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Diary of a Turkish Soldier in Korean War

Discussion in 'Turkish Defence Forum' started by Sinan out, Mar 13, 2013.

  1. Sinan out

    Sinan out ELITE MEMBER

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    My grandfather was a soldier and been in Korean war. In the war, my grandfather wrote daily to his dairy. I have seen a remarkable memory while looking at the dairy:

    "14 Haziran 1951 Perşembe
    Bu sabah jiple yine ileri gittik. Muhittin 19 kişilik takımı ile 507 rakımlı tepeyi Bir bölükten fazla düşman kuvvetinin elinden aldı. Düşman zayiatı 128 ölü 9 esirdi. Bizim ise bir şehit 4 yaralı. Bugün Muhittin Tugayda nam aldı. "

    "14 June 1951 Thursday
    This morning we went to forward with the jeep again. Muhittin took the hill 507 with his 19 people team from the enemy company . Enemy casualties were 128 dead, 9 captive. While we had one martyr and four wounded. Today, he gained reputation throughout the brigade."

    I hope someone have knowledge about this operation because i wish to learn more.

    Grandfather's pictures:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
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  2. Neptune

    Neptune SENIOR MEMBER

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    The Turkish Brigade (code name
    North Star, Turkish: Şimal
    Yıldızı[3] or Kutup Yıldızı[4]) was
    a Turkish Army Infantry Brigade
    that served under United Nations
    command during the Korean War
    between 1950 to 1953. Attached
    to the U.S. 25th Infantry Division
    the Turkish Brigade fought in
    several actions, and was
    awarded Unit Citations from
    Korea and the United States after
    fighting in the Kunuri Battle.

    Turkish Brigade - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Battle of the Hook - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Battle of Wawon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
     
  3. Sinan out

    Sinan out ELITE MEMBER

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    Guys, i wanted to bump this thread as it has been over a year now and we have many new posters whom may have knowledge.

    I searched the net about this specific event but couldn't find any answers for some time now.

    What we know is;

    Battle occured 14 June 1951 Thursday, in the hill 507 in Korea. Muhittin (squad commander i guess) captured hill while killing 128 enemy soldiers and captivating 9 of them with his 19 manned squad.

    This is a extraordinary feat.... does anyone have info ???
     
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  4. Hakan

    Hakan RETIRED MOD

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    An American Korean War veteran told my dad that the chinese were always scared of attacking the turks so instead they would always try to attack the americans. He also said that the turks would put the heads of the chinese soldiers on sticks and put them around to scare the chinese. He said that the Turks were amazing soldiers and very disciplined.
     
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  5. u.MP

    u.MP FULL MEMBER

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    To Honor Our Fallen

    "Sgt. John J. Bain, 13311175, 25th Infantry Division, 89th Medium Tank Battalion, Company D.. Killed in Action on 14 June 1951 near Hill 507 on Line Wyoming, Poyngang, North Korea. Born on 20 November 1930, he entered the service on 31 January 1949 from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
    Sgt. Bain was the crew member of a M4 Sherman tank in Company D, 89th Medium Tank Battalion. The tank was commanded by SFC Willie Royal. The Battalion was assigned to the 25th Infantry Division and was supporting the Turkish Brigade in an attack on Hill 507 from the north and east sides. While maneuvering for a better position to support the Turkish assault, three tanks were hit by 57mm anti-tank gun fire, with Sgt. Bain's tank being completely destroyed. Four of the five crewmen were killed."

    All I could find.

    also;
    25th Infantry Division (United States) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Quick search on 25th Infantry Division in Korean War:
    "Success continued with Operation Dauntless, Detonate and Piledriver in the Spring of 1951."
     
  6. Hakan

    Hakan RETIRED MOD

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    Its really worth reading

    The greatest number of North Korea's prisoners was, of course, American. Of the twelve nations represented, however, the third most numerous were the Turks, with 229. The U.S. Army study found them to have been just as exemplary in prison as they were in battle. The Turks' secret weapons were discipline, great pride in their brigade, and an unbroken chain of command. The final official report contains this Turkish officer's account of his prison experience:

    "I told the Chinese commander of the camp that I was in charge of my group. If he wanted anything done, he was to come to me, and I would see that it was done. If he removed me, the responsibility would fall not on him but on the man next below me, and after that on the man below him. And so on, down thru the ranks, until there were only two privates left. Then the senior private would be in charge. They could kill us, I told him, but they couldn't make us do what we didn't want to do. Discipline was our salvation, and we all knew it. If a Turk had questioned an order from his superior to share his food or lift a [stretcher], the way I understand some of your men did, he would literally have had his teeth knocked in. Not by his superior, either, but by the Turk nearest to him. The Communists made attempts to indoctrinate [us]. . .but they failed completely, and eventually gave up."

    The crowning consequence of this discipline was that, although half of the 229 were wounded when captured, not one died in prison. When a Turk got sick, the rest nursed him to health. If he was ordered to the hospital, two well Turks went along to minister to him hand and foot and to carry him back to the compound when he was discharged. At mealtime two Turks were dispatched to carry the food back, and it was divided equally down to the last morsel. There was no hogging, no rule of dog eat dog, not ever. Death by "give-up-itis" was impossible. While an American might curl up alone at night and die in the bitter cold, the Turks all piled together in one corner of their cell, and every hour the two on the outside would rotate to the center of the pile. The Chinese guards actually grew to fear their Turkish prisoners, as they watched the interminable wrestling matches which kept them so tough - and, paradoxically, so loyal to one another. As a consequence of this study President Eisenhower issued the now-famous Uniform Code of Military Conduct, and the Korean experience, thank God, has not repeated itself.


    Turks from an eye of an American soldier in Korea
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2014
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  7. olcayto

    olcayto FULL MEMBER

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    Here's a US fallen soldier at hill 507 the same day.

    Sgt. John J. Bain, 13311175, 25th Infantry Division, 89th Medium Tank Battalion, Company D.. Killed in Action on 14 June 1951 near Hill 507 on Line Wyoming, Poyngang, North Korea. Born on 20 November 1930, he entered the service on 31 January 1949 from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
    Sgt. Bain was the crew member of a M4 Sherman tank in Company D, 89th Medium Tank Battalion. The tank was commanded by SFC Willie Royal. The Battalion was assigned to the 25th Infantry Division and was supporting the Turkish Brigade in an attack on Hill 507 from the north and east sides. While maneuvering for a better position to support the Turkish assault, three tanks were hit by 57mm anti-tank gun fire, with Sgt. Bain's tank being completely destroyed. Four of the five crewmen were killed.

    He is buried at Holy Cross Cemetery, Yeadon, Pennsylvania. He was survived by his wife, whom he married the day before he shipped out to Korea, and his parents. He was 20 years old.
     
  8. TurAr

    TurAr SENIOR MEMBER

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    @Sinan Can you share more mate? I would like to read more of his memories if it is possible.
     
  9. Chinese-Dragon

    Chinese-Dragon PDF THINK TANK: ANALYST

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    Great and informative thread. :cheers:

    That sounds horrific?
     
  10. TurAr

    TurAr SENIOR MEMBER

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    There are lots of myths about the Korean War. It is probably just a BS like many others.
     
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  11. Sinan out

    Sinan out ELITE MEMBER

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    A few year ago, me and my father sit down and write his diary in microsoft word. A total of 75 pages.

    His diary starts from 1 january 1950 and ends in 24 December 1951. Turkey -> Korea -> Back to Turkey.

    As he was a medic there are not many action in his diaries, most of them are like " I woke up today, weather is very cold, we did nothing till noon, we eat dinner and slept." Just occasionally he tells about war related stuff... and there are lots of private affairs of him. So if you want to learn a specific date, i can share.. but i don't want to share all of his diaries.

    While he was alive (I was at the age of six when he passed away.) He never showed his diaries to anyone including his children.

    My father says, my granddad never told any war stories about Korea to anyone. He couldn't watch any war films as he lost many of his friends in his arms, my dad tells me.

    Also dad says, only 3 times in his life, he told stories about war to my father with the unending insists of him. Granddad ended telling the stories when he comes into a state that he couldn't talk anymore. He than left the room, made a coffee to himself and smoke a cigarette than go to sleep and be in a foul mood for days.

    Edit:

    While going through his diaries, i noticed how the war transformed his personality.

    Before going to war, he was very lively and social person. After coming from Korea... he had became grim and quiet person.

    Also these are sad entries which shows, how war effected his personality. He came back to his home town in 17 August 1951



    26 Ağustos 1951 Pazar

    Bu sabah erken kalktım. Parka kadar gidip geldim. ***** geldi. Konuştuk evde kağıt oynadık. Babam biraz hasta ve evde yatıyor. Çok canım sıkılıyor, adeta ağlamalık oluyorum. Akşam yine parka kadar gittim ve ******’la sinemada Harman sonu filmini seyrettik. Gelerek yattım. Allahtan hayırlısı.


    24 Eylül 1951 Pazartesi

    Bugün yine erken erken kalktık. ********* evvela babama sonra bana sütlü kahve pişirdi. Kalktım, bermutat kahvaltımı ettim ve sokağa fırladım. Bugün Bolvadin kurtuluş günü yıldönümü ve aynı zaman da panayır günü. Kurtuluş bayramını seyrettim. Milli kıyafetlerle bir müfreze süvari kuvveti Hükümetin önüne geldi. Başlarında Misakı Milliye subayı kıyafetiyle Muallim A. Kadir bey vardı. Bir hitabede bulundu ve süvariler alandan süratle ayrıldı. Biraz sonra dönüp resmi geçit yaptılar. Arkalarından da kamyonetle Sıhh. ler ve yaralılar geçtiler. Dayanamayıp parka girerek ağladım. Sonra eve geldim. ***** geldi. Tekrar çarşıya çıktık.*** ve terzi *****’le şehitliğe gittik. Fatiha okuduk. Sonra panayıra gittik. Gezerken babamı gördüm. Annemgil de panayıra seyre gelmişler. ******* ve ******’la gezdik.****** meğer bana dargınmış bugün anladım. düşsen ayağından tutup ta vallahi kaldırmam seni dedi. Çok gücüme gitti. Bilmem ki ben bu çocuğa ne yaptım. Öğle yemeğinde bu üzüntümü babam da anladı ve niye yüzün karargın dedi. Hiç dedim. Yatacaktım yatamadım. Evden çıkıp millet bahçesine geldim ve bu satırları karalıyorum.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2014
  12. Hakan

    Hakan RETIRED MOD

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    My bad. Its in the recycle bin.:angel:
     
  13. Chinese-Dragon

    Chinese-Dragon PDF THINK TANK: ANALYST

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    Hey brother, let's not flame this thread. Keep this thread informative and useful.
     
  14. Hakan

    Hakan RETIRED MOD

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    No offence to you by the way with the above picture.

    Halfway on topic: Ive read some good stuff about the chinese soldiers. pretty durable troops and very mobile.
     
  15. TurAr

    TurAr SENIOR MEMBER

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    I already told that it is probably just a myth. So stop being an attention whore and don't start an argument you are gonna lose. Never do that.
     
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