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Featured CoronaVirus in Pakistan - Updates & Discussion

Shahzaz ud din

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Pakistan's low case count makes it particularly remarkable" Toronto Sun


A worker wearing a Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) suit (C) sprays disinfectant while other workers tag cross signs on chairs for social distancing at the Capital University of Science and Technology in Islamabad on September 10, 2020, following the government's annoucement about reopening educational institutes starting from September 15, nearly six months after the spread of Covid-19 coronavirus pandemic. PHOTO BY AAMIR QURESHI /AFP via Getty Images

The COVID-19 surge in many parts of the world is disturbing.

Europe has seen massive spikes, notably in France, Spain and the UK. Even Canada is grappling with rising numbers a second time, particularly in Ontario and Quebec.

South of the border, the number of deaths has topped 200,000. But among all these pandemic woes there have been a number of countries with success stories, and the rest of the world can learn from their experiences.

Of the seven nations that, according to the WHO, have so far been spared the worst of the pandemic, the case of Pakistan is particularly remarkable. Although it too is experiencing a mild surge, the country has seen nowhere near the devastation experienced by its closest neighbours: India to the east and Iran to the west.

Pakistan’s population is young, but that may not be its only advantage. There is also speculation that Pakistanis have a natural immunity toward viruses, having lived in an environment that is full of pathogens. While that could also be said for India, where the situation now appears uncontrollable, Pakistan has taken a few measures that the WHO has applauded.

It is ironic that a developing country has been able to deal with a crisis like this better than many first world nations. Could it be that it is simply more used to handling disasters? In this case, Pakistan’s misfortunes have proved to be its strengths.


Pakistan is one of just three countries where polio still strikes the vulnerable — the others being Afghanistan and Nigeria. Polio eradication has been a challenge because so many Pakistanis are illiterate and therefore ignorant of the real causes.

They may refuse vaccination, often in favour of prayer or folk cures. Although Pakistan has also failed to deliver medical assistance in areas where it is most needed, due to its poor health infrastructure, it has vowed to eradicate polio within the coming two years.

It has established systems to track the infection, making meticulous records of affected families within various community clusters. There also are now many female community health workers who administer the polio vaccine.

The WHO reports that Pakistan has used these existing systems to also keep tabs on the coronavirus. Director Tedros Ghebreyesus said that “Community health workers who have been trained to go door to door vaccinating children for polio have been utilized for surveillance, contact tracing and care.”

Pakistan has been cordoning off infected areas in targeted “smart lockdowns”. Traffic in and out of such clusters is greatly restricted. Other countries, like Vietnam, Taiwan and South Korea have also used existing infrastructure, having the experience of other viruses like SARS.

While such measures may be more challenging in Western nations, where people cherish individual freedom, New Zealand also restricted traffic for residents when the epidemic peaked in the Auckland area.

It is still quite puzzling that in Canada we cannot emulate such examples, especially where numbers are rising in leaps and bounds, such as Ontario. Tests may reflect an accurate picture on the ground, but tighter controls on movement may also be beneficial while tapping into existing infrastructure, especially when half the cases in Ontario cannot be traced to other contacts.

It is a rare honour for Pakistan that it can teach something to the more enlightened and progressive outside world, but its citizens can be proud of its low case count so far.
 

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WHO chief lauds Pakistan for suppressing Covid-19 while keeping economy afloat
AFP | Dawn.comUpdated 30 Sep 2020
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WHO chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus says it's “never too late to turn things around” in the fight against Covid-19.  — AFP/File

WHO chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus says it's “never too late to turn things around” in the fight against Covid-19. — AFP/File
World Health Organisation (WHO) chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus has once again praised Pakistan's response to the coronavirus, saying the country managed to fight the pandemic while allowing its economy to pick up as the country stabilises.
In an op-ed in the British online newspaper The Independent, Tedros noted that Pakistan had deployed the infrastructure built over many years for polio to combat Covid-19.
"Community health workers who have been trained to go door-to-door vaccinating children against polio have been redeployed and utilised for surveillance, contact tracing and care," he wrote.
Related: Fighting Covid and polio: How the 1166 helpline is working to counter misinformation, address fears
ARTICLE CONTINUES AFTER AD

He said this strategy had "suppressed the virus so that, as the country stabilises, the economy is also now picking up once again".
Pakistan's response reinforces "the lesson that the choice is not between controlling the virus or saving the economy; the two go hand-in-hand", the WHO chief added.
Besides Pakistan, Tedros picked out certain other countries for praise, notably Thailand, Italy and Uruguay, for their handling of the pandemic.
He said the grim milestone of one million Covid-19 deaths should spur the planet into fighting back against the disease, insisting that it was “never too late to turn things around”.
Tedros said there were encouraging signs of hope, citing vaccine candidates in final-stage trials.


And he said that while the world awaited scientific breakthroughs, the new coronavirus could be effectively contained through proven public health measures.
“One million people have now been lost to Covid-19 and many more are suffering because of the pandemic,” he wrote.
“This milestone is a difficult moment for the world but there are glimmers of hope that encourage us now and in the near future.
“No matter where a country is in an outbreak, it is never too late to turn things around.”
'Seize the opportunity'
Tedros outlined four essential steps to get the pandemic under control, starting with preventing amplifying events and protecting vulnerable groups.
He stressed the need for individual responsibility in washing hands, wearing masks and keeping a distance; and for governments to find, isolate, test and care for cases, then trace and quarantine their contacts.
“While today's milestone gives us pause for reflection, this is a moment for us all to come together, in solidarity, to fight back against this virus,” Tedros said.
“History will judge us on the decisions we do and don't make in the months ahead. Let's seize the opportunity and bridge national boundaries to save lives and livelihoods.”
'One million tragedies'
The WHO chief reiterated his call for funding for the WHO-led ACT-Accelerator, a globally pooled hunt for Covid-19 vaccines, diagnostics and treatments.
The programme has just $3 billion of the $38 billion needed to meet the goal of producing and delivering two billion vaccine doses, 245 million treatments and 500 million diagnostic tests over the next year.
Meanwhile the Red Cross, also based in Geneva, said the death toll was one more tragic milestone in the rolling humanitarian catastrophe.
“Today, we stand in grim solidarity with the hundreds of thousands of families that have lost loved ones,” said Jagan Chapagain, secretary general of the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies.
“A million deaths represent one million individual tragedies and countless heartbreaks.”
He added that while fighting the pandemic, “we need to be planning for the support that millions of people will need to rebuild their lives even once this illness is finally defeated”.

 

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WHO lauds Pakistan for effectively containing COVID-19

Web Desk

04:31 PM | 24 Oct, 2020

WHO lauds Pakistan for effectively containing COVID-19


ISLAMABAD – The World Health Organization (WHO) has appreciated the response of federal and provincial governments for effectively containing the COVID-19 pandemic.
The WHO mission from EMRO region was presenting their findings at a debriefing session in Islamabad, chaired by Special Assistant to Prime Minister on National Health Services Dr Faisal Sultan.

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The WHO mission, comprising a team of WHO experts, is on ten day visit to Pakistan since 14th of this month, to review lesson learnt from Pakistan's COVID-19 response and to work with national and provincial health experts.
The main area of review was surveillance, point of entry, risk communication and community engagement, and continuity in essential health services.
 

aryadravida

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WHO lauds Pakistan for effectively containing COVID-19

Web Desk

04:31 PM | 24 Oct, 2020

WHO lauds Pakistan for effectively containing COVID-19


ISLAMABAD – The World Health Organization (WHO) has appreciated the response of federal and provincial governments for effectively containing the COVID-19 pandemic.
The WHO mission from EMRO region was presenting their findings at a debriefing session in Islamabad, chaired by Special Assistant to Prime Minister on National Health Services Dr Faisal Sultan.

View attachment 682347
The WHO mission, comprising a team of WHO experts, is on ten day visit to Pakistan since 14th of this month, to review lesson learnt from Pakistan's COVID-19 response and to work with national and provincial health experts.
The main area of review was surveillance, point of entry, risk communication and community engagement, and continuity in essential health services.
Why no more updates man?Pakistan is seeing spike in the cases with each passing day...yesterday it was 847...I believe it will get worse with winter approaching.
 

ejaz007

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707 new Covid-19 cases reported; three more lose lives across country

Agencies
OCTOBER 27, 2020
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The total active Covid-19 cases in Pakistan on Monday were recorded at 10,788 as 707 more people tested positive for the deadly virus across country.

Three coronavirus patients, who were under treatment at hospitals, died, according to the latest update issued by the National command and Operation Centre (NCOC). No Covid-affected person is on ventilator in Azad Jammu and Kashmir (AJK), Gilgit Baltistan (GB) and Balochistan, while 90 ventilators elsewhere in Pakistan, out of 1,884 allocated for Covid-19 patients, were occupied.

Some 26,492 tests were conducted across the country, including 9,019 in Sindh, 8,584 in Punjab, 4,560 in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KP), 2,990 in Islamabad Capital Territory (ICT), 501 in Balochistan, 241 in Gilgit Baltistan (GB), and 597 in Azad Jammu and Kashmir (AJK). Around 311,075 people have recovered from the disease so far across Pakistan making it a significant count with over 90 percent recovery ratio of the affected patients.

Since the pandemic outbreak, a total of 328,602 cases were detected so far, including AJK 3,846, Balochistan 15,810, GB 4,180, ICT 19,012, KP 39,043, Punjab 102,875 and Sindh 143,836. About 6,739 deaths were recorded in country since the eruption of the contagion, including 2,598 Sindh, 2,335 in Punjab, 1,269 in KP, 212 in ICT two of them died in hospital, 148 in Balochistan, 90 in GB and 87 in AJK one of them died in hospital. A total of 4,290,545 corona tests have been conducted so far, while 735 hospitals are equipped with Covid facilities. Some 813 coronavirus patients were admitted in hospitals across the country.

Balochistan Chief Minister Jam Kamal Khan Monday said that he has still not tested negative for coronavirus even 14 days after being diagnosed with the infection. “My retest of Covid after 14 days is showing positive. I request all of you to take precautions, use masks, if symptoms then keep isolation. let’s try not to be spreaders of this disease,” he tweeted. Khan had announced on October 13 via a tweet that he had tested positive for coronavirus.

 

Sarosh Ibrahim

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Witnessing the extent of the Covid-19 spread, is Pakistan looking at another lockdown in November?

It is expected that as the weeks will pass, the corona fear will begin to subside. The phenomenon will be especially prevalent in younger kids - those who have yet to come to terms with the gravity of the situation.

The result is inevitable: The second wave of COVID-19.

The world has already witnessed the extent of the COVID-19 spread after the re-opening of institutes in the United States of America. The American Academy of Pediatrics and Children’s Hospital Association reported 97,000 COVID-19 cases in just the last two weeks of July. Hong Kong re-opened schools in the last week of May, but were forced to suspend schools after a third wave of the virus hit them.

To prevent a second lockdown, the educational institutes must ensure full compliance with the SOPs - not only for the institute, but the students attending the institutes as well. The students are equally responsible for practicing social distancing rules.

Read the original article here: https://www.paradigmshift.com.pk/pakistan-lockdown/
 

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