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Dutch mechanized brigade to be integrated into German panzer division

Zarvan

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Germany and the Netherlands are to form a join armoured unit. Source: Bundeswehr
The Royal Netherlands Army's 43 Mechanized Brigade will be integrated into the Bundeswehr's 1st Panzer Division, German Defence Minister Ursula von der Leyen and her Dutch counterpart, Jeanine Hennis-Plasschaert, told their respective parliaments on 15 September.

A formal agreement to this effect will be signed later this year, with integration work starting at the end of the year or beginning of 2016, and the unit becoming operational at the end of 2019.

Before it is integrated into the 1st Panzer Division, 43 Mechanized Brigade will be reinforced by German 414 Panzer Battalion, which will include a Dutch Leopard 2A6 tank company with 100 personnel based in Bergen-Hohne, Germany. The remainder of 43 Mechanized Brigade will stay in the Netherlands.

To ensure commonality, Germany will upgrade the Netherlands' 16 remaining Leopard 2A6 tanks to A7 standard and pool them with its own Leopard 2 tanks. The Netherlands will lease the tanks necessary to form a company of 18 Leopard 2s.

The Dutch army's 11 Airmobile Brigade is already integrated into the German Division Schnelle Kräfte rapid deployment force.

Hennis-Plasschaert described the planned integrated division as, "another groundbreaking step in Dutch-German co-operation ... which will greatly improve European operational capabilities."

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Dutch mechanized brigade to be integrated into German panzer division - IHS Jane's 360
 

Oublious

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Netherland have cut a lot of budget on defence. Ther is no Tanks more in ther inventory:-). The Dutch have a cheap doctrine unfortunately.
 

Indus Pakistan

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Germany and the Netherlands are to form a join armoured unit. Source: Bundeswehr
The Royal Netherlands Army's 43 Mechanized Brigade will be integrated into the Bundeswehr's 1st Panzer Division, German Defence Minister Ursula von der Leyen and her Dutch counterpart, Jeanine Hennis-Plasschaert, told their respective parliaments on 15 September.

A formal agreement to this effect will be signed later this year, with integration work starting at the end of the year or beginning of 2016, and the unit becoming operational at the end of 2019.

Before it is integrated into the 1st Panzer Division, 43 Mechanized Brigade will be reinforced by German 414 Panzer Battalion, which will include a Dutch Leopard 2A6 tank company with 100 personnel based in Bergen-Hohne, Germany. The remainder of 43 Mechanized Brigade will stay in the Netherlands.

To ensure commonality, Germany will upgrade the Netherlands' 16 remaining Leopard 2A6 tanks to A7 standard and pool them with its own Leopard 2 tanks. The Netherlands will lease the tanks necessary to form a company of 18 Leopard 2s.

The Dutch army's 11 Airmobile Brigade is already integrated into the German Division Schnelle Kräfte rapid deployment force.

Hennis-Plasschaert described the planned integrated division as, "another groundbreaking step in Dutch-German co-operation ... which will greatly improve European operational capabilities."

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(221 of 294 words)

Dutch mechanized brigade to be integrated into German panzer division - IHS Jane's 360
These countries fought and destroyed each other for over 5 years of war. They killed 10s of millions of each other. They bombed, shot, stabbed and cut each other until they bled to death. Look at them today united.

I hope I live to see the day when a Armoured Division is made up of tank regiment from Pakistan, mechanized regiment from Iran and Infantry regiment from Afghanistan.

Ps. On a side note I think the Leopard Tank is the best looking tank in the world that German Bundeswehr insignia - the black and white cross is wicked.
 

Penguin

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The Dutch have fought with the Germans more than 70 years ago.
Gee, no kidding? And your point is?

An estimated 325,000 to 500,000 non-ethnic German volunteers and conscripts served in the Waffen-SS. The Waffen-SS saw action throughout World War II and grew from three regiments to a force of 38 divisions (plus two ad hoc divisions = 40). In 1940, Hitler gave permission for the first non-German Waffen-SS formation and by the end of the war, twenty five of the thirty eight Waffen-SS division were formed from foreign volunteers or conscripts, or around 60% of Waffen-SS members were non-German.

Ostlegionen (literally "Eastern Legions") or Osttruppen ("Eastern Troops") were conscripts and volunteers from the occupied eastern territories. A total of 98 battalions were raised with 80 serving on the Eastern Front and in the Balkans. 12 were later transferred to France and Italy in 1943. For the Heer (not SS), on the Eastern Front the volunteers and conscripts in the Ostlegionen came to comprise a fighting force equivalent to 30 German divisions by the end of 1943.

Countries which had European Freiwillige in the German forces
  • Albania
  • Bulgaria
  • Croatia
  • Denmark
  • Estonia
  • Finland
  • France
  • Georgia
  • Hungary
  • India
  • Ireland
  • Italy
  • Latvia
  • Liechtenstein
  • Lithuania
  • Luxembourg
  • Netherlands
  • Belgium (Flemish and Walloons)
  • Norway
  • Portugal
  • Romania
  • Slovakia
  • Slovenia
  • Soviet Union
  • Spain
  • Sweden
  • Switzerland
  • Ukraine
  • United Kingdom
  • United States
Some sources say between 20,000 and 25,000 Dutchmen volunteered to serve in the Heer and the Waffen-SS, others mention between 45000 and 55000 in the Waffen-SS alone.

Foreign civilian forced labourers in Nazi Germany, January 1944, totalled 6,450,000 of which 2,1,55,000 from Western Europe 33%) and of those 350,000 Dutch (5,4%) . Those were slaves essentially....

With the occupation of the Netherlands, by no means all was lost.
  • The colonies (most notably the Dutch East Indies) were still free, and Queen Wilhelmina and the Dutch government had left the Netherlands for London.
  • The Royal Netherlands Navy [nb: at that time the 7th largest in the world] had managed to get most of its ships to England (one, the light cruiser Jacob van Heemskerk was not finished yet and had to be towed). Also, the Netherlands had a large merchant marine, which would contribute greatly to the Allied war effort during the rest of the war.
  • A few Dutch pilots also had escaped and joined the RAF to fight in the Battle of Britain. In July 1940, two all-Dutch squadrons were formed with personnel and Fokker seaplanes from the Dutch naval air force: 320 Squadron and 321 Squadron (which afterwards moved to Ceylon). The Royal Netherlands Military Flying School was re-established at Hawkins Field, Jackson, Mississippi. In 1943, an all-Dutch fighter squadron was formed in the UK, 322 Squadron.
  • In 1942, an all-Dutch brigade was formed, the Princess Irene Brigade. This brigade would go on to participate in Operation Overlord in 1944.
  • Inside the Netherlands, both passive and active resistance was widespread throughout the country, with the first Dutch Resistance organisation, the Communist Party of the Netherlands, holding their first meeting the day after the Dutch capitulation.
  • The Allied Special Forces also recruited and trained a number of Dutch officers for Operation Jedburgh teams and for the Anglo Dutch Country Section of Force 136.


Salute to nazi germans and neds of waffen ss
I hope they all died an rotted in hell. Not too fond of those who like or admire them either...
 
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Indus Pakistan

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@Penguin

Yes, your right there. I also am not too fond of them for obvious reasons. The Germans even recruited Muslim Albanians and Bosnians into SS division.

21st Waffen Mountain Division of the SS Skanderbeg - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Muslim members of the Waffen-SS 13th division at prayer during their training in Germany, 1943
By RHP | Posted on: October 4, 2014 | Updated on: October 4, 2014
19 Comments

Members of the division at prayer during their training at Neuhammer in November 1943.

The photo is taken during the division training at Neuhammer. The romantic notions that Himmler had about the Bosnian Muslims were probably significant in the division’s genesis. He was personally fascinated by the Islamic faith and believed that Islam created fearless soldiers. He envisioned the creation of a Bosnian SS division constituted solely of Bosnian Muslims in a manner similar to the Bosnian divisions of the old Austro-Hungarian Empire.

Many of these soldiers came from Bosnia, and it was a conscious decision to fight the Communist Partisans and the nationalist Chetniks. The Nazis tried to cater to the Muslim religious needs of their recruits, but the soldiers themselves cared more about protecting their homeland (as promised by the Nazis), than anything else the SS and Himmler told them about racial equality/superiority to the inferior Jews. Riots and desertions were commonplace among the soldiers, often to the Communist Partisans led by Josip Broz Tito, who promised the soldiers amnesty if they joined the Partisans. The soldiers were only interested in protecting their homeland in Bosnia, so any incursions into Croatia or Serbia to help the Nazi allies or war effort there met with consternation among the soldiers, and even more desertions.

The 13th Waffen Mountain Division of the SS Handschar was a Muslim combat formation created by the Germans to restore order in Yugoslavia. It was given the title Handschar after a local fighting knife or sword carried by Turkish policemen during the centuries that the region was part of the Ottoman Empire. It was the first non-Germanic Waffen-SS division, and its formation marked the expansion of the Waffen-SS into a multi-ethnic military force. The division was composed mostly of Bosnian Muslims (ethnic Bosniaks) with some Catholic Croat soldiers and mostly German and Yugoslav Volksdeutsche (ethnic German) officers.

The division was initially sent to southern France for formation and training. On the night of 16/17 September 1943, while the 13th SS Division was training in France, a group of pro-Partisan soldiers led by Muslim and Catholic junior officers staged a mutiny. They captured most of the German personnel and executed five German officers. The mutineers believed that many of the enlisted men would join them and they could reach the western Allies. Soon the revolt was put down and as a result the division was moved to the Neuhammer training grounds in the Silesian region of Germany (present-day Poland) to complete its training. During the training phase, the German officers, pleased with its progress, coined the term Mujo for the Bosnian Muslims. The members of the division swore an oath of allegiance to both Adolf Hitler and Pavelić (Croatian leader).

The division fought briefly in the Syrmia region north of the Sava river prior to crossing into northeastern Bosnia. After crossing the Sava, it established a designated “security zone” in northeastern Bosnia between the Sava, Bosna, Drina and Spreča rivers. In late 1944, parts of the division were transferred briefly to the Zagreb area, after which the non-German members began to desert in large numbers. Over the winter of 1944–1945, it was sent to the Baranja region where it fought against the Red Army and Bulgarians throughout southern Hungary, falling back via a series of defensive lines until they were inside the Reich frontier. Most of the remaining Bosnian Muslims left at this point and attempted to return to Bosnia. The rest retreated further west, hoping to surrender to the western Allies.

Interesting facts:

  • Five men from the Waffen-SS 13th division received the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross.
  • One of the paradoxical aspects of Hitler’s elite Waffen-SS was that more than half of the estimated 900,000 men that served in its units were not full-blooded Germans. The first divisions of the Waffen-SS were essentially purely German in manpower, but starting with the 5th SS Panzer Division Wiking the Germans began to draw on foreign volunteers from occupied countries. Initially, only Nordic volunteers were accepted, but as the war progressed, and manpower shortages became more acute, the Germans began to broaden their definition of “acceptable races” to encompass just about every race except Africans and Jews.
Also the Germans recruited men from captured troops from the undivided British India. Many soldiers from what is now Pakistan ended up bizzarely fighting for the Nazis. How and what led them to do this is beyond me.


 
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Gee, no kidding? And your point is?

An estimated 325,000 to 500,000 non-ethnic German volunteers and conscripts served in the Waffen-SS. The Waffen-SS saw action throughout World War II and grew from three regiments to a force of 38 divisions (plus two ad hoc divisions = 40). In 1940, Hitler gave permission for the first non-German Waffen-SS formation and by the end of the war, twenty five of the thirty eight Waffen-SS division were formed from foreign volunteers or conscripts, or around 60% of Waffen-SS members were non-German.

Ostlegionen (literally "Eastern Legions") or Osttruppen ("Eastern Troops") were conscripts and volunteers from the occupied eastern territories. A total of 98 battalions were raised with 80 serving on the Eastern Front and in the Balkans. 12 were later transferred to France and Italy in 1943. For the Heer (not SS), on the Eastern Front the volunteers and conscripts in the Ostlegionen came to comprise a fighting force equivalent to 30 German divisions by the end of 1943.

Countries which had European Freiwillige in the German forces
  • Albania
  • Bulgaria
  • Croatia
  • Denmark
  • Estonia
  • Finland
  • France
  • Georgia
  • Hungary
  • India
  • Ireland
  • Italy
  • Latvia
  • Liechtenstein
  • Lithuania
  • Luxembourg
  • Netherlands
  • Belgium (Flemish and Walloons)
  • Norway
  • Portugal
  • Romania
  • Slovakia
  • Slovenia
  • Soviet Union
  • Spain
  • Sweden
  • Switzerland
  • Ukraine
  • United Kingdom
  • United States
Some sources say between 20,000 and 25,000 Dutchmen volunteered to serve in the Heer and the Waffen-SS, others mention between 45000 and 55000 in the Waffen-SS alone.

Foreign civilian forced labourers in Nazi Germany, January 1944, totalled 6,450,000 of which 2,1,55,000 from Western Europe 33%) and of those 350,000 Dutch (5,4%) . Those were slaves essentially....

With the occupation of the Netherlands, by no means all was lost.
  • The colonies (most notably the Dutch East Indies) were still free, and Queen Wilhelmina and the Dutch government had left the Netherlands for London.
  • The Royal Netherlands Navy [nb: at that time the 7th largest in the world] had managed to get most of its ships to England (one, the light cruiser Jacob van Heemskerk was not finished yet and had to be towed). Also, the Netherlands had a large merchant marine, which would contribute greatly to the Allied war effort during the rest of the war.
  • A few Dutch pilots also had escaped and joined the RAF to fight in the Battle of Britain. In July 1940, two all-Dutch squadrons were formed with personnel and Fokker seaplanes from the Dutch naval air force: 320 Squadron and 321 Squadron (which afterwards moved to Ceylon). The Royal Netherlands Military Flying School was re-established at Hawkins Field, Jackson, Mississippi. In 1943, an all-Dutch fighter squadron was formed in the UK, 322 Squadron.
  • In 1942, an all-Dutch brigade was formed, the Princess Irene Brigade. This brigade would go on to participate in Operation Overlord in 1944.
  • Inside the Netherlands, both passive and active resistance was widespread throughout the country, with the first Dutch Resistance organisation, the Communist Party of the Netherlands, holding their first meeting the day after the Dutch capitulation.
  • The Allied Special Forces also recruited and trained a number of Dutch officers for Operation Jedburgh teams and for the Anglo Dutch Country Section of Force 136.



I hope they all died an rotted in hell. Not too fond of those who like or admire them either...
Relax. I was just showing that they can collaborate. NATO armies have had mixed components as well.
My point is that THIS IS NOTHING NEW. :)

And I absolutely despise the Nazi ideology tbh. :D So again, relax.
 

Penguin

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Relax. I was just showing that they can collaborate. NATO armies have had mixed components as well.
My point is that THIS IS NOTHING NEW. :)

And I absolutely despise the Nazi ideology tbh. :D So again, relax.
I very much doubt that explanation. To make your point you could just as well have pointed to the Dutch serving in the RAF in WW2, for example since the Brits are also NATO. Even today, there is very close cooperation between RN and RNthN and thei respective marine corps. However you chose not to do so. Which I do not believe to be a coincidence.

Besides, a better example involving Germans and Dutch would have been 1(GE/NL) Army Corps, a multinational formation consisting of units from both the Royal Dutch Army and German Army that became active in 1995 and remains active to the present. In 1991 the defence ministers of The Netherlands and Germany decided to establish a binational unit to replace one German and one Dutch corps. In 1993 a treaty between the two countries was signed which resulted in two previously independent corps being amalgamated to form 1 German/Netherlands Corps or 1 (GE/NL) Corps consisting of one German and one Dutch division. The corps' readiness for action was achieved on August 30, 1995. The corps headquarters also takes part in NATO Response Force readiness rotations. The Corps' headquarters are situated in Münster (Westphalia), formerly the headquarters of the German Army's I. Corps out of which 1 German/Netherlands Corps evolved. The corps has national and multinational operational responsibilities, and its commanding officer is the only one in Europe to have OPCON in peacetime.

See I. German/Dutch Corps - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
and 1 (German/Netherlands) Corps | Royal Netherlands Army | Defensie.nl
 
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I very much doubt that explanation. To make your point you could just as well have pointed to the Dutch serving in the RAF in WW2, for example since the Brits are also NATO. Even today, there is very close cooperation between RN and RNthN and thei respective marine corps. However you chose not to do so. Which I do not believe to be a coincidence.
That was the most prominent yet powerful collaboration between Germany and Nederland. There is nothing to be apologetic about it. :)
 

Super Falcon

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Gee, no kidding? And your point is?

An estimated 325,000 to 500,000 non-ethnic German volunteers and conscripts served in the Waffen-SS. The Waffen-SS saw action throughout World War II and grew from three regiments to a force of 38 divisions (plus two ad hoc divisions = 40). In 1940, Hitler gave permission for the first non-German Waffen-SS formation and by the end of the war, twenty five of the thirty eight Waffen-SS division were formed from foreign volunteers or conscripts, or around 60% of Waffen-SS members were non-German.

Ostlegionen (literally "Eastern Legions") or Osttruppen ("Eastern Troops") were conscripts and volunteers from the occupied eastern territories. A total of 98 battalions were raised with 80 serving on the Eastern Front and in the Balkans. 12 were later transferred to France and Italy in 1943. For the Heer (not SS), on the Eastern Front the volunteers and conscripts in the Ostlegionen came to comprise a fighting force equivalent to 30 German divisions by the end of 1943.

Countries which had European Freiwillige in the German forces
  • Albania
  • Bulgaria
  • Croatia
  • Denmark
  • Estonia
  • Finland
  • France
  • Georgia
  • Hungary
  • India
  • Ireland
  • Italy
  • Latvia
  • Liechtenstein
  • Lithuania
  • Luxembourg
  • Netherlands
  • Belgium (Flemish and Walloons)
  • Norway
  • Portugal
  • Romania
  • Slovakia
  • Slovenia
  • Soviet Union
  • Spain
  • Sweden
  • Switzerland
  • Ukraine
  • United Kingdom
  • United States
Some sources say between 20,000 and 25,000 Dutchmen volunteered to serve in the Heer and the Waffen-SS, others mention between 45000 and 55000 in the Waffen-SS alone.

Foreign civilian forced labourers in Nazi Germany, January 1944, totalled 6,450,000 of which 2,1,55,000 from Western Europe 33%) and of those 350,000 Dutch (5,4%) . Those were slaves essentially....

With the occupation of the Netherlands, by no means all was lost.
  • The colonies (most notably the Dutch East Indies) were still free, and Queen Wilhelmina and the Dutch government had left the Netherlands for London.
  • The Royal Netherlands Navy [nb: at that time the 7th largest in the world] had managed to get most of its ships to England (one, the light cruiser Jacob van Heemskerk was not finished yet and had to be towed). Also, the Netherlands had a large merchant marine, which would contribute greatly to the Allied war effort during the rest of the war.
  • A few Dutch pilots also had escaped and joined the RAF to fight in the Battle of Britain. In July 1940, two all-Dutch squadrons were formed with personnel and Fokker seaplanes from the Dutch naval air force: 320 Squadron and 321 Squadron (which afterwards moved to Ceylon). The Royal Netherlands Military Flying School was re-established at Hawkins Field, Jackson, Mississippi. In 1943, an all-Dutch fighter squadron was formed in the UK, 322 Squadron.
  • In 1942, an all-Dutch brigade was formed, the Princess Irene Brigade. This brigade would go on to participate in Operation Overlord in 1944.
  • Inside the Netherlands, both passive and active resistance was widespread throughout the country, with the first Dutch Resistance organisation, the Communist Party of the Netherlands, holding their first meeting the day after the Dutch capitulation.
  • The Allied Special Forces also recruited and trained a number of Dutch officers for Operation Jedburgh teams and for the Anglo Dutch Country Section of Force 136.



I hope they all died an rotted in hell. Not too fond of those who like or admire them either...
What they gave us in return u cant imagine from subs to rocket they changed dynamics of world and what they did with jew was right
 

Penguin

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What they gave us in return u cant imagine from subs to rocket they changed dynamics of world and what they did with jew was right
Cheer on. They (the nazi's), given their racial ideology, surely would have exterminated you if given half a chance....
The Aryan Master Race conceived by the Nazis graded humans on a scale of pure Aryan to non-Aryan (who were viewed as subhumans). At the top of the scale of pure Aryans included Germans and other Germanic peoples including the Dutch, Scandinavians, and the English, as well as other peoples such as the Italians and the French who were said to have a suitable admixture of Germanic blood.
...
At the bottom of the racial scale of non-Aryans were Jews, Slavic people, Romani, and blacks
...
The Nazis considered [e.g.] the Slavs as Non-Aryan Untermenschen ("sub-humans") who were to be targeted for eventual extermination
...
In Asia, only the Indo-Aryan and Indo-Iranian populations of British India and Iran were considered by numerous Nazi anthropologists to be Aryan
...
About 10,000 Japanese nationals (mostly diplomats and military officials) residing in Nazi Germany were given status of "Honorary Aryan" which allowed them to have more privileges than any other "non-Aryans".
Racial policy of Nazi Germany - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

It simply is NOT correct that rockets, jets, subs etc. were unique or solely German developments, or that advances in these field would have not occurred in the absense of Nazi Germany. .
  • Jets: Frank Whittle, Gloster E.28/39 in 1941.
  • Frank Halford > de Havilland Goblin, originally the Halford H-1, early turbojet engine > 1942 > Gloster Meteor 1943 > De Havilland Vampire 1943 > Lockheed P-80 Shooting Star 1944.
  • Schnorkel (sub breather) > Dutch invention adopted by Germans
  • Naval AAA gun fire radar > prewar Dutch : Hollandse Signaal Apparaten > US 40 mm AAA control during WW2
  • The modern solid- and liquid-fueled engines became realities early in the 20th century, thanks to the American physicist Robert Goddard.
 
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