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GriffinsRule

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This is what the British Parliament authorized for the defense of Falkland Islands. 4 RAF Typhoons against 12 JF-17 is a matter of concern.

UK military assets UK military assets are drawn from all three services and include infantry and specialist troops, air defence assets, a maritime patrol capability and RAF Typhoon aircraft. The British Forces South Atlantic Islands (BFSAI) is based at Mount Pleasant Complex, 35 miles (56km) from the capital, Stanley. It consists of approximately 1,300 Service personnel plus around 50 MOD civil servants.
As of February 2012 assets include: • Approximately 1300 personnel • Four Typhoon fast-jet aircraft • VC-10 tanker aircraft • Hercules C-130 aircraft • Rapier surface-to-air missiles • Frigate or Destroyer (currently Type 23 frigate HMS Montrose to be replaced by Type 45 destroyer HMS Dauntless) • Royal Fleet Auxiliary Gold Rover • HMS Clyde permanently stationed in the region as Falklands Patrol • Infantry company currently from 2 Scots The RAF currently has four Typhoon fast-jet aircraft based at Mount Pleasant Airfield to provide air defence of the islands; one VC-10 tanker aircraft for air-to-air refuelling; and one Hercules C-130 aircraft providing airborne maritime patrol capability, including fisheries patrolling. The C130 can also be used for air transport or medical evacuation if required. Two Sea King helicopters are available for search and rescue coverage; while the RAF regiment provides a Rapier Squadron of surface-to-air missiles. In addition, two Sikorski S61 helicopters, operated by British International, are based at Mount Pleasant for the routine movement of personnel and freight. Air traffic control, fire and meteorological services are also present. Remotely deployed early warning radars also provide an air defence framework.7 Atlantic Patrol Task (South), APT(S), is the standing naval commitment to provide either a destroyer or a frigate and an RFA support vessel to the South Atlantic and the West African region. The vessel is present in the Falkland Islands area for the majority of the year, including through the southern winter, and is at a maximum of 14 days notice from the islands for the remainder of the year. The current APTS vessel is the Type 23 frigate HMS Montrose, supported by RFA tanker Gold Rover8 . HMS Montrose began her 6½ month deployment in October 20119 . She is to be replaced by Type 45 destroyer HMS Dauntless in 5 “Duke of Cambridge to deploy to Falklands”, Defence News, 10 November 2011 [online] (accessed 11 January 2012) 6 MoD email, 17 January 2012 7 More information on the RAF deployment is available on its website 8 “RFA Black Rover returns from 18 month deployment”, Defence News, 29 September 2011 9 “Montrose begins six month stint in South Atlantic”, Royal Navy News, 25 October 2011 4 spring 201210. Type 42 destroyer HMS Edinburgh was on patrol prior to HMS Montrose for much of 2011. In addition, HMS Clyde11 is permanently stationed in the region as the Falkland Islands Patrol Vessel. The ship’s company rotates every six months. A nuclear-powered attack submarine also supplements Atlantic Patrol Task South, on occasion. A Naval Engineering unit supports naval assets in the region. HMS Protector deployed to the Antarctic and South Atlantic in January 2012 to take up duties as the Ice Patrol Ship. HMS Protector is on loan from Norway and replaces the ice patrol ship HMS Endurance, in dock since 2008 with damage sustained by flooding.12 13 The Falkland Islands Reinforcement Infantry company rotates on a regular basis. A number of joint units also support Armed Forces personnel and assets based in the Falkland Islands, including: • Falkland Islands Joint Logistics Unit • Falkland Islands Support Unit • Joint Communications Unit Falkland Islands • Joint Services Provost and Security Unit • Joint Services signals Unit. The Falkland Islands Defence Force provides local support to British military personnel. Funded by the Falkland Islands Government, the Defence Force is recognised as a skilled and effective Territorial Army unit, not only forming an integral part of the Islands’ defence operation, but also carrying out search and rescue operations. The MoD provides a brief introduction to the Falkland Islands for the service community, including information on weather and flying time (18 hours).
4 Eurofighters should hold up pretty well against 12 JF-17s given the early warning as well as electronic warfare advantage and better training of the RAF. And in case of a need, those 4 can be easily supplemented with additional units. A cursory look at the RAF base you can count 16 HAS on the base with multiple runways so the Brits will do just fine. That is not even counting the air defence provided by the ships. Even if there were just 2 additional Eurofighters, Id say they would have an edge and a first shoot capability. So these are not a threat to the Brits and are not meant to be either.
 

Song Hong

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This is a big force for a small village. A lot of money for taxpayer.

Onboarding JF17 may see a further step up in deployment in Falkland. UK is draining her coffer.


This is what the British Parliament authorized for the defense of Falkland Islands. 4 RAF Typhoons against 12 JF-17 is a matter of concern.

UK military assets UK military assets are drawn from all three services and include infantry and specialist troops, air defence assets, a maritime patrol capability and RAF Typhoon aircraft. The British Forces South Atlantic Islands (BFSAI) is based at Mount Pleasant Complex, 35 miles (56km) from the capital, Stanley. It consists of approximately 1,300 Service personnel plus around 50 MOD civil servants.
As of February 2012 assets include: • Approximately 1300 personnel • Four Typhoon fast-jet aircraft • VC-10 tanker aircraft • Hercules C-130 aircraft • Rapier surface-to-air missiles • Frigate or Destroyer (currently Type 23 frigate HMS Montrose to be replaced by Type 45 destroyer HMS Dauntless) • Royal Fleet Auxiliary Gold Rover • HMS Clyde permanently stationed in the region as Falklands Patrol • Infantry company currently from 2 Scots The RAF currently has four Typhoon fast-jet aircraft based at Mount Pleasant Airfield to provide air defence of the islands; one VC-10 tanker aircraft for air-to-air refuelling; and one Hercules C-130 aircraft providing airborne maritime patrol capability, including fisheries patrolling. The C130 can also be used for air transport or medical evacuation if required. Two Sea King helicopters are available for search and rescue coverage; while the RAF regiment provides a Rapier Squadron of surface-to-air missiles. In addition, two Sikorski S61 helicopters, operated by British International, are based at Mount Pleasant for the routine movement of personnel and freight. Air traffic control, fire and meteorological services are also present. Remotely deployed early warning radars also provide an air defence framework.7 Atlantic Patrol Task (South), APT(S), is the standing naval commitment to provide either a destroyer or a frigate and an RFA support vessel to the South Atlantic and the West African region. The vessel is present in the Falkland Islands area for the majority of the year, including through the southern winter, and is at a maximum of 14 days notice from the islands for the remainder of the year. The current APTS vessel is the Type 23 frigate HMS Montrose, supported by RFA tanker Gold Rover8 . HMS Montrose began her 6½ month deployment in October 20119 . She is to be replaced by Type 45 destroyer HMS Dauntless in 5 “Duke of Cambridge to deploy to Falklands”, Defence News, 10 November 2011 [online] (accessed 11 January 2012) 6 MoD email, 17 January 2012 7 More information on the RAF deployment is available on its website 8 “RFA Black Rover returns from 18 month deployment”, Defence News, 29 September 2011 9 “Montrose begins six month stint in South Atlantic”, Royal Navy News, 25 October 2011 4 spring 201210. Type 42 destroyer HMS Edinburgh was on patrol prior to HMS Montrose for much of 2011. In addition, HMS Clyde11 is permanently stationed in the region as the Falkland Islands Patrol Vessel. The ship’s company rotates every six months. A nuclear-powered attack submarine also supplements Atlantic Patrol Task South, on occasion. A Naval Engineering unit supports naval assets in the region. HMS Protector deployed to the Antarctic and South Atlantic in January 2012 to take up duties as the Ice Patrol Ship. HMS Protector is on loan from Norway and replaces the ice patrol ship HMS Endurance, in dock since 2008 with damage sustained by flooding.12 13 The Falkland Islands Reinforcement Infantry company rotates on a regular basis. A number of joint units also support Armed Forces personnel and assets based in the Falkland Islands, including: • Falkland Islands Joint Logistics Unit • Falkland Islands Support Unit • Joint Communications Unit Falkland Islands • Joint Services Provost and Security Unit • Joint Services signals Unit. The Falkland Islands Defence Force provides local support to British military personnel. Funded by the Falkland Islands Government, the Defence Force is recognised as a skilled and effective Territorial Army unit, not only forming an integral part of the Islands’ defence operation, but also carrying out search and rescue operations. The MoD provides a brief introduction to the Falkland Islands for the service community, including information on weather and flying time (18 hours).
 

Char

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To deal with the West, we can only use the language they understand. I think China can provide more weapons, and more importantly, China will guarantee the maintenance and supply of weapons during the war.
 

Song Hong

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Falkland is nothing, rather than having a blown out proportion military presence.

There is a way to harass the 4 RAF typhoons. Argentina air force can take turns carry out a few daily sortie close to Falkland and these pilots will be deprive of sleep.

1620438475052.png
 

Beast

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Falkland is nothing, rather than having a blown out proportion military presence.

There is a way to harass the 4 RAF typhoons. Argentina air force can take turns carry out a few daily sortie close to Falkland and these pilots will be deprive of sleep.

View attachment 741687
3 Jf-17 per group and attack from 4 different direction. No way 4 typhoon can hold it up
 

mike2000 is back

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Even that would result in all 70+ JF-17s being shot down with a handful of F-35Bs at most being lost in return.

UK will soon have the capability to lay waste to Argentine coastal cities when the 2 carriers are fully inducted by 2025.

Argentine had its one chance to capture the Falkland by force in 1982 and got beaten back when they were stronger and UK was weaker than now in terms of expeditionary firepower.
Don't forget that Our nuclear subs are still being churned out at a faster rate. Our advanced state of the art fifth astute nuclear submarine was launched just 2 weeks ago and more is to follow and being built.
The carrier strike group we have or will have in a year or two will be the most potent outside the U.S. Many people forget that. To think Argentina can threaten the UK is simply living in fantasy world. As i said before: WE ARE NOT IN THE SAME LEAGUE AT ALL. Argentina should compete with its developing countries peers and those in South America, not the UK.


BAE Systems launches fifth state-of-the-art Astute class attack submarine
21 Apr 2021
Professional Engineering
BAE Systems launched the Anson Astute class submarine into the water (Credit: BAE Systems)BAE Systems launched the Anson Astute class submarine into the water (Credit: BAE Systems)

The Royal Navy’s fifth Astute class attack submarine has entered the water for the first time.
BAE Systems launched Anson, the fifth of seven Astutes being built for the Navy, from its site in Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria, earlier today (21 April).

1620470549626.png

The Astute class boats are the largest and most advanced attack submarines ever built for the Navy. Measuring 97m long, the boats can circumnavigate the globe submerged and produce their own oxygen and drinking water.

Anson will now begin the next phase of its test and commissioning programme, before leaving Barrow for sea trials with the Navy next year.

The first four submarines in the class – HMS Astute, HMS Ambush, HMS Artful and HMS Audacious – have been handed over to the Navy, with a further two under construction in Barrow.

Steve Timms, managing director of BAE Systems’ Submarines, said: “The launch marks an important milestone in the Astute programme, and seeing Anson enter the water at such an advanced state is a tangible demonstration of everyone's hard work over the years.

“Designing and building nuclear-powered submarines is a national endeavour and days like this bring a huge sense of pride for our workforce, our partners in the submarine enterprise and our UK supply chain, not to mention our communities.

"We now look forward to a successful test and commissioning phase and working alongside Anson's crew to prepare the submarine for operations with the Royal Navy."
1620470243138.png

Agamemnon will be the sixth of seven nuclear-powered attack submarines designed and manufactured at BAE’s site in Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria.

Working alongside the Submarine Delivery Agency and Rolls-Royce, BAE Systems is also a member of the Dreadnought Alliance, helping to deliver the UK's next class of nuclear deterrent submarines. Two of the four submarines are under construction, with the first due to enter service in the early 2030s.

Approximately 10,000 people work on the Dreadnought and Astute programmes at the Barrow site. BAE Systems said it expects to recruit more than 200 graduates and 1,500 apprentices over the next five years.

BAE Systems launches fifth state-of-the-art Astute class attack submarine (imeche.org)
 

UKBengali

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Don't forget that Our nuclear subs are still being churned out at a faster rate. Our advanced state of the art fifth astute nuclear submarine was launched just 2 weeks ago and more is to follow and being built.
The carrier strike group we have or will have in a year or two will be the most potent outside the U.S. Many people forget that. To think Argentina can threaten the UK is simply living in fantasy world. As i said before: WE ARE NOT IN THE SAME LEAGUE AT ALL. Argentina should compete with its developing countries peers and those in South America, not the UK.


BAE Systems launches fifth state-of-the-art Astute class attack submarine
21 Apr 2021
Professional Engineering
BAE Systems launched the Anson Astute class submarine into the water (Credit: BAE Systems)BAE Systems launched the Anson Astute class submarine into the water (Credit: BAE Systems)

The Royal Navy’s fifth Astute class attack submarine has entered the water for the first time. View attachment 741772
BAE Systems launched Anson, the fifth of seven Astutes being built for the Navy, from its site in Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria, earlier today (21 April).
The Astute class boats are the largest and most advanced attack submarines ever built for the Navy. Measuring 97m long, the boats can circumnavigate the globe submerged and produce their own oxygen and drinking water.

Anson will now begin the next phase of its test and commissioning programme, before leaving Barrow for sea trials with the Navy next year.

The first four submarines in the class – HMS Astute, HMS Ambush, HMS Artful and HMS Audacious – have been handed over to the Navy, with a further two under construction in Barrow.

Steve Timms, managing director of BAE Systems’ Submarines, said: “The launch marks an important milestone in the Astute programme, and seeing Anson enter the water at such an advanced state is a tangible demonstration of everyone's hard work over the years.

“Designing and building nuclear-powered submarines is a national endeavour and days like this bring a huge sense of pride for our workforce, our partners in the submarine enterprise and our UK supply chain, not to mention our communities.

"We now look forward to a successful test and commissioning phase and working alongside Anson's crew to prepare the submarine for operations with the Royal Navy."
View attachment 741772
Agamemnon will be the sixth of seven nuclear-powered attack submarines designed and manufactured at BAE’s site in Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria.

Working alongside the Submarine Delivery Agency and Rolls-Royce, BAE Systems is also a member of the Dreadnought Alliance, helping to deliver the UK's next class of nuclear deterrent submarines. Two of the four submarines are under construction, with the first due to enter service in the early 2030s.

Approximately 10,000 people work on the Dreadnought and Astute programmes at the Barrow site. BAE Systems said it expects to recruit more than 200 graduates and 1,500 apprentices over the next five years.

BAE Systems launches fifth state-of-the-art Astute class attack submarine (imeche.org)



I would like the UK to DOUBLE the size of the RN over the next 1-2 decades. The money can come from taking the new 0.5% down to 0.25% of GDP spent on "overseas aid", most of which gets wasted and does not help the world's very poor. The reduced money can be more effectively targeted and spent.

4 QE Carriers, 12 Type-45 destroyers, 16 Type-26 frigates, 14 Astute SSNs. That is the RN that the UK needs to build to be fully equipped for this new era but do we have the visionary and bold politicians that are prepared to adjust to a new reality where UK and its allies will have to share the world with the likes of China etc?
 

My-Analogous

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Rome wasn't built in a day and neither was China's Rise. This is just the beginning for the Argentinian air force. Its a revival and foundations for something greater in the years to come. It is obvious a few JF17s are no match for one of the premier military nations in the world (UK) but small steps towards the right direction should be applauded.
It is not few JF17. No country is idiot that much to talk about 17 fighter plane production line. They seriously in need of Atleast 100 frames or more
 

mike2000 is back

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I would like the UK to DOUBLE the size of the RN over the next 1-2 decades. The money can come from taking the new 0.5% down to 0.25% of GDP spent on "overseas aid", most of which gets wasted and does not help the world's very poor. The reduced money can be more effectively targeted and spent.

4 QE Carriers, 12 Type-45 destroyers, 16 Type-26 frigates, 14 Astute SSNs. That is the RN that the UK needs to build to be fully equipped for this new era but do we have the visionary and bold politicians that are prepared to adjust to a new reality where UK and its allies will have to share the world with the likes of China etc?
Yes i agree. Our politicians and public have been too laid back this past decades. I guess we have gotten complacent mostly because we don't face any more real threat to our immediate neighbourhood/territory unlike during the first and second world war and then during the cold war when the soviet threat loomed large in our neighbourhood/territory and helped keep us on our toes thereby necessitating huge investment of investment in our armed forces/navy. However, now it's difficult to justify building a very large navy(the likes you talk about) and military, since we don't face any real immediate threat per se(but we seem to forget that the best way to maintain peace is to have a credible deterrent). So our public will be against investing a larger amount and resources to build such a large force. Its not a lack of capabilities, since we got all the Industrial/manufacturing/technical/technological capabilities and our defence companies are among the largest and most advanced on the globe, so its more about political will, and public complacency/apathy towards such a move.

This is why i think getting out of the E.U wasn't such a bad thing actually. I guess it will help shake up the complacency we have had for so long, and force our politicians to get other pending defence projects going. In this regard BREXIT is the best guarantee we could ask for in regards to our 5th generation fighter Tempest which is now being developed. This is one of the only reason I'm sure we will go full force ahead with this program, since we have now realise we cant rely on E.U partners that much. So there is always a good news from a bad news i guess. lol


£2bn investment to power Tempest fighter jet’s next phase
30 April 2021 • In News
£2bn investment to power Tempest fighter jet’s next phase

Image: BAE Systems
More than £2 billion will be invested in the Tempest fighter jet programme to power the next phase of the new combat air system.
The Integrated Review and Defence Command Paper released by the government set out the importance of the programme to global security and UK prosperity, which is why the UK will invest over the next four years to move into the next phase to design and deliver the next-generation system.
The work will sustain and support a sector which already generates £6 billion a year and employs over 46,000 people across the UK.
The sector and the broader UK defence industry is set to be boosted by the new Defence Industrial and Security Strategy, which will ensure that the UK retains a competitive, innovative and world-class defence and security industry.

Speaking at RUSI’s Combat Air Power conference, defence minister Jeremy Quin said: “As our recently published Integrated Review underlined, technology and the threats we are facing have moved on. In the intervening decades, the likes of Russia and China have studied our strengths in the air and begun developing the capabilities to not only counter but surpass us. If we fail to outmatch these targets and they continue at this pace, we could find ourselves locked out of the skies. The freedom of the air cannot be taken for granted.”

The MoD’s director of Future Combat Air, Richard Berthon, said: “Combat air is vital to the protection of the UK and our contribution to global security. The Integrated Review shows the UK’s commitment to staying at the cutting edge of future Combat Air technologies.

“We are working closely with industry and international partners to launch the next phase of delivering the Tempest concept. This is an exciting milestone as we seize the opportunities created by digital design and delivery to revolutionise combat air delivery and preserve our operational advantage for decades to come.”

Elements of Tempest will connect to provide a combat air system for the rest of the 21st century. A core aircraft will likely form one element of a network of capabilities which could include long-range weapons, space-based sensors and supporting uncrewed aircraft.

The UK is now launching the concept and assessment phase to design and deliver Tempest with its partners – this will accelerate analysis and set out how to deliver the project. The programme is targeting Initial Operating Capability from 2035 so that, over time, the system can replace Typhoon as it reaches the end of its service life.

£2bn investment to power Tempest fighter jet’s next phase (pesmedia.com)



It's also a good thing that Italy and Sweden have come under our wing to develop this new fighter. Hopefully more countries will come under our wing to carry on this program(excluding France and Germany though.:D:nono: ) and make it a truly global one with presence around the world.


Talking about propulsion and avionics, we recently reported about the technologies in these fields that are being developed for Tempest:

Leonardo, which is the project lead for electronics, is developing a new radar technology called Multi-Function Radar Frequency System. The new sensor will reportedly collect and process 10’000 times more data than existing systems, or “equivalent to the internet traffic of a large city every second”, providing the operators with a clear view of the battlespace and of potential targets. According to the company, complete sub-systems have already been built and successfully tested, paving the way eventually to future airborne testing.
BAE Systems if working on another revolutionary concept, the “wearable cockpit”. In this case, the cockpit as we know it, full of switches, gauges and screens, becomes completely digital and all physical controls are replaced by Augmented and Virtual Reality systems. The new cockpit would be projected inside the pilot’s helmet and completely customizable according to the pilot’s preference and mission’s needs.
As human-AI teaming, a virtual copilot is being developed to interact with the pilot and provide support during the flight. “Psycho-physiological” technologies are also being trialed to study the operator’s physical and cognitive processes to better understand increasing exertion, stress, workload and fatigue. According to the company, some of these technologies are being tested controlled test flight conditions aboard the Typhoon to inform further development. MBDA UK is also working on the wearable cockpit concept to integrate weapons systems information and operations.
1620477314895.png

Rolls-Royce is working on the advanced combustion system technology that will power Tempest. The next-generation system is being designed to be hotter than previous ones to increase the efficiency of the engine, its range and speed, while reducing carbon dioxide emissions. Together with the higher-temperature combustion, there will be a new thermal management system that will use the turbine as a heat sink to recycle thermal energy, removing the need for overboard venting and improving the efficiency, and an increased electrical power production, reportedly in the order of one megawatt, that will be used to power all the aircraft’s subsystems.

This follows the assessment by Rolls Royce that future fighter aircraft will have unprecedented levels of electrical power demand and thermal load that need to be managed accordingly to maintain the airframe’s low observability. Being more specific, the company stated that they will integrate an Electrical Embedded Starter Generator that will function both as an APU and as an electrical generator after the engine is spooled up.
Italy, United Kingdom And Sweden Sign Tempest FCAS Cooperation Memorandum Of Understanding - The Aviationist
 
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Beast

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yes i agree. Our politicians and public have been too laid back this past decades.
What threat are you talking about? A declining Russia with aging military and declining economy. And then sending a fleet to SCS to try project power to protect what? Hong Kong?

The UK politician are practical, with brexit and a shrinking UK economy. It is the correct decision to cut down on defense budget. We got UK nationalist beating the drum of increasing UK military expenditures against imaginary threat which never threaten UK mainland.

Its a further sight UK will be worst off in coming decades. UK shall spend the money more on education ,upgrade workforce skill and strengthen commercial industries in anticipation of more competition in coming times.
 

UKBengali

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Yes i agree. Our politicians and public have been too laid back this past decades. I guess we have gotten complacent mostly because we don't face any more real threat to our immediate neighbourhood/territory unlike during the first and second world war and then during the cold war when the soviet threat loomed large in our neighbourhood/territory and helped keep us on our toes thereby necessitating huge investment of investment in our armed forces/navy. However, now it's difficult to justify building a very large navy(the likes you talk about) and military, since we don't face any real immediate threat per se(but we seem to forget that the best way to maintain peace is to have a credible deterrent). So our public will be against investing a larger amount and resources to build such a large force. Its not a lack of capabilities, since we got all the Industrial/manufacturing/technical/technological capabilities and our defence companies are among the largest and most advanced on the globe, so its more about political will, and public complacency/apathy towards such a move.

This is why i think getting out of the E.U wasn't such a bad thing actually. I guess it will help shake up the complacency we have had for so long, and force our politicians to get other pending defence projects going. In this regard BREXIT is the best guarantee we could ask for in regards to our 5th generation fighter Tempest which is now being developed. This is one of the only reason I'm sure we will go full force ahead with this program, since we have now realise we cant rely on E.U partners that much. So there is always a good news from a bad news i guess. lol


£2bn investment to power Tempest fighter jet’s next phase
30 April 2021 • In News
£2bn investment to power Tempest fighter jet’s next phase

Image: BAE Systems
More than £2 billion will be invested in the Tempest fighter jet programme to power the next phase of the new combat air system.
The Integrated Review and Defence Command Paper released by the government set out the importance of the programme to global security and UK prosperity, which is why the UK will invest over the next four years to move into the next phase to design and deliver the next-generation system.
The work will sustain and support a sector which already generates £6 billion a year and employs over 46,000 people across the UK.
The sector and the broader UK defence industry is set to be boosted by the new Defence Industrial and Security Strategy, which will ensure that the UK retains a competitive, innovative and world-class defence and security industry.

Speaking at RUSI’s Combat Air Power conference, defence minister Jeremy Quin said: “As our recently published Integrated Review underlined, technology and the threats we are facing have moved on. In the intervening decades, the likes of Russia and China have studied our strengths in the air and begun developing the capabilities to not only counter but surpass us. If we fail to outmatch these targets and they continue at this pace, we could find ourselves locked out of the skies. The freedom of the air cannot be taken for granted.”

The MoD’s director of Future Combat Air, Richard Berthon, said: “Combat air is vital to the protection of the UK and our contribution to global security. The Integrated Review shows the UK’s commitment to staying at the cutting edge of future Combat Air technologies.

“We are working closely with industry and international partners to launch the next phase of delivering the Tempest concept. This is an exciting milestone as we seize the opportunities created by digital design and delivery to revolutionise combat air delivery and preserve our operational advantage for decades to come.”

Elements of Tempest will connect to provide a combat air system for the rest of the 21st century. A core aircraft will likely form one element of a network of capabilities which could include long-range weapons, space-based sensors and supporting uncrewed aircraft.

The UK is now launching the concept and assessment phase to design and deliver Tempest with its partners – this will accelerate analysis and set out how to deliver the project. The programme is targeting Initial Operating Capability from 2035 so that, over time, the system can replace Typhoon as it reaches the end of its service life.

£2bn investment to power Tempest fighter jet’s next phase (pesmedia.com)



It's also a good thing that Italy and Sweden have come under our wing to develop this new fighter. Hopefully more countries will come under our wing to carry on this program(excluding France and Germany though.:D:nono: ) and make it a truly global one with presence around the world.


Talking about propulsion and avionics, we recently reported about the technologies in these fields that are being developed for Tempest:


View attachment 741789


Italy, United Kingdom And Sweden Sign Tempest FCAS Cooperation Memorandum Of Understanding - The Aviationist

Like I say it will not cost UK taxpayers like us a single penny more as the vast waste of money on "overseas aid" will be reduced and redirected to the RN.

I think if the politicians explained to the public on why the RN needs to be expanded as the world becomes more unstable with the rise of China, and so the UK as an island nation needs a very powerful Navy to keep its sea lanes of trade open, then the public will support it.

The British Army and RAF can be kept at their current levels and just expanding the RN like I suggest will create more demand for weapons like naval Tempest and so rather than 100 on 2 carriers, 200 will be required on 4 carriers. With economies of scale UK may need to spend only 80% more on the RN to be able to double its size.

Maybe it is just me and others who are into military affairs but it should be a no-brainer for so many reasons to make the RN a lot larger than it is now. Just being the best in W Europe is not enough when you have China that brazenly rips up the Hong Kong 50 year autonomy agreement - not that I think that the UK even with a much more powerful RN could have done anything about it.

It will likely not happen unless there is something like the Falklands soon but it is the right thing to do for the UK.
What threat are you talking about? A declining Russia with aging military and declining economy. And then sending a fleet to SCS to try project power to protect what? Hong Kong?

The UK politician are practical, with brexit and a shrinking UK economy. It is the correct decision to cut down on defense budget. We got UK nationalist beating the drum of increasing UK military expenditures against imaginary threat which never threaten UK mainland.

Its a further sight UK will be worst off in coming decades. UK shall spend the money more on education ,upgrade workforce skill and strengthen commercial industries in anticipation of more competition in coming times.


See my above post as it will actually make UK richer by keeping more money in UK economy. UK can build all weapons systems.
 
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Beast

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See my above post as it will actually make UK richer by keeping more money in UK economy. UK can build all weapons systems.
You mean spending money wisely on UK human resource and upgrade of British workforce skill is waste of money? Did I hear it wrongly?

UK now is just trying to boast its ego by spending more money on area unnecessary.
 

UKBengali

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You mean spending money wisely on UK human resource and upgrade of British workforce skill is waste of money? Did I hear it wrongly?

If i was not clear, my suggestion was to permanently reduce the money the UK spends on "overseas aid" from 0.7 to 0.25% of GDP.

The savings can be spent on doubling the size of the UK Navy(RN).

This would actually make the UK richer as then this extra money would be circulating in the UK economy as the UK builds everything for its Navy anyway like aircraft carriers, destroyers, frigates and SSNs.

It will not cost UK taxpayers any more money at all.
 

FuturePAF

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Should one day the WS-19 reach its goal of 25,000 lb max thrust, and be cleared for export, a much more potent form or stealth redesign of the JF-17 could see export success for decades to come.

Very interested to see if it will fly with a Chinese or Russian engine.
 

PakFactor

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Kiya baat hy, but it takes one missile in a saturated attack to slip through defenses.
True, the Argentinian Air Force would have to rely mostly on stand of weapons and prevent as much attrition on its forces as much possible. They'll need a stealth competent down the road in terms of cruise missile or something with very low RCS.
 

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