar is irrigated from canals.
Kohat is less developed than the Vale of Peshawar. Precipitation is about 16 inches (400 mm). Only a small percentage of the cultivated area is canal-irrigated, and its groundwater is not adequately exploited, although the water table is generally high. Much of the area consists of scrub and poor grazing land. The region is much broken by limestone ridges, and the uneven limestone floor is variously filled with lacustrine clays, gravel, or boulders.

In Bannu, about one-fourth of the cultivated area is irrigated. Annual precipitation is low, amounting to about 11 inches (275 mm). Fat-tailed sheep, camels, and donkeys are raised in Kohat and Bannu; wool is an important cash crop.
The Potwar Plateau covers an area of about 5,000 square miles (13,000 square km) and lies at an elevation of some 1,200 to 1,900 feet (350 to 575 metres). It is bounded on the east by the Jhelum River and on the west by the Indus River. On the north, the Kala Chitta Range and Margala Hills (at about 3,000 to 5,000 feet [900 to 1,500 metres]) form its boundary. Toward the south it gradually slopes into the Salt Range, which presents a steep face rising to about 2,000 feet (600 metres) even farther south. The middle of the Potwar Plateau is occupied by the structurally downwarped basin of the Soan River. The general terrain of the basin consists of interlaced ravines, which are locally known as khaderas and are set deep in the soft Shiwalik beds of which the whole area is composed. The surface layer of the area is formed of windblown loessic silt, deteriorating into sand and gravel toward the hill slopes. The small Rawalpindi plain in the north is the location of the twin cities of Rawalpindi and Islamabad.

The Potwar Plateau receives modest annual precipitation, averaging between 15 and 20 inches (380 to 510 mm). Though precipitation is somewhat higher in the northwest, the southwest is very arid. The landscape is dissected and eroded by streams that, during the rains, cut into the land and wash away the soil. The streams are generally deep set and are of little or no use for irrigation. It is generally a poor agricultural area, and its population puts excessive pressure on its resources.
The Salt Range is an extremely arid territory that marks the boundary between the submontane region and the Indus River plain to the south. The highest point of the Salt Range, Mount Sakesar, lies at 4,992 feet (1,522 metres). The Salt Range is of interest to geologists because it contains the most complete geologic sequence in the world, in which rocks from early Cambrian times (about 540 million years ago) to the Pleistocene Epoch (about 2,600,000 to 11,700 years ago) are exposed in an unbroken sequence.

The Sialkot region is a narrow submontane area in the northeast. Unlike the Potwar Plateau, it is a rich agricultural region. Precipitation varies from 25 to 35 inches (650 to 900 mm) per year, and the water table is high, facilitating well (and tube-well) irrigation; the soil is heavy and highly fertile. The population distribution is dense, and the land is divided into small farms on which intensive cultivation is practiced.
 

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