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'Dark future': The distress of Afghan women who can no longer work

ghazi52

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'Dark future': The distress of Afghan women who can no longer work

Except in specialised sectors such as health and education, few Afghan women have worked since the Taliban took power in August.

AFP

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At 21 years old, Madina had her dream job: she was a journalist, her salary crucial to her family's life in Afghanistan.
Then the Taliban came.

Now, like so many other Afghan women, Madina cannot work and her family has lost her income — just as Afghanistan's economy collapses and the UN predicts half its population could run out of food during the long, cold winter.

It leaves Madina, trapped behind closed doors, to wonder anxiously how her family will pay the rent and buy the wood to heat their home until spring.

“I have a dark future ahead,” said Madina, whose name has been changed to protect her identity.

Just a few months ago, the young woman worked for an American-funded radio station. She dreamed of presenting the news on television and perhaps, later on, entering politics.

Now the station is off the air, and looking for a new job would be futile.

Except in specialised sectors such as health and education, few women have worked since the Taliban drove the Western-backed government from Kabul and took power in August.

Last year, under the previous government, more than 27 per cent of civil servants were women. Now, the Taliban have told them to stay home until further notice.

Many families have lost a significant part of their income, just as Afghanistan faces one of the world's worst humanitarian crises.

More than 22 million Afghans will suffer food insecurity this winter, the UN has said, as a drought, driven by climate change, adds to the disruption caused by the chaotic Taliban takeover.

This photo, taken on November 13, 2021, shows Madina, an Afghan former female journalist whose name has been changed to protect her identity, during an interview with *AFP* in Kabul. — AFP


This photo, taken on November 13, 2021, shows Madina, an Afghan former female journalist whose name has been changed to protect her identity, during an interview with AFPin Kabul. — AFP

Madina, who lives with her parents, is the oldest of four girls and two boys. Her father, a labourer, gambled on her education, which until the Taliban reached Kabul seemed like a good bet.

The family lived on two salaries, Madina's and her father's.

“I was paying the rent,” she says. “When I had a job, I could meet the family's needs.”

But they now have to buy basic staples such as rice and flour on credit — and despite winter's cold already biting, they can't afford coal or wood to heat their home.

“It's very painful for me to see these difficulties,” Madina says.


'In prison'

Rabia — who also spoke under a pseudonym — worked at the Ministry of Mines and Petroleum. On August 15 at 10am, she left her office in a panic when the Taliban entered Kabul.

Her male colleagues have resumed their jobs — but she can't go back.

“I feel I'm in a prison in my house,” the 25-year-old says.

Rabia lives with her sister and brother, who are teachers. Both work but have not been paid.
“We're living on our savings,” she says.

There are eight of them in the family, and savings will not last long.

“In two or three months? I don't know, we'll need money to get the house warm in winter,” Rabia says. “I'm asking the international community to put pressure on the Taliban so they allow women to work again. They are often the only breadwinner in the family.”


'So ashamed'

Laila, whose name has also been changed, is her family's only earner.

Before, she worked as a cleaner for an Afghan family, but they fled when the Taliban came.

Now the 43-year-old begs in a Kabul market, where — as the only woman among men — she makes sure to wear a burqa to “protect my dignity, a little”.

This photo, taken on November 16, 2021, shows Laila, whose name has been changed to protect her identity, speaking during an interview with *AFP* in Kabul. An Afghan mother of six children, she started to beg on the streets after losing her job when her employer fled the country. — AFP


This photo, taken on November 16, 2021, shows Laila, whose name has been changed to protect her identity, speaking during an interview with AFPin Kabul. An Afghan mother of six children, she started to beg on the streets after losing her job when her employer fled the country. — AFP

She has six children to support, alone. She doesn't know where her husband is, speculating that he is dead, or has left her for another woman.

“My children are at home. They don't know I'm begging. I have to find money to feed them ... We do not have a glass of flour at home,” she says. “I'm so ashamed. It's the first time in my life I'm begging.”

When asked if she can provide for her family this way, she bursts into tears.

“I'm very sad,” she says. “I have never seen so many difficulties in my life as I have seen in these two weeks.”
Madina says she, too, cries every day.

She hardly goes out anymore; she is too afraid of the Taliban. Instead, her day is limited to housework and reading.
“I don't talk about my situation to my friends. We are all the same, it's useless,” she says.

Rabia admits she also feels “depressed”.

“I'm not good mentally,” she says — but she is trying to put on a brave face for her family.

After all, as they tell her: “You're not the only one in this situation. “
 

ARMalik

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Right, so US comes to A-Stan after 9/11, and kills thousands of people. Drops thousands of bombs, litters the whole of A-Stan with mines, BUT USA IS THE SAVIORS AND THE TALIBAN ARE EVIL !!

People who believe and support in such US logic are frankly disgusting and scum of Earth, and also participating in killing of innocent people.
 

ghazi52

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Right, so US comes to A-Stan after 9/11, and kills thousands of people. Drops thousands of bombs, litters the whole of A-Stan with mines, BUT USA IS THE SAVIORS AND THE TALIBAN ARE EVIL !!

People who believe and support in such US logic are frankly disgusting and scum of Earth, and also participating in killing of innocent people.
True.
 

waz

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Let's hope inshallah they bring women to the fold of work.
Hazart Umar(ra) employed the women of the ummah in important roles;

Shifa Abdullah was one of Prophet Muhammad’s female companions, whom Umar entrusted with a leadership role in monitoring and supervising commercial transactions in the entire marketplace of Madinah, the first capital of the Islamic empire.

She was responsible for ensuring that business transactions were conducted according to Islamic law. She patrolled the market, making sure that proper business conducts were in place. Umar recognised Shifa’s knowledge and understanding of Islam, and advised traders to consult her on matters pertaining to the legality of transactions. The appointment of Shifa was so successful that Umar appointed another woman, Samra Nuhayk, as the market controller in Mecca.
 

ghazi52

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Let's hope inshallah they bring women to the fold of work.
Hazart Umar(ra) employed the women of the ummah in important roles;

Shifa Abdullah was one of Prophet Muhammad’s female companions, whom Umar entrusted with a leadership role in monitoring and supervising commercial transactions in the entire marketplace of Madinah, the first capital of the Islamic empire.

She was responsible for ensuring that business transactions were conducted according to Islamic law. She patrolled the market, making sure that proper business conducts were in place. Umar recognised Shifa’s knowledge and understanding of Islam, and advised traders to consult her on matters pertaining to the legality of transactions. The appointment of Shifa was so successful that Umar appointed another woman, Samra Nuhayk, as the market controller in Mecca.

Insha'Allah!
 

Faqirze

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Right, so US comes to A-Stan after 9/11, and kills thousands of people. Drops thousands of bombs, litters the whole of A-Stan with mines, BUT USA IS THE SAVIORS
Do most Afghans really believe this?
 

ghazi52

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US’s West welcomes decree on women, says more is needed


The Frontier Post





KABUL (Tolo News): The US Special Representative for Afghanistan, Thomas West, said he welcomes the decree of Mullah Hibatullah Akhundzada, the supreme leader of the Taliban, on women’s rights. Hibatullah Akhundzada issued a six-article decree regarding women’s rights saying that women must consent to marriage, and forced marriage must stop.

The decree also stipulated that the relevant institutions must take steps in its implementation.

“Welcome today’s decree reinforcing a woman’s right to determine if and whom she marries,” West said. West also said that in addition to women’s rights over marriage choices, much more is needed to be done to ensure women’s full participation in the social and political life of Afghanistan. “At the same, much more is needed to ensure women’s rights in every aspect of Afghan society including schools, workplaces, politics and media,” West said in a tweet.


The new decree on women rights comes as the international community has repeatedly called on the Islamic Emirate to preserve the last 20 year’s achievements, especially women’s and girls’ rights for work and education.

Women’s and girls’ rights have been set as a condition by the international community for the recognition of the Islamic Emirate government. Meanwhile, a number of Afghan female activists also welcomed the Taliban leader’s move, describing it as a major step, but called for further actions regarding women rights.

“This is big, this is huge … if it is done as it is supposed to be, this is the first time they have come up with a decree like this,” said Mahbouba Seraj, an activist and the executive director of the Afghan Women’s Skills Development Center, speaking from Kabul on a Reuters Next conference panel.

The former Afghan ambassador to the United States, Roya Rahmani, also said it was an amazing step. “An amazing thing if it does get implemented,” Rahmani told Reuters Next panel. The activists said that more needs to be done regarding women’s rights to education and work.
 

Super Falcon

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With proper hijab theyshould work these talibans renforcing their version

In times of war golden era of MOHAMMAD PBUH woman were working as nurses
 

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