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French researchers to give nicotine patches to coronavirus patients and frontline workers after lowe

Discussion in 'COVID-19 Coronavirus' started by terry5, Apr 23, 2020.

  1. terry5

    terry5 SENIOR MEMBER

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    https://www.sudouest.fr/2020/04/10/...avec-beaucoup-de-precaution-7401913-10861.php

    When world-famous artist David Hockney wrote a letter to the Daily Mail saying he believes smoking could protect people against the coronavirus many scoffed.

    Mr Hockney wrote: 'Could it not be that smokers have developed an immune system to this virus? With all these figures coming out, it’s beginning to look like that to me.'

    Understandably the claim was brushed off as laughable and 'rubbish' by many.

    But is it?


    Doctors at a major hospital in Paris - who also found low rates of smoking among the infected - are now planning to give nicotine patches to COVID-19 patients.

    They will also give them to frontline workers to see if the stimulant has any effect on preventing the spread of the virus, according to reports.

    A leading infectious disease expert at University College London, Professor Francois Balloux, said there is 'bizarrely strong' evidence it could be true.

    And data from multiple Chinese studies shows that COVID-19 hospital patients contained a smaller proportion of smokers than the general population (6.5 per cent compared to 26.6 per cent), suggesting they were less likely to end up in hospital.

    Another study, by America's Centers for Disease Control of over 7,000 people who tested positive for coronavirus, found that just 1.3 per cent of them were smokers - against the 14 per cent of all Americans that the CDC says smoke.


    The study also found that the smokers stood no greater chance of ending up in hospital or an ICU.

    The reasons for this are unclear.

    Evidence coming out of scientific studies is conflicting and some say doctors are just too busy to be accurately noting down everyone's smoking habits.

    Some researchers suggest smoking could reverse one of the ways in which COVID-19 damages the lungs while others argue the lung damage caused by smoke makes the organs more susceptible to failure.

    Governments in both the UK and US urge people to stop smoking to protect themselves from the virus, but scientists admit there is no clear proof cigarettes can worsen the disease.


    Doctors at a major hospital in Paris - who also found low rates of smoking among the infected - are now planning to give nicotine patches to COVID-19 patients.

    They will also give them to frontline workers to see if the stimulant has any effect on preventing the spread of the virus, according to reports.

    It comes after world-famous artist David Hockney last week said he believes smoking could protect people against the deadly coronavirus.

    MailOnline looked at the science and found he may have been onto something, with one researcher saying there was 'bizarrely strong' evidence it could be true.

    One study in China, where the pandemic began, showed only 6.5 per cent of COVID-19 patients were smokers, compared to 26.6 per cent of the population.

    Another study, by the Centers for Disease Control in the US, found just 1.3 per cent of hospitalised patients were smokers - compared to 14 per cent of America.

    And research by hospitals in Paris found that smokers were under-represented in both inpatients and outpatients, suggesting that any protective effect could affect anyone, not just those hospitalised by their illness.


    The French study, performed at Pitié Salpêtrière - part of the Hôpitaux de Paris, used data from 480 patients who tested positive for the virus.

    Three hundred and fifty were hospitalized and the remainder recovered at home.

    Results showed that of the patients hospitalized, with a median age of 65, only 4.4 percent were regular smokers. But among those at home, with a median age of 44, 5.3 percent smoked.

    By comparison, among the general population, 40 percent of those between ages 44 and 53 smoke, and around 11 percent of those aged 65 to 75 smoke.

    The researchers determined that far fewer smokers appear to have contracted the virus or, if they have, their symptoms are less serious.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/...s-coronavirus-patients-frontline-workers.html
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2020