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Chinese PLA flying tuk tuk, gyrocopter, mass produced and employed

beijingwalker

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Chinese PLA flying tuk tuk, gyrocopter, mass produced and employed​

The report says it only needs 2 days to learn how to fly this machine, it sounds like learning to operate it is easier than learning how to drive a car. Almost like today's form of cavalry, onely flying vehicles replaced horses, they are still infantry equipments.

Reported cost of each craft is 30,000 Yuan (4,480$)

 
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beijingwalker

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Since this machine is so cheap to make and the range is over 600 kilometers, maybe China can make half a million of them and secretly send tens of thousands of PLA troop over to Taiwan in one hour at one moonless night.

RW-MAP-CHINA-INVASION-OF-TAIWAN-1.jpg
 

khansaheeb

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Chinese PLA flying tuk tuk, gyrocopter, mass produced and employed​

The report says it only needs 2 days to learn how to fly this machine, it sounds like learning to operate it is easier than learning how to drive a car. Almost like today's form of cavalry, onely flying vehicles replaced horses, they are still infantry equipments.

Reported cost of each craft is 30,000 Yuan (4,480$)

They look very flimsy, how will they perform in poor weather?
 

Sineva

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It's all about low cost, if an equipment cost not much more than your rifle and can fly, why not have it.
Exactly,its basically a flying atv,and I`ve seen plenty of those equipped with atgm firing posts for shoot and scoot attacks.
I`d say that pretty much anything that you can mount on a small to mid sized ucav you can mount on one these.
FYWZNWdXwAAM_A-.jpg

Plus they require very little in the way of support infrastructure,ie runways,and relatively little in terms of logistics.
 

lcloo

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These are for special forces raids on enemy's strategic positions, especially at night. They kept on flying on safe descinding rates with engines switched off, thus maintaining silence approach to enemy positions across Taiwan straits and surrounding small islands, to achieve surprise attacks, commando style.

Also good for infiltration by recon and sabotage troops.
 

dbc

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If you spend a couple of minutes to watch this video you should've learned that radar evasion is one of the major feats of those crafts.

lol...nothing metal with a rotor is radar evading. Especially a million of these things flying over the Taiwan strait.
 

MH.Yang

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The price of robot dog is getting lower and lower.
I found that some robot dogs sell for only 8088 CNY ($1200) and can carry 50kg, it can carry a heavy machine gun and two or three hundred bullets.

I think robot dogs, mechanical exoskeletons, flying tuk tuk and other equipment can be popularized to every soldier. It's very cheap and practical.

IMG_20211114_132448.jpg


 

beijingwalker

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The price of robot dog is getting lower and lower.
I found that some robot dogs sell for only 8088 CNY ($1200) and can carry 50kg, it can carry a heavy machine gun and two or three hundred bullets.

I think robot dogs, mechanical exoskeletons, flying tuk tuk and other equipment can be popularized to every soldier. It's very cheap and practical.

China's greatest strenth is the capability to mass produce everything and whatever you can make, China can make it cheaper.
 

beijingwalker

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China Shows Off Gyrocopters Armed With Anti-Tank Missiles, could be deployed along the Sino-Indian border to combat Indian tanks and other vehicles​

In the footage, we see a two-seat gyrocopter loaded out with four anti-tank guided missiles (ATGMs,) two on each of the aircraft’s underside hardpoint extensions. The gyrocopter also appears to be equipped with a small sensor turret under its nose, which could be used to find targets, aim and guide the missiles (depending on their guidance method), and provide for more general surveillance and reconnaissance type tasks. The footage also depicts a fleet of unarmed gyrocopters performing training exercises and stunts.

Taken at face value, the addition of ATGMs and a sensor turret marks an important upgrade to the PLA's gyrocopters in terms of munitions – the latest image we have seen of these aircraft shows one boasting small precision-guided bombs, without a sensor ball.

The two-manned gyrocopter has a range of around 250 miles and boasts a maximum gross weight of around 1,235 pounds. Unlike helicopters, which rely on a dedicated motor to power their rotors, gyrocopters fly by means of autorotation. A rear-facing pusher engine powers a propeller. The thrust and motion from this rearward prop propel the aircraft’s main blades.

Gyrocopters are slow but nimble. These aircraft can perform very short takeoffs and land with very high approach angles in small areas. They are very easily concealed, making them easy to transport for all sorts of covert reconnaissance missions, as well as for border patrols and search and rescue operations. Their ability to travel low and slow and their small radar and thermal signatures makes them hard to detect, as well.

While we've seen images of PLA gyrocopters performing military exercises, notably in Tibet last year, it remains unclear precisely how the PLA would use gyrocopters fitted with ATGMs and sensor balls. The Twitter user @OsintTv argues that PLA spokespeople in the CCTV7 video revealed that they could be deployed along the Sino-Indian border to combat Indian tanks and other vehicles. The border between the two countries remains a site of heightened tension, which readers can learn more about here and here.

In the video, a rough translation describes how the armed gyrocopters are intended to support ground forces and hunt and kill tanks. It's also noted that some measures have been taken to quiet the aircraft. In addition, a good point is made in that training pilots to fly gyrocopters is relatively easy and their logistical footprint is absolutely tiny, which is a big benefit for austere operations.

If deployed along the Sino-Indian border, facing down Indian tank regiments, the aircraft could be vulnerable to the sorts of air defenses that accompany mobile units and ground troops during a high-end conflict. The degradation in performance of these aircraft in a high-altitude combat environment is also worth considering.

But as a very low-cost patrol and surveillance aircraft with contingent light attack capabilities that pretty much anyone can be taught to fly and maintain, it might make some sense.

Regardless, it is just another quirky facet of a growing PLA that includes everything from very high-end aerial capabilities like stealthy fighters all the way down to little autogyros with missiles slapped on their sides.

 

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