What's new

Decrease in Average Height of Adults in India Alarming: Study

Great Janjua

SENIOR MEMBER
Aug 13, 2016
2,564
-3
2,728
Country
United Kingdom
Location
Pakistan
Not only India but the whole subcontinent is affected by shortened height, which is mostly due to poor living standards, lack of nutrients and food security. Just take Punjab for example nowadays the teens roaming around are way shorter like on average 5.8. In the olden days, Punjabi people were very tall due to their organic, natural, full of nutrients and densely packed diets. No wonder when you sit next to aged people from that era they tell you of such extraordinary stories from their adolescence which were full of energy, athleticism and the grit the courage they maintained, whilst occasionally taking digs at the modern-day breed for being upfront lazy sods.


@Mentee have a crack at this thread old pal.
 
Last edited:

lonelyman

SENIOR MEMBER
Feb 19, 2015
3,752
-14
8,386
Country
China
Location
China
Decrease in Average Height of Adults in India Alarming: Study
Non-genetic factors like food intake, standard of living and health care play a big role in determining height.
Newsclick Report

25 Sep 2021
View attachment 780706
The average height of adults in India is declining as against an increase in average heights worldwide. The situation is alarming, pointed out a recent study titled ‘Trends of adult height in India from 1998 to 2015: Evidence from the National Family and Health Survey’.

“In the context of an overall increase in average heights worldwide, the decline in average height of adults in India is alarming and demands an urgent enquiry. The argument for different standards of height for the Indian population as different genetic groups needs further scrutiny,” the authors of the study said. However, the trends from India clearly underline the need to examine the non-genetic factors and also to understand the interplay of genetic, nutritional and other social and environmental determinants on height, they added.

To trace the trends of height among adults in India, the authors conducted quantitative secondary data analysis to explore the variation in height. The data on height on a large scale is collected under the erstwhile National Nutritional Monitoring Bureau (NNMB) and the National Family Health Survey (NFHS).

In the 15-25 age group, the mean height of Indian women showed significant improvement between NFHS-II and NFHS-III. However, between NFHS-III and NFHS-IV, their average height declined by 0.12 cm. Between NFHS-III and IV, tribal women in the same age group showed a significant decline in their average height by 0.42 cm. The average height of women in the poorest wealth index category was observed to have suffered a significant decline.

The average height of Indian men in this age group has significantly declined by 1.10 cm between NFHS-III and IV. The decline in average height was observed across religious group, caste or tribe, residence and wealth index.

The state-wise trends of average height of men in 15-25 age group find only men from Nagaland showing significant improvement in their average height. Himachal Pradesh, Manipur, Meghalaya, and Mizoram also showed improvement in the average height of men while rest of the states exhibited decline.

Height is widely accepted and recognised as one of the key measures of physical well-being and biological standard of living at the population level. In addition to genetic potential, other factors such as socio-economic condition, disease history, access to quality health services, and nutritional security have a significant bearing on human stature, according to the study.

“The role of nutrition over stature, however, has had a long and contested history among nutritionists, policymakers and health professionals. In India, the debate was recently fuelled by Dr [Arvind] Panagariya’s argument on stunting and subsequent critiques of it by various scholars. Evidently, much of this scholarship on stunting and height has focused on children,” the authors said. But “little attention has been paid to adult height, a more or less constant phenomenon having a higher potential for exploration of determinants”, they added.

The authors pointed out that genetic, environmental and social factors influence height. Although it is claimed that genetic factors determine 60%–80% of the final height, environmental and social factors contribute significantly to the realisation of that potential. The genetic potential in this case refers to an optimum level of height achievable in ideal conditions.

“An individual’s realisation of the given genetic potential is a reflection of food intake as well as availability, accessibility and effectiveness of health care services during the growing period. It is well established that the attained height of an individual is an embodiment of nutritional status and other determinants traced from womb to late adolescence,” the study stated.

Several studies in economics, health and nutrition demonstrate the relationship between gross domestic product, per capita expenditure on food, net nutritional intake, disease occurrence and stature. The authors said: “Adequate nutrition is closely linked with an individual’s achievement of his/her genetic potential of height growth. The impact of nutrition on height gain can start as early as foetal life. Malnutrition during infancy, especially stunting around puberty, significantly affects the final height gain in adulthood.”

On the other hand, “overall change in factors such as nutrition, sanitation, hygiene, transport and income have been found to positively impact height and weight gain among Indian schoolchildren. The international study of childhood poverty found the Mid Day Meal programme to have improved both stunting and underweight”.

According to the study, deficits in final height or the failure of realisation of genetic potential of a population ultimately reflect prior nutritional stress, which is conditioned by social and environmental factors over time. Socioeconomic factors, like household characteristics (number of siblings, occupation, class and locality, etc.), have a bearing on human stature. Caste is another social factor that shapes different socioeconomic determinants and consequent inequality across different aspects of life in India.

Data from NFHS-IV showed strong and significant correlation between average adult height and social category. The average height of people belonging to the Scheduled Tribe and Scheduled Caste category were found to be shorter than Other Backward Classes and others. Moreover, across all these categories, the richest in the wealth index had the highest mean height while the poorest had the lowest, clearly signalling the role of class, the study showed.

“Analysis of NFHS III data shows higher socioeconomic status to be associated with greater height and greater secular increase in height. So far as gender is concerned, over time, the average heights of both Indian males and females have improved but the improvement was higher in males compared to females.”

According to the authors, despite considerable evidence to the contrary, the role of genetic factors has often been used to downplay the role of food intake, standard of living and health care, especially in countries like India. The role of socioeconomic and environmental factors is left out of the equation.

The authors raised questions like “what is the genetic potential for height in Indian population?” Is it different for other countries or population groups? Are we achieving that genetic potential? What factors shape realisation of the given genetic potential?

The authors concluded that “the trends from India clearly underline the need for examining the non-genetic factors to understand and find solutions to these disturbing trends”.

a short supa powa :rofl:
 

Sainthood 101

SENIOR MEMBER
Jul 24, 2021
3,571
-2
3,979
Country
Pakistan
Location
United States
Not only India but the whole subcontinent is affected by shortened height, which is mostly due to poor living standards, lack of nutrients and food security. Just take Punjab for example nowadays the teens roaming around are way shorter like on average 5.8. In the olden days, Punjabi people were very tall due to their organic, natural, full of nutrients and densely packed diets. No wonder when you sit next to aged people from that era they tell you of such extraordinary stories from their adolescence which were full of energy, athleticism and the grit the courage they maintained, whilst occasionally taking digs at the modern-day breed for being upfront lazy sods.
From a nation of Ranjeet Singh, janjuas, kokhars, jutts, the backbone in the army's of SC

Punjab is slowly becoming a nation of Pajeet Singhs, really sad to see
 

Great Janjua

SENIOR MEMBER
Aug 13, 2016
2,564
-3
2,728
Country
United Kingdom
Location
Pakistan
From a nation of Ranjeet Singh, jan
From a nation of Ranjeet Singh, janjuas, kokhars, jutts, the backbone in the army's of SC

Punjab is slowly becoming a nation of Pajeet Singhs, really sad to see
An extremely good post. This is merely the reality nowadays.
From a nation of Ranjeet Singh, janjuas, kokhars, jutts, the backbone in the army's of SC

Punjab is slowly becoming a nation of Pajeet Singhs, really sad to see
An extremely good post. This is merely the reality nowadays.

Sorry for the late reply this forum has become very hard to use since they went app free. I mostly surf on Android.
 

Sainthood 101

SENIOR MEMBER
Jul 24, 2021
3,571
-2
3,979
Country
Pakistan
Location
United States
Not only India but the whole subcontinent is affected by shortened height, which is mostly due to poor living standards, lack of nutrients and food security. Just take Punjab for example nowadays the teens roaming around are way shorter like on average 5.8. In the olden days, Punjabi people were very tall due to their organic, natural, full of nutrients and densely packed diets. No wonder when you sit next to aged people from that era they tell you of such extraordinary stories from their adolescence which were full of energy, athleticism and the grit the courage they maintained, whilst occasionally taking digs at the modern-day breed for being upfront lazy aods.


@Mentee have a crack at this thread pal.
I mean they're right to talk shit tbh

Just think about it they faught the Japanese in WW2 where entire villages were recruited and faught in the jungles, faced the brutality of partition, ordinary people went out in 65 and faught/helped

Of course when these guys go and see the punjab of today they'll be disappointed
 

beijingwalker

ELITE MEMBER
Nov 4, 2011
43,030
-5
84,480
Country
China
Location
China
Normally fast economic growth brings height growth. India economic growth is either fake or grabbed by interest groups.
Indian growth is just Indian and western propaganda, the country falls in many sectors in human development studies.
 

PradoTLC

SENIOR MEMBER
Mar 17, 2007
5,334
1
5,978
Country
Pakistan
Location
United Arab Emirates
Decrease in Average Height of Adults in India Alarming: Study
Non-genetic factors like food intake, standard of living and health care play a big role in determining height.
Newsclick Report

25 Sep 2021
View attachment 780706
The average height of adults in India is declining as against an increase in average heights worldwide. The situation is alarming, pointed out a recent study titled ‘Trends of adult height in India from 1998 to 2015: Evidence from the National Family and Health Survey’.

“In the context of an overall increase in average heights worldwide, the decline in average height of adults in India is alarming and demands an urgent enquiry. The argument for different standards of height for the Indian population as different genetic groups needs further scrutiny,” the authors of the study said. However, the trends from India clearly underline the need to examine the non-genetic factors and also to understand the interplay of genetic, nutritional and other social and environmental determinants on height, they added.

To trace the trends of height among adults in India, the authors conducted quantitative secondary data analysis to explore the variation in height. The data on height on a large scale is collected under the erstwhile National Nutritional Monitoring Bureau (NNMB) and the National Family Health Survey (NFHS).

In the 15-25 age group, the mean height of Indian women showed significant improvement between NFHS-II and NFHS-III. However, between NFHS-III and NFHS-IV, their average height declined by 0.12 cm. Between NFHS-III and IV, tribal women in the same age group showed a significant decline in their average height by 0.42 cm. The average height of women in the poorest wealth index category was observed to have suffered a significant decline.

The average height of Indian men in this age group has significantly declined by 1.10 cm between NFHS-III and IV. The decline in average height was observed across religious group, caste or tribe, residence and wealth index.

The state-wise trends of average height of men in 15-25 age group find only men from Nagaland showing significant improvement in their average height. Himachal Pradesh, Manipur, Meghalaya, and Mizoram also showed improvement in the average height of men while rest of the states exhibited decline.

Height is widely accepted and recognised as one of the key measures of physical well-being and biological standard of living at the population level. In addition to genetic potential, other factors such as socio-economic condition, disease history, access to quality health services, and nutritional security have a significant bearing on human stature, according to the study.

“The role of nutrition over stature, however, has had a long and contested history among nutritionists, policymakers and health professionals. In India, the debate was recently fuelled by Dr [Arvind] Panagariya’s argument on stunting and subsequent critiques of it by various scholars. Evidently, much of this scholarship on stunting and height has focused on children,” the authors said. But “little attention has been paid to adult height, a more or less constant phenomenon having a higher potential for exploration of determinants”, they added.

The authors pointed out that genetic, environmental and social factors influence height. Although it is claimed that genetic factors determine 60%–80% of the final height, environmental and social factors contribute significantly to the realisation of that potential. The genetic potential in this case refers to an optimum level of height achievable in ideal conditions.

“An individual’s realisation of the given genetic potential is a reflection of food intake as well as availability, accessibility and effectiveness of health care services during the growing period. It is well established that the attained height of an individual is an embodiment of nutritional status and other determinants traced from womb to late adolescence,” the study stated.

Several studies in economics, health and nutrition demonstrate the relationship between gross domestic product, per capita expenditure on food, net nutritional intake, disease occurrence and stature. The authors said: “Adequate nutrition is closely linked with an individual’s achievement of his/her genetic potential of height growth. The impact of nutrition on height gain can start as early as foetal life. Malnutrition during infancy, especially stunting around puberty, significantly affects the final height gain in adulthood.”

On the other hand, “overall change in factors such as nutrition, sanitation, hygiene, transport and income have been found to positively impact height and weight gain among Indian schoolchildren. The international study of childhood poverty found the Mid Day Meal programme to have improved both stunting and underweight”.

According to the study, deficits in final height or the failure of realisation of genetic potential of a population ultimately reflect prior nutritional stress, which is conditioned by social and environmental factors over time. Socioeconomic factors, like household characteristics (number of siblings, occupation, class and locality, etc.), have a bearing on human stature. Caste is another social factor that shapes different socioeconomic determinants and consequent inequality across different aspects of life in India.

Data from NFHS-IV showed strong and significant correlation between average adult height and social category. The average height of people belonging to the Scheduled Tribe and Scheduled Caste category were found to be shorter than Other Backward Classes and others. Moreover, across all these categories, the richest in the wealth index had the highest mean height while the poorest had the lowest, clearly signalling the role of class, the study showed.

“Analysis of NFHS III data shows higher socioeconomic status to be associated with greater height and greater secular increase in height. So far as gender is concerned, over time, the average heights of both Indian males and females have improved but the improvement was higher in males compared to females.”

According to the authors, despite considerable evidence to the contrary, the role of genetic factors has often been used to downplay the role of food intake, standard of living and health care, especially in countries like India. The role of socioeconomic and environmental factors is left out of the equation.

The authors raised questions like “what is the genetic potential for height in Indian population?” Is it different for other countries or population groups? Are we achieving that genetic potential? What factors shape realisation of the given genetic potential?

The authors concluded that “the trends from India clearly underline the need for examining the non-genetic factors to understand and find solutions to these disturbing trends”.


this is what happens you stop drinking cow milk and start drinking cow pee.
Lets look at Indian version of James Bond.

View attachment 780788

View attachment 780789

:lol:

he needs to see a dentist.
 

Leishangthem

FULL MEMBER
Mar 12, 2019
1,690
-6
1,768
Country
India
Location
India
This is a big problem Pakistan is also facing
100 years ago Pakistanis were 5'9 now I think it's 5'8

While countries around the globe have increased Thier heights several inches

Need reforms ASAP
That's not true at all,the tallest people in the world 100 years ago was the British with average height near 5 ft 6-7.

So for some reason Pakistani heights are unreliable as true research into this wasn't conducted (if someone has access to reliable data share it please) so next best is data of Britain where I think 9% of thier pop is Pakistani

In Britain

Average Pakistani is 175 cm

Average Indian is 173 cm

Average Bengali is 169 cm

Average British black jamaican is 176 cm

Average British white is 179 cm

That's not average height of Pakistani/India/bengali men . That paper is about a thesis regarding the relation of height for offspring with the ethnicity of the father.
 
Last edited:

arjunk

SENIOR MEMBER
Apr 16, 2020
2,200
1
4,488
Country
Pakistan
Location
Pakistan
Sugary and vegetarian diet, unhealthy weight loss during childhood or puberty, begging for bobs and veganae on the internet all day instead of playing sports, etc.

In America the average height for young people is 5'11 (all of them will round it to 6'0). This is mostly because of the sheer number of calories they consume throughout their life. For the same reason, you will only find 600lb people who need mobility scooters to walk in America.

Pakistan and India should heavily encourage their youth to play sports instead of useless video games and youtube videos until at least the age of 15. A more lenient China style restriction could be imposed. Along with that, the portion sizes should be increased like in America.

This will result in significant height increases over one or two generations. I know people of every ethnicity in Pakistan and some Northern Indians who are 6'+ and ate a lot during their childhood. 15-16 year old boys from privileged families are already hitting 5'9-5'11 nowadays.
 

DrJekyll

FULL MEMBER
Sep 8, 2021
207
0
399
Country
India
Location
India
To be honest I find this rather surprising. When I look around me I can see that people are clearly taller than what they used to be, say a generation ago. Almost all high school and junior college kids (16-18 years age group) are my height or taller nowadays (I am 5'9). My 14 year old nephew is same height as me. My experience from urban areas may be skewed, but I don't find anything alarming at all.
 

Leishangthem

FULL MEMBER
Mar 12, 2019
1,690
-6
1,768
Country
India
Location
India
Chinese are also short. Tall Chinese is just a propaganda to make Chinese equal to westerners.

Minimum height requirement for joining pak army is 5 feet 6 inch and 5 feet 7 inch for Punjab police. It means Pakistans average height is close to 6 or 7 inch
chinese stats don't show they are equal to Westerners.
The height requirement for all the army in south asia |(PAK\/INDIA/\BD|)is 163 cm( 5ft 3) in average and lower ,not more than that.
 
Last edited:

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Total: 1, Members: 0, Guests: 1)


Top Bottom