What's new

F-35s Struggle To Fly! Frustrated South Korea Says Its US-Origin Stealth Fighters Marred By Defects

Path-Finder

ELITE MEMBER
Feb 7, 2013
23,418
1
34,869
Country
Pakistan
Location
United Kingdom

F-35s Struggle To Fly! Frustrated South Korea Says Its US-Origin Stealth Fighters Marred By Defects​


By Ashish Dangwal

October 4, 2022

South Korea’s F-35 stealth fighter jets, which it touts as a critical component in deterring North Korean threats, appear to be experiencing severe maintenance challenges.

On October 4, a South Korean lawmaker stated that the nation’s F-35A fighters were labeled as operationally unready 234 times over 18 months ending in June because of malfunctions.

The ruling People Power Party’s Rep Shin Won-sik presented Air Force data to demonstrate the issues the South Korean Air Force is encountering in making F-35s fully operational. He mentioned that the fighters were grounded 172 times during the timeframe.

He also noted 62 cases where the jets could fly but couldn’t complete specific missions. Shin revealed the information, highlighting the need for the South Korean military to exert significant effort in introducing and maintaining such cutting-edge weaponry.

“Grounded fifth-generation fighters could carry out missions for only 12 days on average last year and 11 days in the first half of this year,” Yonhap reported. In contrast, throughout the course of the 18 months, the older generation aircraft F-4E and F-5 were grounded 26 and 28 times, respectively.

However, the South Korean Air Force stated that the F-35As achieved their goal operation rate of 75%, which indicates that sustaining the readiness posture was not a problem.

The service admitted difficulties obtaining parts for defects in the newly launched model. It further noted that it would work to obtain them as soon as possible from the manufacturer.

It is important to remember that Australia made headlines when it intended to spend an astounding AUD14.6 billion ($10.87 billion) to maintain its Lockheed Martin F-35A Lightning II fleet until 2053.

In February 2022, official records showed that Australia’s F-35A fighter would spend less time in the air than previously anticipated. That sparked a national debate about the Royal Australian Air Force’s capability and viability.

The F-35s were in the design stage when Australia agreed in 2002 to purchase up to 100 aircraft. This commitment was driven by the US government and defense giant Lockheed Martin. Similarly, the US Air Force worries that its outdated F-35s are now nothing more than pricey training aircraft.

In 2021, the US Air Force’s deputy chief of staff, Lt. Gen. S Clinton Hinote, voiced significant reservations about the outdated software, noting, “the block that is coming off the line right now is not a block that I feel good about going up against China and Russia.”

He said that a war scenario focusing on the possibility of safeguarding Taiwan from Chinese air attack proved that “every [F-35] that rolls off the line today is a fighter that we wouldn’t even bother putting into these scenarios.”

South Korea F-35 Fighter Jets

In 2014, South Korea ordered 40 F-35A planes for the Air Force under a $6.4 billion contract. Like the US Air Force, the South Korean Air Force operates the F-35A, with the first plane supplied by the manufacturer in 2018.

In January 2022, the nation finished the deployment of 40 F-35As. In March 2022, South Korea announced that Lockheed Martin F-35A Lightning II fighter planes purchased from the United States are operational.

In July, F-35 stealth fighter jets from the US and South Korea collaborated during a 10-day drill designed to warn North Korea for the first time.

The 17th Fighter Wing of the South Korean Air Force operates the F-35 out of Cheongju Air Base. However, the development comes when North Korea is carrying out a series of missile tests, threatening South Korea.

The F-35s fleet of South Korea performed an “elephant walk” on March 25, the day after Pyongyang conducted one of its missile launches, in a show of force. In July, South Korea announced its desire to acquire additional 20 F-35A fighter planes by 2028 to strengthen its aerial strike capabilities.

This choice appears to have been made in response to concerns about Pyongyang’s aggressive military buildup and expanding missile arsenal.

“Using the F-35A stealth fighters, the invisible power capable of stealth infiltration and precise striking, we will achieve an overwhelming strategic victory and maintain a full military posture that will deter further actions by North Korea,” then-Defense Minister Suh Wook said during the elephant walk.

Nonetheless, given North Korea’s increasingly hostile posture, the current information on the South Korean Air Force’s F-35s is concerning.

its a vediq newj outlet and wroiter.
 

OverandOut

FULL MEMBER

New Recruit

Jan 27, 2014
98
1
122
Country
Pakistan
Location
Pakistan
I wont comment on the writer just yet or the source because incompetence is easily exposed if you just dig a little.

So, firstly F35s are a conplex piece of equipment and is a systems of systems. Without proper servicing and maintenance such a system will fail no doubt because each system has its own maintenance requirements. Now if the benefit (capability/unfair advantage) outweighs the cost then complexity makes sense. So you have to have to servicing department up to the task and well trained. Now of course with such a complex systems there will be strings attached such as approved suppliers for parts and the OEMs design authority. This can be worked out to get local mfgs on approved suppliers list but this takes a lot of time but not a problem if you want to do it just that it is time consuming.

So yes, I don’t see the systems being at fault here since the capability and capacity of the F35 system is by far the best out there. Keeping them up in the air is up to the servicing and maintenance.

Clever systems tend to do what they consider is best for the safety of the pilot. Remember, F35 is basically a software and like any software it will have bugs that will remain until agitated by combination of factors. All you do is plug the hole.

There is definitely a bottle neck here that is the systems complexity itself, any part to change or replace has to go back to the OEM for approval and it is always a cascade effect on other systems etc etc.

So all in all this is just an article written on weak leads.
 

TheNoob

SENIOR MEMBER
Sep 7, 2013
3,376
2
2,266
Country
Pakistan
Location
Pakistan
The worst part about a private industry is that it ensures that you can only rely on them for parts and maintenance at an exorbitant cost with no way out of their proprietary tech.
 

Hamartia Antidote

ELITE MEMBER
Nov 17, 2013
31,125
28
20,546
Country
United States
Location
United States
I wont comment on the writer just yet or the source because incompetence is easily exposed if you just dig a little.

So, firstly F35s are a conplex piece of equipment and is a systems of systems. Without proper servicing and maintenance such a system will fail no doubt because each system has its own maintenance requirements.

Plus people are ignoring all the other countries currently flying the F-35

Italy (including on its Cavour carrier)

UK (including on their Queen Elizabeth carrier)
BTW the failed takeoff was due to ground crew failure not the plane.

Netherlands

Australia

Norway

Israel

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DGctNyV1fdY
Denmark
 
Last edited:

beijingwalker

ELITE MEMBER
Nov 4, 2011
54,317
-19
97,083
Country
China
Location
China
Plus people are ignoring all the other countries currently flying the F-35

Italy (including on its Cavour carrier)

UK (including on their Queen Elizabeth carrier)
BTW the failed takeoff was due to ground crew failure not the plane.

Netherlands

Australia

Norway

Israel

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DGctNyV1fdY
Denmark
One crash every year during the past 3 years is still a very high rate for any airplanes in the world.
 

Hamartia Antidote

ELITE MEMBER
Nov 17, 2013
31,125
28
20,546
Country
United States
Location
United States
One crash a year in the past 3 years, this rate is pretty high for any planes.

The 2021 one doesn't count because the ground crew left the pillows in the air intakes. Had nothing to do with the plane.

12937.jpg



800 delivered
 
Last edited:

beijingwalker

ELITE MEMBER
Nov 4, 2011
54,317
-19
97,083
Country
China
Location
China
The 2021 one doesn't count because the ground crew left the pillows in the air intakes. Had nothing to do with the plane.

12937.jpg



800 delivered
Lol, ok, which else doesn't count?
 

kingQamaR

SENIOR MEMBER
Sep 14, 2017
3,880
-5
3,796
Country
United Kingdom
Location
Pakistan
Most expensive fighter in US history with unprecedented cost per flight hour. Was originally meant as an inexpensive fighter to complement the F-22. Just like the Pentagon brass always do, prices ran away.
 

Beast

ELITE MEMBER
Feb 5, 2011
30,559
-51
67,153
Country
China
Location
China
F-35 is lemon. But western media is good in masking this lemon with their constant propaganda, bragging how good it is.

Most expensive fighter in US history with unprecedented cost per flight hour. Was originally meant as an inexpensive fighter to complement the F-22. Just like the Pentagon brass always do, prices ran away.
Never trust american words. If their words can be trusted. Pig can fly.
 

Hamartia Antidote

ELITE MEMBER
Nov 17, 2013
31,125
28
20,546
Country
United States
Location
United States
Lol, ok, which else doesn't count?

Do you have 800 J-15's? Probably more like 50...yet look at all the crashes for that small number.

According to the SCMP, there have been at least four J-15 crashes that have resulted in at least one fatality and one case of serious injury due to what has been described as a series of “unpardonable mechanical failures.”

199611_96476_800_auto_jpg.jpg



 
Last edited:

PradoTLC

SENIOR MEMBER
Mar 17, 2007
6,671
-3
7,379
Country
Pakistan
Location
United Arab Emirates

F-35s Struggle To Fly! Frustrated South Korea Says Its US-Origin Stealth Fighters Marred By Defects​


By Ashish Dangwal

October 4, 2022

South Korea’s F-35 stealth fighter jets, which it touts as a critical component in deterring North Korean threats, appear to be experiencing severe maintenance challenges.

On October 4, a South Korean lawmaker stated that the nation’s F-35A fighters were labeled as operationally unready 234 times over 18 months ending in June because of malfunctions.

The ruling People Power Party’s Rep Shin Won-sik presented Air Force data to demonstrate the issues the South Korean Air Force is encountering in making F-35s fully operational. He mentioned that the fighters were grounded 172 times during the timeframe.

He also noted 62 cases where the jets could fly but couldn’t complete specific missions. Shin revealed the information, highlighting the need for the South Korean military to exert significant effort in introducing and maintaining such cutting-edge weaponry.

“Grounded fifth-generation fighters could carry out missions for only 12 days on average last year and 11 days in the first half of this year,” Yonhap reported. In contrast, throughout the course of the 18 months, the older generation aircraft F-4E and F-5 were grounded 26 and 28 times, respectively.

However, the South Korean Air Force stated that the F-35As achieved their goal operation rate of 75%, which indicates that sustaining the readiness posture was not a problem.

The service admitted difficulties obtaining parts for defects in the newly launched model. It further noted that it would work to obtain them as soon as possible from the manufacturer.

It is important to remember that Australia made headlines when it intended to spend an astounding AUD14.6 billion ($10.87 billion) to maintain its Lockheed Martin F-35A Lightning II fleet until 2053.

In February 2022, official records showed that Australia’s F-35A fighter would spend less time in the air than previously anticipated. That sparked a national debate about the Royal Australian Air Force’s capability and viability.

The F-35s were in the design stage when Australia agreed in 2002 to purchase up to 100 aircraft. This commitment was driven by the US government and defense giant Lockheed Martin. Similarly, the US Air Force worries that its outdated F-35s are now nothing more than pricey training aircraft.

In 2021, the US Air Force’s deputy chief of staff, Lt. Gen. S Clinton Hinote, voiced significant reservations about the outdated software, noting, “the block that is coming off the line right now is not a block that I feel good about going up against China and Russia.”

He said that a war scenario focusing on the possibility of safeguarding Taiwan from Chinese air attack proved that “every [F-35] that rolls off the line today is a fighter that we wouldn’t even bother putting into these scenarios.”

South Korea F-35 Fighter Jets

In 2014, South Korea ordered 40 F-35A planes for the Air Force under a $6.4 billion contract. Like the US Air Force, the South Korean Air Force operates the F-35A, with the first plane supplied by the manufacturer in 2018.

In January 2022, the nation finished the deployment of 40 F-35As. In March 2022, South Korea announced that Lockheed Martin F-35A Lightning II fighter planes purchased from the United States are operational.

In July, F-35 stealth fighter jets from the US and South Korea collaborated during a 10-day drill designed to warn North Korea for the first time.

The 17th Fighter Wing of the South Korean Air Force operates the F-35 out of Cheongju Air Base. However, the development comes when North Korea is carrying out a series of missile tests, threatening South Korea.

The F-35s fleet of South Korea performed an “elephant walk” on March 25, the day after Pyongyang conducted one of its missile launches, in a show of force. In July, South Korea announced its desire to acquire additional 20 F-35A fighter planes by 2028 to strengthen its aerial strike capabilities.

This choice appears to have been made in response to concerns about Pyongyang’s aggressive military buildup and expanding missile arsenal.

“Using the F-35A stealth fighters, the invisible power capable of stealth infiltration and precise striking, we will achieve an overwhelming strategic victory and maintain a full military posture that will deter further actions by North Korea,” then-Defense Minister Suh Wook said during the elephant walk.

Nonetheless, given North Korea’s increasingly hostile posture, the current information on the South Korean Air Force’s F-35s is concerning.



not suprise.... its tech is super complex and machinery more so... it will years to clear out the bugs
 

kingQamaR

SENIOR MEMBER
Sep 14, 2017
3,880
-5
3,796
Country
United Kingdom
Location
Pakistan
F-35 is lemon. But western media is good in masking this lemon with their constant propaganda, bragging how good it is.


Never trust american words. If their words can be trusted. Pig can fly.

F35 is a unremarkable plane. it tries to do so many different things and it makes it mediocre, bring back Specialized Aircraft!
 

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Total: 1, Members: 0, Guests: 1)


Top Bottom