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EXCLUSIVE: US assessing reported leak at Chinese nuclear power facility

Globenim

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Is China gonna dump radioactive water into the Pacific.?.
Its pretty transparent this is exactly what the U.S. regime propaganda mouthpiece is trying to project, to cover for their pawn Japan actually having a leak at its nuclear power plant.

Deep down in the article they have hidden a vague hint at what really happend according to a real source in case they are held responsible for spreading lies.

Framatome, an EDF affiliate and the builder of the reactors, said that there had been a “performance issue” but that the plant was operating within its safety parameters.
A leak or imminent leak is not a performance issue within safety parameters.

The entire story wrapped around it is just what the U.S. regime propaganda mouthpiece claims to "have seen" someone "claim" one a completely unrelated note from some anonymous source and speculation by some random pulled up nobody that has no relation to the project and clue whats going on, of course without any attempt at verifying the claims, because of course that could/would lead to the responsible parties to simply call it false.
 
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CAPRICORN-88

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Its pretty transparent this is exactly what the U.S. regime propaganda mouthpiece is trying to project, to cover for their pawn Japan actually having a leak at its nuclear power plant.

Deep down in the article they have hidden a vague hint at what really happend according to a real source in case they are held responsible for spreading lies.


A leak or imminent leak is not a performance issue within safety parameters.

The entire story wrapped around it is just what the U.S. regime propaganda mouthpiece claims to "have seen" someone "claim" one a completely unrelated note from some anonymous source and speculation by some random pulled up nobody that has no relation to the project and clue whats going on, of course without any attempt at verifying the claims, because of course that could/would lead to the responsible parties to simply call it false.
Now they badmouth each other as well.

 

Globenim

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The twin EPR reactors were designed and manufactured by Framatome of France.

It is well within the controls of both the joint Guangzhou and France owners and operator. Gas buildup is manageable.
The more serious consequence is when they shut down the plant for repairs and maintenance.

France is now worried abut the flaws in their design and specifications in their own nuclear plant and in other nations operating such similarly system.

What Framatome actually said without all the speculative and baseless U.S. propaganda BS around it.

"June 14, 2021 – Framatome is supporting resolution of a performance issue with the Taishan Nuclear Power Plant in Guangdong Province, China.

According to the data available, the plant is operating within the safety parameters.

Our team is working with relevant experts to assess the situation and propose solutions to address any potential issue."
 
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The US government has spent the past week assessing a report of a leak at a Chinese nuclear power plant, after a French company that part owns and helps operate it warned of an "imminent radiological threat," according to US officials and documents reviewed by CNN.
The warning included an accusation that the Chinese safety authority was raising the acceptable limits for radiation detection outside the Taishan Nuclear Power Plant in Guangdong province in order to avoid having to shut it down, according to a letter from the French company to the US Department of Energy obtained by CNN.
Despite the alarming notification from Framatome, the French company, the Biden administration believes the facility is not yet at a "crisis level," one of the sources said.


While US officials have deemed the situation does not currently pose a severe safety threat to workers at the plant or Chinese public, it is unusual that a foreign company would unilaterally reach out to the American government for help when its Chinese state-owned partner is yet to acknowledge a problem exists. The scenario could put the US in a complicated situation should the leak continue or become more severe without being fixed.


However, concern was significant enough that the National Security Council held multiple meetings last week as they monitored the situation, including two at the deputy level and another gathering at the assistant secretary level on Friday, which was led by NSC Senior Director for China Laura Rosenberger and Senior Director for Arms Control Mallory Stewart, according to US officials.
The Biden administration has discussed the situation with the French government and their own experts at the Department of Energy, sources said. The US has also been in contact with the Chinese government, US officials said, though the extent of that contact is unclear.


The US government declined to explain the assessment but officials at the NSC, State Department and the Department of Energy insisted that if there were any risk to the Chinese public, the US would be required to make it known under current treaties related to nuclear accidents.
Framatome had reached out to the US in order to obtain a waiver that would allow them to share American technical assistance in order to resolve the issue at the Chinese plant. There are only two reasons why this waiver would be granted, and one is an "imminent radiological threat," the same verbiage used in the June 8 memo.
The memo claims the Chinese limit was increased to exceed French standards, yet it remains unclear how that compares to US limits.
"It is not surprising that the French would reach out," according to Cheryl Rofer, a nuclear scientist who retired from Los Alamos National Laboratory in 2001. "In general, this sort of thing is not extraordinary, particularly if they think the country they are contacting has some special ability to help."
"But China likes to project that everything is just fine, all the time," she added.
The US could give permission for Framatome to provide the technical assistance or support to help resolve the issue, but it is the Chinese government's decision whether the incident requires shutting down the plant completely, the documents obtained by CNN indicate.
Ultimately, the June 8 request for assistance from Framatome is the only reason why the US became involved in the situation at all, multiple sources told CNN.
However, the Taishan Nuclear Power Plant published a statement on its website Sunday night local time, maintaining that environmental readings for both the plant and its surrounding area were "normal."
The two nuclear reactors in Taishan are both operational, the statement said, adding that Unit 2 had recently completed an "overhaul" and "successfully connected to the grid on June 10, 2021." The statement did not define why or how the plant was overhauled.
"Since it was put into commercial operation, the Taishan Nuclear Power Plant has strictly controlled the operation of the units in accordance with operating license documents and technical procedures. All operating indicators of the two units have met the requirements of nuclear safety regulations and power plant technical specifications," the statement noted.
In a separate statement Friday, hours after CNN first reached out for comment, Framatome acknowledged the company "is supporting resolution of a performance issue with the Taishan Nuclear Power Plant in Guangdong Province, China."
"According to the data available, the plant is operating within the safety parameters. Our team is working with relevant experts to assess the situation and propose solutions to address any potential issue," the statement added.
Framatome would not directly address the content of the letter to the Department of Energy when asked by CNN.
The letter comes as tensions between Beijing and Washington remain high and as G7 leaders met this weekend in the United Kingdom with China an important topic of discussion. There are no indications the reports of a leak were discussed at a high level at the summit.
French utility company Electrictie de France (EDF) said in a statement it has been informed of an increase concentration of "noble gases in the primary circuit" of reactor number one of the Taishan nuclear power plant.
EDF holds a 30% stake in the company with Chinese state energy company China General Nuclear Power Group in TNPJVC, which owns and operates the power plant in southern China.
EDF says "the presence of certain noble gases in the primary circuit is a known phenomenon, studied and provided for in the reactor operating procedures," but did not elaborate on gas levels.
Later on Monday, a spokesperson for EDF said the increased levels of radiation were caused by a "degradation of the housing of the fuel rods."
The spokesperson affirmed that the levels of radioactivity observed at the plant were below the threshold stipulated by the Chinese authorities, adding that the affected housings are the first of three containment barriers between the rods and the atmosphere.
The spokesperson noted that the risk of a potential leakage in the rod housing was first discussed following a planned refueling outage in October 2020 after initial measurements led to suspicions of a "lack of tightness" in the housings.
However, the spokesperson stressed that without a full analysis, it is too early to confirm whether a complete shutdown of the reactor is needed, adding that EDF currently has no information regarding the origin of the rod housing degradation.
CNN has reached out to the Chinese authorities in Beijing and Guangdong province, where the plant is located, and the Chinese embassy in Washington, DC. None have responded directly, though China is amidst a three-day national holiday that runs through the end of Monday.
A warning from a French nuclear company
The issue first emerged when Framatome, a French designer and supplier of nuclear equipment and services that was contracted to help construct and operate the Chinese-French plant, reached out to the US Department of Energy late last month informing them of a potential issue at the Chinese nuclear plant.
The company, mainly owned by EDF, the French utility company, then submitted an operational safety assistance request on June 3, formally asking for a waiver that would allow them to address an urgent safety matter, to the Department of Energy, warning American officials that the nuclear reactor is leaking fission gas.
The company followed up with DOE on June 8 asking for an expedited review of their request, according to a memo obtained by CNN.
"The situation is an imminent radiological threat to the site and to the public and Framatome urgently requests permission to transfer technical data and assistance as may be necessary to return the plant to normal operation," read the June 8 memo from the company's subject matter expert to the Energy Department.
Framatome reached out to the US government for assistance, the document indicates, because a Chinese government agency was continuing to increase its limits on the amount of gas that could safely be released from the facility without shutting it down, according to the documents reviewed by CNN.
When asked by CNN for comment, the Energy Department did not directly address the memo's claim that China was raising the limits.
In the June 8 memo, Framatome informed DOE the Chinese safety authority has continued to raise regulatory "off-site dose limits." It also says the company suspects that limit might be increased again as to keep the leaking reactor running despite safety concerns for the surrounding population.
"To ensure off-site dose limits are maintained within acceptable bounds to not cause undue harm to the surrounding population, TNPJVC (operator of Taishan-1) is required to comply with an regulatory limit and otherwise shut the reactor down if such a limit is exceeded," the June 8 memo reads.
It notes that this limit was established at a level consistent with what is dictated by the French safety authority, but "due to the increasing number of failures," China's safety authority, the National Nuclear Safety Administration (NNSA) has since revised the limit to more than double the initial release, "which in turn increases off-site risk to the public and on-site workers."
As of May 30, the Taishan reactor had reached 90% of the allegedly revised limit, the memo adds, noting concerns the plant operator may be "petitioning the NNSA to further increase the shutdown limit on an exigent basis in an effort to keep running which in turn would continue to increase the risk to the off-site population and the workers at the plant site."
The NNSA is China's nuclear safety regulatory authority. It oversees the implementation of safety standards at facilities like Taishan.
The US State Department came into possession of the June 8 letter and immediately began engaging with interagency partners and with the French government, State Department officials said.
Over the course of 48-72 hours, the US government has been in repeated contact with French officials and US technical experts at DOE, State Department officials said, noting that this flurry of activity was due to the June 8 letter.
Subsequently, there were several urgent questions for the French government and Framatome, they added. CNN has reached out to the French embassy in Washington for comment.
Still, Rofer, the retired nuclear scientist, warns that a gas leak could indicate bigger problems.
"If they do have a gas leak, that indicates some of their containment is broken," Rofer said. "It also argues that maybe some of the fuel elements could be broken, which would be a more serious problem."
"That would be a reason for shutting down the reactor and would then require the reactor to be refueled," Rofer told CNN, adding that removing the fuel elements must be done carefully.
For now, US officials do not think the leak is at "crisis level," but acknowledge it is increasing and bears monitoring, the source familiar with the situation told CNN.

While there is a chance the situation could become a disaster, US officials currently believe it is more likely that it will not become one, the source added.
China has expanded its use of nuclear energy in recent years, and it represents about 5% of all power generated in the country. According to China Nuclear Energy Association, there were 16 operational nuclear plants with 49 nuclear reactors in China as of March 2021, with the total generation capacity of 51,000 megawatts.
The Taishan plant is a prestige project built after China signed a nuclear electricity generation agreement with Électricité de France, which is mainly owned by the French government. The construction of the plant started in 2009, and the two units started generating electricity in 2018 and 2019, respectively.
The city of Taishan has a population of 950,000 and is situated in the southeast of the country in Guangdong province, which is home to 126 million residents and has a GDP of $1.6 trillion, comparable to that of Russia and South Korea.
CORRECTION: A previous version of this story incorrectly described the National Nuclear Safety Administration (NNSA). It is China's nuclear safety regulatory authority.

French Companies Admit Problems at Nuclear Plant in China


BEIJING — Unusual activity at a nuclear power reactor in China has drawn international attention, as two French companies involved in the plant acknowledged problems on Monday but said they could be handled safely.


The companies were responding to a report by CNN on Monday that Framatome, one of the companies, had sought help from the United States, citing an “imminent radiological threat” at the Taishan Nuclear Power Plant in Guangdong Province.

EDF, France’s main power utility and part owner of the power plant, said in a statement that certain gases had accumulated in the water and steam surrounding the uranium fuel rods at the heart of the reactor. But it said that the reactor had procedures for dealing with such a buildup of gases, which it described as a “known phenomenon.”

Framatome, an EDF affiliate and the builder of the reactors, said that there had been a “performance issue” but that the plant was operating within its safety parameters. In China, the power plant said in a statement on Sunday night that no leak into the environment had been detected.


The state-run China General Nuclear Power Group, better known as CGN, owns 70 percent of the Taishan plant, and EDF owns the rest. The French companies and the Chinese plant did not immediately respond to requests for interviews. China’s foreign ministry was closed on Monday for a national holiday. An officer answering the phones there said no one was available to comment on the Taishan nuclear power plant.

The plant has two nuclear reactors that were built to French designs on the coast of southeastern China. The reactors, one of which started commercial operation in 2018 and the other in 2019, are about 80 miles southwest of Hong Kong and 30 miles south of Taishan itself, a town of 500,000.

In its statement, EDF said it had called for a special meeting of the board of the joint venture that operates the power plant “to present all the data and the necessary decisions.”

Patrick H. Regan, a nuclear scientist at Britain’s National Physical Laboratory and at the University of Surrey, said that the difficulty described by EDF appeared to be a leak of gases from one or more fuel rods into the water and steam that surround the rods in the heart of a reactor. The most likely gas to have been detected is a radioactive isotope of xenon, he said.

The problem with that isotope is that its presence may prompt reactor operators to remove limits on how fast the reactor runs. That can make the reactor more vulnerable to overheating, Mr. Regan said.


Michael Friedlander, a former operator at three nuclear power plants in the U.S., said that many nuclear utilities around the world used to keep operating with leaking fuel rods and occasional venting of xenon gases. But that ended in the West in the 1990s as utilities sought to minimize even trace releases of radiation, partly to protect their own workers.

The global best practice is to shut down and change out the leaking fuel rods as soon as practical,” he said. “This normally would occur way, way, way before you approach a regulatory limit.”

It appeared that the reactor had released gas in the past. The Hong Kong government, which stays in close contact with the management of nearby reactors, had said on April 8 that there had been an incident three days earlier with the exhaust gas system at the same reactor. The incident resulted in a tiny release of a gas, but the details of which gas were not disclosed.

The release was only equal to 0.00044 percent of the annual limit for the power plant’s releases of that gas, however, the Hong Kong government said.









Have the americans found Iraq's WMD that can destroy Europe in 30 mins, yet?.............. :disagree:
 

lightoftruth

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Have the americans found Iraq's WMD that can destroy Europe in 30 mins, yet?.............. :disagree:
Maybe the Russians are in it too


And the french

 

striver44

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Taishan nuclear plant: China admits damage to fuel rods
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The Taishan nuclear power station under construction outside the city of Taishan in Guangdong province
IMAGE COPYRIGHTGETTY IMAGES
image captionChina's government denied there had been a radioactive leak at the facility in Guangdong province
The Chinese government has acknowledged damage to fuel rods at a nuclear power plant in the south of the country, but said no radioactivity had leaked.
China's Ministry of Ecology and Environment said the problem was "common" with no need for concern.
The admission comes after CNN reported that the US government was assessing a reported leak at the facility.
The French energy firm which helps operate the plant in Guangdong province earlier reported a "performance issue".
On Monday, a spokesperson for EDF said a problem with fuel rods had led to the build-up of gases, which had to be released into the atmosphere.
In its report, CNN said the company had warned the US government that China's nuclear regulator had raised limits on permissible levels of radiation outside the plant to avoid shutting it down.

But in a statement on Wednesday, China's environment ministry said this report was not true.
The statement - its first official confirmation of the incident - said while the regulator, the National Nuclear Safety Administration (NNSA), had reviewed the use of noble gases in a reactor, this had "nothing to do with the detection of radiation outside the nuclear plant".


Noble gases - also known as inert gases - are a group of stable chemical elements which have very low reactivity. They are often used in situations where scientists do not want chemical reactions, for instance in nuclear reactors or lighting.
Workers walk through the material supply yard at the Taishan plant
IMAGE COPYRIGHTGETTY IMAGES
image captionCNN reported that the US government was looking into reports of an incident at the plant
An increase in radiation levels was detected in Taishan's Unit 1 reactor, but this was within the parameters for safe operations, the ministry said.
The ministry said the increase was caused by damage to the cladding of a small number of fuel rods. Fuel rods are sealed metal tubes which hold nuclear materials used to fuel the nuclear reactor.
Of the 60,000 fuel rods in the reactor, the damaged ones accounted for "less than 0.01 percent", the ministry said.

Its statement said "fuel-rod damage during the operation of nuclear power plants is unavoidable" and "a common phenomenon".
The Taishan plant provides power for the Guangzhou and Shenzhen areas, both major manufacturing hubs.
China has dozens of nuclear plants and has invested billions of dollars to develop its atomic energy sector.

 

Beast

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Lol.. another story spinning. US shall be concern about it's aging nuclear power station.

China guarantees safety of Taishan Nuclear Power Plant
 

CAPRICORN-88

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Lol.. another story spinning. US shall be concern about it's aging nuclear power station.

China guarantees safety of Taishan Nuclear Power Plant
That's right.

:sarcastic: :sarcastic: :sarcastic:

Many of us will read this kind of tabloid stuff from CNN or BBC with a pinch of salt like the Collapse of the 3-Gorges Dam.
 

casual

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Those wishing for a fukashima meltdown will be sorely disappointed. Because of the design it's impossible for this plant to meltdown. The worst that can happen is losing the core. From the reports, that won't happen either.
 

Globenim

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USA: gets notification about technical issue at Chinese-French plant because of French involvement with the USA
USA : spreads lies and launders dishonest hyperbolic assumptions into facts via its propaganda network to distract from Fukishima wastewater dump
*US lies about the warning exposed as false*
*US lies about the actual issue exposed as false with report whats really going on*
USA nuclear watchdog: *microphone turned off* actually nothing really bad happend
USA media: See the lies were right! China admitted something! :blah:
USA shills: Wow thats embarassing for China :blah:
World: Why do Americans lie so much?
USA government: But we said so! *points at widely unplublished notitifaction*
USA media: But we said so! *points at sentence contradicting headline after two pages of nonsense*


Ironically we all know if this was in America and happend to a Chinese cobuilt plant the entire US media would be attacking China and Chinese fuel rods breaking instead of American engineering regardless of any facts and basis for the claims,
 
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Hamartia Antidote

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BEIJING — Unusual activity at a nuclear power reactor in China has drawn international attention, as two French companies involved in the plant acknowledged problems on Monday but said they could be handled safely.

The companies were responding to a report by CNN on Monday that Framatome, one of the companies, had sought help from the United States, citing an “imminent radiological threat” at the Taishan Nuclear Power Plant in Guangdong Province. EDF, France’s main power utility and part owner of the power plant, said in a statement that certain gases had accumulated in the water and steam surrounding the uranium fuel rods at the heart of the reactor. But it said that the reactor had procedures for dealing with such a buildup of gases, which it described as a “known phenomenon.”

Framatome, an EDF affiliate and the builder of the reactors, said that there had been a “performance issue” but that the plant was operating within its safety parameters. In China, the power plant said in a statement on Sunday night that no leak into the environment had been detected.

The state-run China General Nuclear Power Group, better known as CGN, owns 70 percent of the Taishan plant, and EDF owns the rest. The French companies and the Chinese plant did not immediately respond to requests for interviews. China’s Foreign Ministry was closed on Monday for a national holiday. An officer answering the phones there said no one was available to comment on the Taishan nuclear power plant.

The plant has two nuclear reactors that were built to French designs on the coast of southeastern China. The reactors, one of which started commercial operation in 2018 and the other in 2019, are about 80 miles southwest of Hong Kong and 30 miles south of Taishan itself, a town of 500,000.

In its statement, EDF said it had called for a special meeting of the board of the joint venture that operates the power plant “to present all the data and the necessary decisions.”

Patrick H. Regan, a nuclear scientist at Britain’s National Physical Laboratory and at the University of Surrey, said the difficulty described by EDF appeared to be a leak of gases from one or more fuel rods into the water and steam that surround the rods in the heart of a reactor. The most likely gas to have been detected is a radioactive isotope of xenon, he said.

The problem with that isotope is that its presence may prompt reactor operators to remove limits on how fast the reactor runs. That can make the reactor more vulnerable to overheating, Mr. Regan said.

“It’s almost pressing the accelerator” in a car, he said.
This is not a new problem in nuclear reactors, sometimes occurring if a fuel rod has a crack. It is typically handled by removing the fuel rods from the reactor and letting the xenon isotope gradually dissipate over a couple of days through radioactive decay.

The other option is to keep running the reactor and vent traces of the xenon gas from the reactor into the atmosphere. Regulators around the world give each reactor a small annual allowance of radioactive releases. Venting can allow the reactor to continue operating, but may trigger regulatory reviews.

Several details from the CNN report, which cited unnamed sources, could not be verified. CNN also reported that Framatome had said Chinese authorities raised the acceptable limits for radiation releases around the plant to avoid having to shut it down. The province is already suffering from electricity shortages.

Michael Friedlander, a former operator at three nuclear power plants in the United States, said many nuclear utilities around the world used to keep operating with leaking fuel rods and occasional venting of xenon gases. But that ended in the West in the 1990s as utilities sought to minimize even trace releases of radiation, partly to protect their own workers.

“The global best practice is to shut down and change out the leaking fuel rods as soon as practical,” he said. “This normally would occur way, way, way before you approach a regulatory limit.”

It appeared that the reactor had released gas in the past. The Hong Kong government, which stays in close contact with the management of nearby reactors, said on April 8 that there had been an incident three days earlier with the exhaust gas system at the same reactor. The incident resulted in a tiny release of a gas, but the details of which gas were not disclosed.

The release was equal to only 0.00044 percent of the annual limit for the power plant’s releases of that gas, however, the Hong Kong government said.
According to CNN, Framatome had contacted the U.S. government about getting help with operations at the power plant. CGN, the Chinese nuclear company, is on the U.S. Commerce Department’s so-called Entity List of foreign enterprises with which American companies are forbidden to do business.

As part of the request for advice, Framatome asked the United States to waive its limits on nuclear assistance to China on the basis that it met a legal test of an “immediate radiological threat,” the report said. The United States has a lot of early experience in managing the trade-offs of venting traces of gases from reactors and continuing to run them.

It’s unclear how the company defined the threat. Some of the most sensitive radiation detection equipment tends to be at nuclear power plants, so as to provide early warning of any leaks. CLP, a Hong Kong-based electricity multinational that partly owns a nuclear power station in Shenzhen, near Hong Kong, said on Monday in an emailed response to questions that it had not observed any abnormal radiation.

The American Embassy in Beijing had no immediate comment.
 

Hamartia Antidote

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USA: gets notification about technical issue at Chinese-French plant because of French involvement with the USA
USA : spreads lies and launders dishonest hyperbolic assumptions into facts via its propaganda network to distract from Fukishima wastewater dump
*US lies about the warning exposed as false*
*US lies about the actual issue exposed as false with report whats really going on*
USA nuclear watchdog: *microphone turned off* actually nothing really bad happend
USA media: See the lies were right! China admitted something! :blah:
USA shills: Wow thats embarassing for China :blah:
World: Why do Americans lie so much?
USA government: But we said so! *points at widely unplublished notitifaction*
USA media: But we said so! *points at sentence contradicting headline after two pages of nonsense*


Ironically we all know if this was in America and happend to a Chinese cobuilt plant the entire US media would be attacking China and Chinese fuel rods breaking instead of American engineering regardless of any facts and basis for the claims,
LOL! A Chinese member doesn't read the story.

1) The French alerted the US that China keeps increasing the "safety margin" of radiation detection so they don't have to declare an incident. That's it.

2) Chinese PDF members immediately rant and rave about the US "spreading lies".

:omghaha:
 

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