What's new

Death threats to Karnataka judges over hijab verdict; 2 arrested

xeuss

SENIOR MEMBER
Aug 22, 2019
4,256
6
9,090
Country
India
Location
United States
Even if he did what you allege, he did not hide behind the veil of 'scared whatever' and rarely is a politician not a criminal of some sorts. Other than that, he has scared the shit out of snakes within India, that is something you & me both agree.

A 'terrorist majority' gives 'veiled threats' and a 'scared minority' gives open threats. Yeh right!

Have you slept since the assembly elections results?


We have shown you a glimpse what we expect.
Thats why you are seething and hiding behind a fake name.


ok. so no more a 'scared minority' then? please confirm.

I am really not sure what you are trying to say here. But it does look like you are agreeing with everything I have said and defending what has been done by the depraved society.

This is quite common for members of the depraved society. They have no regrets about their depravity and will go to any extent to defend it.
 

jamahir

ELITE MEMBER
Jul 9, 2014
27,000
2
23,629
Country
India
Location
India
You may need your maulana to tell you things.
We Indians know about Ramayana & Mahabharata & Bhagwat Geeta without any Sadguru.

Your point was :
For us, India i.e. Bharat is a land much before recorded history.
Ciao.
The books you mention are not that old. Hinduism came into India from Iranic lands about 3000 years ago and those books were composed in India much later. "Bharat" didn't exist until after 1000 BC. :)

Pandit Koka Ram. :lol: :lol: :lol:

I don't think we should be that sneering. :)
 

Akshay89

BANNED
Mar 1, 2022
479
0
524
Country
India
Location
India
I am a Communist Muslim. That's enough to describe my broader thinking and the means of posting on PDF.
You cannot be a Communist and a Muslim at the same.

I think you need to exit this confused stage of your life. And choose one path.
 

Kingdom come

FULL MEMBER
Jun 15, 2021
338
-1
269
Country
United Kingdom
Location
India
You cannot be a Communist and a Muslim at the same.

I think you need to exit this confused stage of your life. And choose one path.
You cannot be a Communist and a Muslim at the same.

I think you need to exit this c

onfused stage of your life. And choose one path.
Is this your twitter lol

[URLhttps://mobile.twitter.com/ShortURL2021/status/1505456304340762624 unfurl="true"].

https://mobile.twitter.com/ShortURL2021/with_replies[/URL]
Since I found the twitter of @Akshay89 he won't reply to me

@jamahir


 
Last edited:

jamahir

ELITE MEMBER
Jul 9, 2014
27,000
2
23,629
Country
India
Location
India
You cannot be a Communist and a Muslim at the same.

I think you need to exit this confused stage of your life. And choose one path.

Oh man, another one. :hitwall:

Baba jani, Communism as we know it now is a process that started since ancient times and various progressive thoughts contributed. Muslims have been associated with modern Communism since the early 1900s. I will quote two sections from an article by Pakistani journalist Nadeem Paracha and is about Communist and Socialist activism among Muslims since the early 1900s :
During the same period (1920s-30s), another (though lesser known) Islamic scholar in undivided India got smitten by the 1917 Russian revolution and Marxism.

Hafiz Rahman Sihwarwl saw Islam and Marxism sharing five elements in common: (1) prohibition of the accumulation of wealth in the hands of the privileged classes (2) organisation of the economic structure of the state to ensure social welfare (3) equality of opportunity for all human beings (4) priority of collective social interest over individual privilege and (5) prevention of the permanentising of class structure through social revolution.

The motivations for many of these themes he drew from the Qur’an, which he understood as seeking to create an economic order in which the rich pay excessive, though voluntary taxes (Zakat) to minimise differences in living standards.

In the areas that Sihwarwl saw Islam and communism diverge were Islam’s sanction of private ownership within certain limits, and in its refusal to recognise an absolutely classless basis of society.

He suggested that Islam, with its prohibition of the accumulation of wealth, is able to control the class structure through equality of opportunity.

Basically, both Sindhi and Sihwarwl had stumbled upon an Islamic concept of the social democratic welfare state.

Building upon the initial thoughts of Sindhi and Sihwarwl were perhaps South Asia’s two most ardent and articulate supporters and theoreticians of Islamic Socilaism: Ghulam Ahmed Parvez and Dr. Khalifa Abdul Hakim.

Parvez was a prominent ‘Quranist’, or an Islamic scholar who insisted that for the Muslims to make progress in the modern world, Islamic thought and laws should be entirely based on the modern interpretations of the Qu’ran and on the complete rejection of the hadith (sayings of the Prophet and his companions based on hearsay and compiled over a 100 years after the Prophet’s demise).

After studying traditional Muslim texts, as well as Sufism, Parvez claimed that almost all hadiths were fabrications by those who wanted Islam to seem like an intolerant faith and by ancient Muslim kings who used these hadiths to give divine legitimacy to their tyrannical rules.

Parvez also insisted that Muslims should spend more time studying the modern sciences instead of wasting their energies on fighting out ancient sectarian conflicts or ignoring the true egalitarian and enlightening spirit of the Qu’ran by indulging in multiple rituals handed down to them by ancient ulema, clerics and compilers of the hadith.

Understandably, Parvez was right away attacked by conservative Islamic scholars and political outfits.

But this didn’t stop famous Muslim philosopher and poet, Muhammad Iqbal, to befriend the young scholar and then introduce him to the future founder of Pakistan, Muhammad Ali Jinnah.

Jinnah appointed Parvez to edit a magazine, Talu-e-Islam. It was set-up to propagate the creation of a separate Muslim country and to also answer the attacks that Jinnah’s All India Muslim League had begun to face from conservative Islamic parties and ulema who accused the League of being a pseudo-Muslim organisation and Jinnah for being too westernised and ‘lacking correct Islamic behavior.’

Apart from continuing to author books and commentaries on the Qu’ran, Parvez wrote a series of articles in Talu-e-Islam that propagated a more socialistic view of the holy book.

In a series of essays for the magazine he used verses from the Qu’ran, incidents from the faith’s history and insights from the writings of Muhammad Iqbal to claim:

The clergy and conservative ulema have hijacked Islam.

They are agents of the rich people and promoters of uncontrolled Capitalism.

Socialism best enforces Qur’anic dictums on property, justice and distribution of wealth.

Islam’s main mission was the eradication of all injustices and cruelties from society. It was a socio-economic movement, and the Prophet was a leader seeking to put an end to the capitalist exploitation of the Quraysh merchants and the corrupt bureaucracy of Byzantium and Persia.

According to the Qur’an, Muslims have three main responsibilities: seeing, hearing and sensing through the agency of the mind. Consequently, real knowledge is based on empirically verifiable observation, or through the role of science.

Poverty is the punishment of God and deserved by those who ignore science.

In Muslim/Islamic societies, science, as well as agrarian reform should play leading roles in developing an industrialised economy.

A socialist path is a correction of the medieval distortion of Islam through Shari’a.
Though one can struggle to pinpoint the exact starting point (or points) from where the many ideas that became associated with Islamic Socialism emerged, historians and intellectuals, Sami A. Hanna and Hanif Ramay – who specialised in critiquing and compiling a dialectic history of Islamic Socialism – are of the view that one of the very first expressions of Islamic Socialism appeared in Russia in the late 19th and early 20th century.

A movement of Muslim farmers, peasants and petty-bourgeoisie in the Russian state of Tatartan opposed the Russian monarchy but was brutally crushed.

In the early 2oth century, the movement went underground and began working with communist, socialist and social democratic forces operating in Russia to overthrow the monarchy.

The leaders of the Muslim movement, that became to be known as the Waisi began explaining themselves as Islamic Socialists when a leftist revolution broke out against the Russian monarchy in 1906.

During the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution that finally toppled and eliminated the Russian monarchy and imposed communist rule in the country, the Waisi fell in with the Bolsheviks and supported Russian revolutionary leader, Vladimir Lenin’s widespread socialist program and policies.

However, after Lenin’s death in 1924, the Waisi began to assert that the Muslim community and its socialism in Tatartan were a separate entity from the Bolshevik communism.

The movement that had formed its own communes became a victim of Stalin’s radical purges of the 1930s and was wiped out.
Please read that thread's OP and the thread discussion because ATM you do not know better than me or the above scholars and those activists.

To add to the above, do you know that in 1951 the Pakistani poet and leftist activist and his Communist and Socialist comrades in the administration did a coup in Pakistan and almost took over the governance of the country ? Their coup attempt is known by their opponents as the "Rawalpindi Conspiracy".
 

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Total: 1, Members: 0, Guests: 1)


Top Bottom