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Experts: Middle East remains key to Bangladesh's fortunes in a changing world

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Experts: Middle East remains key to Bangladesh's fortunes in a changing world​

Dr Lailufar Yasmin dwelts on how the Middle East is perceived as a unified region, which is not the case in reality in terms of governance and power sharing

The experts were deliberating at a roundtable on “The Changing Dynamics of the Middle East: Implications for Bangladesh,” organized by Dhaka Tribune and BIPSS at a Dhaka hotel

The experts were deliberating at a roundtable on “The Changing Dynamics of the Middle East: Implications for Bangladesh,” organized by Dhaka Tribune and BIPSS at a Dhaka hotel

Mahmud Hossain Opu/Dhaka Tribune

Tribune Report
June 29, 2022 1:38 PM

Bangladesh needs to maintain a strategic relationship with Middle Eastern nations as the country is dependent on fossil fuels and foreign remittance, speakers at a roundtable discussion have said.

Despite Bangladesh’s having good relations with Middle Eastern countries, exchanges remain limited to exporting unskilled labour, bringing some investment and small-scale trade, they added.

Fossil fuels have always been a key factor for the Middle East to continue playing its crucial role in global politics. However, being aware of the fact that the era of fossil fuels is coming to an end, many countries in the Middle East have started investing in alternatives, they added.

body-1-6.jpeg
Speaker Major General Muniruzzaman Mahmud Hossain Opu/Dhaka Tribune

The experts were deliberating at a roundtable on “The Changing Dynamics of the Middle East: Implications for Bangladesh,” organized by the leading English daily Dhaka Tribune and Bangladesh Institute of Peace and Security Studies (BIPSS) at a Dhaka hotel as part of a series of discussions on important national and international issues.

BIPSS President Maj Gen ANM Muniruzzaman and Dhaka Tribune Editor Zafar Sobhan jointly moderated the roundtable that was attended by academia, local and foreign diplomats, former and serving government officials, journalists, and university students.

2-62.jpeg
Speaker Lailufar Yasmin
Mahmud Hossain Opu/Dhaka Tribune

Dr Lailufar Yasmin, professor at the department of international relations of Dhaka University, and Parvez Karim Abbasi, assistant professor at the department of economics of East West University, spoke at the event as panellists.

Abbasi presented a comprehensive overview of the importance of the Middle East on the global front, from being a forebear of ancient civilizations to dominating the world as the fulcrum of fossil fuel producers, and the constant political instability in the region initiated by multilateral interested players.


Experts: Middle East remains key to Bangladesh's fortunes in a changing world​

Dr Lailufar Yasmin dwelts on how the Middle East is perceived as a unified region, which is not the case in reality in terms of governance and power sharing





The experts were deliberating at a roundtable on “The Changing Dynamics of the Middle East: Implications for Bangladesh,” organized by Dhaka Tribune and BIPSS at a Dhaka hotel

The experts were deliberating at a roundtable on “The Changing Dynamics of the Middle East: Implications for Bangladesh,” organized by Dhaka Tribune and BIPSS at a Dhaka hotel Mahmud Hossain Opu/Dhaka Tribune
Tribune Report
June 29, 2022 1:38 PM

Bangladesh needs to maintain a strategic relationship with Middle Eastern nations as the country is dependent on fossil fuels and foreign remittance, speakers at a roundtable discussion have said.

Despite Bangladesh’s having good relations with Middle Eastern countries, exchanges remain limited to exporting unskilled labour, bringing some investment and small-scale trade, they added.

Fossil fuels have always been a key factor for the Middle East to continue playing its crucial role in global politics. However, being aware of the fact that the era of fossil fuels is coming to an end, many countries in the Middle East have started investing in alternatives, they added.

body-1-6.jpeg
Speaker Major General Muniruzzaman Mahmud Hossain Opu/Dhaka Tribune

The experts were deliberating at a roundtable on “The Changing Dynamics of the Middle East: Implications for Bangladesh,” organized by the leading English daily Dhaka Tribune and Bangladesh Institute of Peace and Security Studies (BIPSS) at a Dhaka hotel as part of a series of discussions on important national and international issues.

BIPSS President Maj Gen ANM Muniruzzaman and Dhaka Tribune Editor Zafar Sobhan jointly moderated the roundtable that was attended by academia, local and foreign diplomats, former and serving government officials, journalists, and university students.

2-62.jpeg
Speaker Lailufar Yasmin
Mahmud Hossain Opu/Dhaka Tribune

Dr Lailufar Yasmin, professor at the department of international relations of Dhaka University, and Parvez Karim Abbasi, assistant professor at the department of economics of East West University, spoke at the event as panellists.

Abbasi presented a comprehensive overview of the importance of the Middle East on the global front, from being a forebear of ancient civilizations to dominating the world as the fulcrum of fossil fuel producers, and the constant political instability in the region initiated by multilateral interested players.

dt-ad
Dr Lailufar Yasmin dwelt on how the Middle East is perceived as a unified region, which is not the case in reality in terms of governance and power sharing. “Any country in the world, they have certain strategic interests and certain tactical interests. Whether we are talking about Saudi Arabia, the UAE or Iran, their primary strategic objective is to ensure sovereignty and territorial integrity.”

3-46.jpeg
Speaker Zafar Sobhan
Mahmud Hossain Opu/Dhaka Tribune

Parvez Karim said: “Fossil fuels have always been a key factor for the Middle East to continue playing its crucial role in global politics. However, they are aware that their reign of having leverage over the world with fossil fuels is coming to an end. Countries like Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, and the UAE are heavily investing in alternative industries with an eye to a post-fossil fuel world.”


Experts: Middle East remains key to Bangladesh's fortunes in a changing world​

Dr Lailufar Yasmin dwelts on how the Middle East is perceived as a unified region, which is not the case in reality in terms of governance and power sharing





The experts were deliberating at a roundtable on “The Changing Dynamics of the Middle East: Implications for Bangladesh,” organized by Dhaka Tribune and BIPSS at a Dhaka hotel

The experts were deliberating at a roundtable on “The Changing Dynamics of the Middle East: Implications for Bangladesh,” organized by Dhaka Tribune and BIPSS at a Dhaka hotel

Mahmud Hossain Opu/Dhaka Tribune

Tribune Report
June 29, 2022 1:38 PM

Bangladesh needs to maintain a strategic relationship with Middle Eastern nations as the country is dependent on fossil fuels and foreign remittance, speakers at a roundtable discussion have said.

Despite Bangladesh’s having good relations with Middle Eastern countries, exchanges remain limited to exporting unskilled labour, bringing some investment and small-scale trade, they added.

Fossil fuels have always been a key factor for the Middle East to continue playing its crucial role in global politics. However, being aware of the fact that the era of fossil fuels is coming to an end, many countries in the Middle East have started investing in alternatives, they added.

body-1-6.jpeg
Speaker Major General Muniruzzaman Mahmud Hossain Opu/Dhaka Tribune

The experts were deliberating at a roundtable on “The Changing Dynamics of the Middle East: Implications for Bangladesh,” organized by the leading English daily Dhaka Tribune and Bangladesh Institute of Peace and Security Studies (BIPSS) at a Dhaka hotel as part of a series of discussions on important national and international issues.

BIPSS President Maj Gen ANM Muniruzzaman and Dhaka Tribune Editor Zafar Sobhan jointly moderated the roundtable that was attended by academia, local and foreign diplomats, former and serving government officials, journalists, and university students.

2-62.jpeg
Speaker Lailufar Yasmin Mahmud Hossain Opu/Dhaka Tribune

Dr Lailufar Yasmin, professor at the department of international relations of Dhaka University, and Parvez Karim Abbasi, assistant professor at the department of economics of East West University, spoke at the event as panellists.
Abbasi presented a comprehensive overview of the importance of the Middle East on the global front, from being a forebear of ancient civilizations to dominating the world as the fulcrum of fossil fuel producers, and the constant political instability in the region initiated by multilateral interested players.

dt-ad
Dr Lailufar Yasmin dwelt on how the Middle East is perceived as a unified region, which is not the case in reality in terms of governance and power sharing. “Any country in the world, they have certain strategic interests and certain tactical interests. Whether we are talking about Saudi Arabia, the UAE or Iran, their primary strategic objective is to ensure sovereignty and territorial integrity.”

3-46.jpeg
Speaker Zafar Sobhan Mahmud Hossain Opu/Dhaka Tribune

Parvez Karim said: “Fossil fuels have always been a key factor for the Middle East to continue playing its crucial role in global politics. However, they are aware that their reign of having leverage over the world with fossil fuels is coming to an end. Countries like Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, and the UAE are heavily investing in alternative industries with an eye to a post-fossil fuel world.”

The professor thought the political dimension in the Middle East has always had an effect on Bangladesh.

“Over 60 percent of our expatriates work in the Middle East. Yet as a nation, we have failed to grow a strong influence over them. We have friendly relations with the Middle Eastern nations, but our exchange is limited to exporting unskilled labour, bringing some investment and small scale trade. But for a while, a backlash has been growing among people in the Middle East against these expatriate workers due to their own economic decline. And I fear that our non-skilled labour force will soon be replaced by robots.”

Other than the labour force, Bangladesh is dependent on the Middle East in terms of fossil fuels. Additionally, it is only natural for Bangladesh to be really careful because there is an economic aspect of it. Mentioning the two oil refineries so far in Bangladesh to refine a particular type of crude oil that originates in the Middle East region, Lailufar Yasmin said, “This is a very important area, one where we need to have stronger relations with the Middle Eastern countries. So maintaining strategic relations with the Middle East is extremely important for Bangladesh.”

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Speaker Hytham Ghobashy Mahmud Hossain Opu/Dhaka Tribune

The region is sensitive and important for a number of critical issues, ranging from geo-strategic, geo-economic, geo-energy, and geo-ethnicity, said Maj Gen ANM Muniruzzaman.

“The Middle East has inherited a structure and a geographical identity from its colonial masters that sowed the seeds of discontent, instability and conflict, leaving behind questionable borders. But what is more important today is that there are a number of challenges facing the region, which makes it even more politically unstable at times and changes the power dynamics in the region”, he said.

Concluding the discussion, Dhaka Tribune Editor Zafar Sobhan said apart from economic gains, there is a whole spectrum of social inclusion of returned expatriates which is overlooked.

“As far as it goes for Bangladesh, it’s also important to look into the circumstances of how the millions of expatriate workers are changing the quality of our society when they return from those nations. There is not much study or data on this but surely there is an overall implication of this reintegration into our society,” he said.

The Middle East will continue to remain a crucial player in global politics due to the accumulated reserves of fossil fuel. However, the time of their being the centre of global affairs has shifted in the past decade, he added.

“The Middle East has been the centre of global affairs, including proxy wars, cold wars, and global sanctions. But for the past decade, that attention has shifted towards Asia,” noted the editor of Dhaka Tribune.

 

mb444

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BD needs to ensure steady supply of manpower export and cheap oil. We need to also try to export our goods.

As a region it is fairly close to us and we need to exploit the opportunies it provides.
 

Bossman

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UAE is a country of pimps even for Muslim women. Unfortunately BD women cannot avail that opportunity. They are too ugly.
 

bluesky

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UAE is a country of pimps even for Muslim women. Unfortunately BD women cannot avail that opportunity. They are too ugly.
Ugly or beautiful but what makes you think we want to sell our women like India does. Go to Hongkong to know about it.

Bloody ugliest are the Indian women but here you are pretending they are all Modhubala, Suraiya and Wahida Rahman of the Bollywood.

All belonging to your race are very ugly. Watch a movie scene in a swimming pool, your girls ‘ makeup is gone and their ugly face comes out on the camera.

Bloody idiot Malaun!!!
 
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Bilal9

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Ugly or beautiful but what makes you think we want to sell our women like India does. Go to Hongkong to know about it.

Bloody ugliest are the Indian women but here you are pretending they are all Modhubala, Suraiya and Wahida Rahman of the Bollywood.

All belonging to your race are very ugly. Watch a movie scene in a swimming pole your girls ‘ makeup is gone and their ugly face comes out on the camera.

Bloody idiot Malaun!!!

He is by most estimates a Pakistani. Lots of controversial posts and picks fights with everyone. :-)

@Foxtrot Alpha bhaisaab still no flag on this guy Bossman.
 

itsanufy

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Ugly or beautiful but what makes you think we want to sell our women like India does. Go to Hongkong to know about it.

Bloody ugliest are the Indian women but here you are pretending they are all Modhubala, Suraiya and Wahida Rahman of the Bollywood.

All belonging to your race are very ugly. Watch a movie scene in a swimming pole your girls ‘ makeup is gone and their ugly face comes out on the camera.

Bloody idiot Malaun!!!
Why unnecessarily you are bringing India here.
You are also getting too low now.
Do want stats on how many women are trafficked from BD?
What are their primary destinations, etc?
Even yesterday 5 trafficked women are caught with their handlers.
IMO this is the worst crime against humanity.
 

bluesky

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He is by most estimates a Pakistani. Lots of controversial posts and picks fights with everyone. :-)

@Foxtrot Alpha bhaisaab still no flag on this guy Bossman.
Yes, this @Bossman may not be an Indian. But, his attitudes are worse than Indians. He should tag himself as @Hanumanji which matches his characters. @Gomutra could be another possible identity.

This @Bossman must be fond of drinking his own urine in the early mornings and defecating here and there as his Indian relatives do in India.
 

mb444

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UAE is a country of pimps even for Muslim women. Unfortunately BD women cannot avail that opportunity. They are too ugly.
Awwwww... got rejected by a Bengali girl did you.... never mind perhaps go to the gym, not shit in the open, take a shower, use fair and lovely cream or whatever you people use and try again maybe?
 

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