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China's Silicon Valley to expand

Discussion in 'China & Far East' started by TaiShang, Aug 9, 2014.

  1. TaiShang

    TaiShang ELITE MEMBER

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    China's "silicon valley" to expand
    Editor: Zhang Jingya Xinhua

    TIANJIN, Aug. 8 (Xinhua) -- Zhongguancun, China's iconic technology park, is to expand out of the capital under the coordinated development initiative for Beijing, Tianjin and Hebei.

    A recent agreement between Beijing and Tianjin should mean construction of the Binhai-Zhongguancun Science and Technology Park in Tianjin Binhai New Area, a special economic development zone, can get underway. The park will combine Zhongguancun's innovation drive and Binhai New Area's policy priority. Another Zhongguancun science and technology park is being considered in Qinhuangdao, a port city in Hebei Province.

    Zhongguancun was China's first high-tech park. Over the past 20 years, nearly 20,000 enterprises have registered there, with total revenue of 2.5 trillion yuan (406 billion U.S. dollars) last year.

    According to the agreement signed on Wednesday, the two metropolis will also strengthen cooperation in 30 key fields such as transport and environment.

    In February, Chinese President Xi Jinping called on Beijing, Tianjin and Hebei to coordinate their development in tackling smog and other development issues together.
     
  2. cirr

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    Legend to build on 'China's Silicon Valley'

    Updated: 2014-12-23 07:20

    By Cheng Yingqi(HK Edition)

    f04da2db11221602edfa06.jpg


    Legend Holdings Ltd - the parent company of Hong Kong-listed Lenovo Group Ltd - plans to play a bigger role in the central government's ambitious plan to duplicate Zhongguancun across the country by taking on more risky ventures.

    "Legend Holdings started from Zhongguancun, and we had witnessed many enterprises starting from scratch. So I feel it's our obligation to help small- and medium-sized businesses when we are in a position to do so," said Liu Chuanzhi, founder and honorary chairman of Lenovo Group and chairman of Legend Holdings. "Legend Holdings and our incubator investment 'Legend Star' should play a bigger role in the duplication of Zhongguancun across China," he said.

    Located in Beijing's Haidian district and called "China's Silicon Valley", Zhongguancun occupies an area of about 480 square kilometers and is the most intensive scientific, education and talent base in the country, with numerous high-tech companies, colleges, scientific institutions and State-level laboratories.

    At a State Council executive meeting earlier this month, Premier Li Keqiang revealed a plan to extend six policies that have been piloted in Zhongguancun to encourage business innovation.

    Legend Holdings started in the reception office of the Institute of Computing Technology Chinese Academy of Sciences (located in the central area in Zhongguancun) in 1984 with only 11 staff members.

    By late last year, the company had created six subsidiary companies covering a wide range of businesses, including information technology, real estate development, financial services and agriculture.

    Lenovo Group - China's largest maker of personal computers - is one of the affiliated companies.

    To share its experience with startup companies, Legend launched an incubator project named Legend Star in 2008.

    The project's aim was to help research fellows at colleges and institutes transfer their sci-tech research results into products and business by attending training sessions and receiving angel investment from Legend Star.

    Shenzhen-based game enterprise iDreamSky Technology Ltd, which launched an initial public offering in the Nasdaq Global Select Market in August, received an 8-million-yuan ($1.3-million) angel investment from Legend Star in 2010, when the company was still an obscure outsourced game producer.

    "In 2010, Apple Inc unveiled its smartphone iPhone 4, which I believe, signaled a revolution in wireless hardware," said Wang Mingyao, executive director of Legend Star.

    Since then, Wang has kept looking for investment opportunities for mobile games and applications, and he was impressed by the high production value of iDreamSky.

    Besides investments, Legend Star guided iDreamSky's development strategy in its infancy by supporting its game platform development and streamlining the company's management structure.

    "We did have competitors in our iDreamSky venture. However, we invested 8 million yuan at one swoop, while other investors were only willing to put in no more than 1 million yuan on a company that was just capable of providing outsourcing services back then," Wang recalled.

    Legend Star has so far incubated nine listed companies in the agriculture, healthcare, TMT (technology, media, and telecom) and advanced manufacturing sectors.

    In the next five years, Legend Holdings plans to increase investments in Legend Star by 600 million yuan and raise funding to 1 billion yuan.

    Legend Star, however, is only the tip of the iceberg of Zhongguancun's prosperous development. From 2012 to 2013, the value of public companies at Zhongguancun rose by 51 percent to 2.1 trillion yuan - equivalent to the annual GDP of Anhui province.

    Zhongguancun's success story has lured many venture investors - about 9,000 startup businesses have opened up there so far this year, attracting 52.8-percent angel investment from across China, according to the central government's official website.

    "New challenges have arisen in recent years as the government strengthens national policy support for the innovation business. The supply for our major services - free training and angel investment - was rather limited between 2008 and 2012, while more incubators have sprung up since 2013, creating greater competition in incubating services," said Lu Gang, Legend Star's executive vice-general manager and executive director.

    Since 2012, Legend Star has cooperated with local governments in Suzhou, Tianjin and Shanghai to build incubator bases - to duplicate the development pattern of Zhongguancun.

    Liu believes that in-depth cooperation with colleges and research institutions is the most important link in response to the rapidly changing business environment.

    "Take Zhongguancun for example. Here we have Tsinghua University and Peking University, with which we can form an alliance to see what we can do in strengthening earlier investments in the Internet industry," he said.

    chengyingqi@chinadaily.com.cn

    Legend to build on 'China's Silicon Valley'|HongKong Business|chinadaily.com.cn
     
  3. beijingwalker

    beijingwalker ELITE MEMBER

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    Uber CEO Says China to Soon Surpass Silicon Valley in Innovation
    Bloomberg News
    January 15, 2016 — 2:15 PM CST
    Watch out, Silicon Valley. China’s out to eat your lunch.

    So says Travis Kalanick, the Silicon Valley pioneer who steered Uber Technologies Inc. to a larger valuation than four-fifths of the companies on the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index. He’s now setting his sights on China: the ride-hailing company’s domestic unit is now valued at more than $8 billion, Kalanick told reporters in Beijing Friday.

    The Uber Chief Executive, who’s personally overseeing Uber’s come-from-behind battleagainst Didi Kuaidi, argued the country’s growing cohort of entrepreneurs will eventually eclipse those that have made the Bay Area a cradle of global technology innovation.


    “In the next five years, there will be more innovation, more invention, more entrepreneurship happening in China, happening in Beijing than in Silicon Valley,” Kalanick said at the “Geekpark” conference in Beijing Friday. That will in turn spur Chinese corporations to begin to go global and open up to entrepreneurs from without. “We gotta play our A-game in order to compete with the best.”

    Jarring View
    Kalanick’s view may not sit well with those who deem the country a violator of intellectual property rights, home to copycat ripoffs and subject to rigorous content restrictions. Just last week at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, U.S. federal marshals raided and confiscated the wares of a Chinese company making one-wheeled skateboards for alleged patent infringements.

    Yet the country has birthed some of Asia’s largest and most well-regarded technology corporations, from social media and gaming giant Tencent Holdings Ltd. to e-commerce leader Alibaba Group Holding Ltd. Along with search-engine operator Baidu Inc., they have invested in and helped foster a plethora of startups and online services -- from mobile payments and messaging to online finance --- whose scope and scale outstrip those available in the U.S.

    Investors are beginning to take note. Investments in China and India, where most of the biggest deals are taking place, more than tripled to $16.9 billion in the third quarter, just under the $17.5 billion invested in North America as of Oct. 1, according to Preqin Ltd., a London-based consultancy. Venture investors closed 1,016 deals in China up to the third quarter of 2015 -- more than in all of 2014.

    Some of that money went to Uber. The company raised a little under $2 billion from Chinese investors last year, much of which went to Uber China. Kalanick told reporters in a group interview Friday he needs to have a CEO there who’s Chinese.

    “I’m really attached to the job now. It’s where all the action is,” he said. “I’m holding the bar at highest level,” he added. “Until we find that perfect person, I will be serving as Uber China CEO.”

    Uber CEO Says China to Soon Surpass Silicon Valley in Innovation - Bloomberg Business
     
  4. Nan Yang

    Nan Yang SENIOR MEMBER

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    After three weeks in China, it's clear Beijing is Silicon Valley's only true competitor

    We are too well-fed in Silicon Valley.


    BY CYRIAC ROEDING MAY 13, 2016, 9:15A

    After selling my startup, Shopkick, to SK Planet in 2014, and handing over my CEO role a year later, I packed up my 1- and 3-year-old sons and my wife Angel, and flew to Beijing, Shenzhen and Hong Kong for three weeks, hoping to better understand the Chinese startup world and its entrepreneurs and VCs.

    I hadn’t been to China in several years, but had almost moved there 12 years ago, so I was very curious what I would find. I met with two dozen startups, from very late-stage — including valuations of $20 billion — to pre-seed stages. I also met with a dozen VCs, two dozen startup entrepreneurs and successful angel investors.

    I started at 30,000 feet with late-stage startups and investors, including a long breakfast meeting with the founder Xing Wang of Meituan — a highly valued Chinese startup at about $20 billion. Then I went to Series B and A, and met with startups like VIPkid and 700bike and VCs like Matrix and BlueRun.

    Then I went to the seed stage, and met a PhD in aerodynamics who is developing a new electric car engine with high-energy density. He demonstrated it to me from the trunk of his car in a subterranean parking structure in Beijing. I visited the hardware incubator HAX in Shenzhen, and met the ZhenFund on the VC side.

    Inspired, I decided I needed to go even earlier stage — to the root of it all — so I went to see the idea and even pre-idea stage at Garage Café, and at the top-rated Tsinghua University’s x-lab and SEM entrepreneurship program, where Peter Thiel happened to be giving a lecture on "Zero to One" right when I arrived.

    As my trip to China drew to a close, I started to reflect on what we in Silicon Valley can learn from China. Here is what I found.

    1. Beijing will be the only true competitor to Silicon Valley in the next 10 years.

    Beijing is not just a nice startup playground which might become truly interesting in a few years. This is the big leagues now. Startups can achieve massive scale quickly, because the domestic market is 1.3 billion people, which is four times the U.S. or European population.

    An increasing share of these 1.3 billion people is actually targetable. In the U.S., 190 million people carry a smartphone; in China, it is more than 530 million today, and it will be 700 million or more in three years.

    Beijing is not a startup playground. This is the big leagues now.


    But a large market alone does not mean that a place will become a startup hub. It is the combination of market size and the extreme consumer-adoption speed of new services, combined with the entrepreneurial spirit and hunger for scale of Chinese entrepreneurs.

    Beijing is the main hub where it happens. Here, entrepreneurs, engineering talent from the two top Chinese universities — Tsinghua and Peking — and VC money come together. Seeing the scale, speed, aspirations, money supply and talent here, I walked away thinking this will be the only true competitor to Silicon Valley in the next 10 years.

    Yes, there are other hubs, such as Berlin, but the scale is different. (India is the only other possible contender here.) And it's good for Silicon Valley to have a true competitor, because it sparks impulses on how to evolve to the next level.

    Let’s look at speed, cloning versus innovation and the entrepreneurial spirit of Beijing versus Silicon Valley.

    2. We pride ourselves on being fast in Silicon Valley. Chinese startups are faster.

    In Beijing, tales abound about the sometimes crass competition between startups, and the often not ethically acceptable methods used to win.

    The extreme competition only secondarily stems from the entrepreneurs; the main driver is the consumer adoption rates. New mobile apps often take off at mass scale even faster than in the U.S., and become a phenomenon overnight.The improvement from new services is large for most consumers, as the majority only went online recently with the arrival of smartphones.

    Big startups are built in three to five years versus five to eight in the U.S. Accordingly, entrepreneurs who try to jump on the bandwagon of a successful idea scramble to outcompete each other as fast as they can.

    Work-life balance is nonexistent in Chinese startups.

    Meetings are anytime — really. My meeting in Beijing with Hugo Barra, who runs all international expansion for Xiaomi — the cool smartphone maker and highest-valued startup in China, at around $45 billion or so — was scheduled for 11 pm, but got delayed because of other meetings, so it started at midnight. (Hugo had a flight to catch at 6:30 am after that.)

    In China, there is a company work culture at startups that's called 9/9/6. It means that regular work hours for most employees are from 9 am to 9 pm, six days a week. If you thought Silicon Valley has intense work hours, think again.

    For founders and top executives, it's often 9/11/6.5. That's probably not very efficient and useful (who's good as a leader when they're always tired and don't know their kids?) but totally common.

    Teams get locked up in hotels for weeks before a product launch, where they only work, sleep and work out, to drive 100 percent focus without distractions and make the launch date. And while I don't think long hours are any measure of productivity, I was amazed by the enormous hunger and drive.

    3. The argument that Chinese entrepreneurs are mainly cloning Western startups is outdated.

    Yes, they clone where they can. But cloning is starting to reach its max — there are just not enough successful ideas to clone. In addition, clones often fail in the local market due to different consumer behavior and needs.

    In China, cloning is just the starting point, not the end point.

    [​IMG]
    With Meituan's Xing Wang.
    Cyriac Roeding


    Take Meituan. I had a two-hour Saturday breakfast with one of China's best entrepreneurs, Xing Wang. He founded his startup, Meituan, in 2010, and within six years built it into one of the largest commerce companies in China. Meituan is currently valued at about $20 billion, which, at the time, made it the highest-valued startup in China besides Xiaomi (the mobile phone maker).

    Meituan is the largest mobile group buying company, largest online ticket sales company and largest food-delivery company in China.

    Xing was up against hundreds of other startups in China trying to be Groupon here when Groupon's star was rising in the U.S. He outcompeted all of them by not even trying to outspend them in marketing, but instead by quickly transforming Meituan into a company very different from Groupon. Today it is focused on bringing customers back to retailers, rather than acquiring them only once with a margin-cutting deal that can't be offered continuously.

    Meituan is making shopping smarter for consumers and sustainable for local retailers. Now Xing has 200 million monthly active customers. Oh, and he has a baby son.

    4. A wave of innovation is coming from China.

    Chinese entrepreneurs are totally pragmatic. They just want to find the fastest way to win. As cloning reaches its max, the next fastest way to win is innovation.

    Take consumer drones. That’s basically hardware meeting software meeting design. Sounds like a typical Silicon Valley play to win, right? Well, DJI dominates the consumer drone market from China (Shenzhen) with 70 percent (!) global market share. DJI is a harbinger of many more cases like these to come. We just don’t see them yet.

    Chinese entrepreneurs just want to find the fastest way to win.

    Innovation takes longer than cloning. For example, in Beijing I met with a young PhD in aerodynamics, who in the past three years has led a mini team of six in stealth mode with next to no funding, to design a 60kW electric engine for cars and robots that weighs 13 kg (29 pounds). Typical electric engines of that power weigh 58 kg (128 pounds) or more. He unveiled his invention to me in an underground parking structure out of the trunk of his car.

    In Shenzhen, the electronics manufacturing capital of China, on the Chinese side of the border to Hong Kong, I visited Benjamin Joffe's HAX, a hardware startup accelerator. Right after the border control in Shenzhen (sort of "from China to China"), you enter a different world, where parts suppliers deliver in less than a day and electronics factories are ready to produce your new gadget.

    At HAX, I tested the $9 computer and the water-and-sand-pressure jet that cuts metal precisely at a fraction of current machines' cost. (Yes, you read correctly: For $9, you can add a Linux computer with Wi-Fi and Bluetooth to any device.)

    I thought I was done when one of the startups offered me some dried flour worms, telling me they are "like crisps, only healthier," and made in their new electronic insect farming machine. They told me that insects are the new trend — we just have to overcome our mental blocks.


    More.....
    http://www.recode.net/2016/5/13/11592570/china-startup-tech-economy-silicon-valley
     
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  5. Amember

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    Now the US copies China in mobile tech

    source: nytimes

    HONG KONG — Snapchat and Kik, the messaging services, use bar codes that look like drunken checkerboards to connect people and share information with a snap of their smartphone cameras. Facebook is working on adding the ability to hail rides and make payments within its Messenger app. Facebook and Twitter have begun live-streaming video.

    All of these developments have something in common: The technology was first popularized in China.

    WeChat and Alipay, two Chinese apps, have long used the bar-codelike symbols — called QR codes — to let people pay for purchases and transfer money. Both let users hail a taxi or order a pizza without switching to another app. The video-streaming service YYcom has for years made online stars of young Chinese people posing, chatting and singing in front of video cameras at home.

    Silicon Valley has long been the world’s tech capital: It birthed social networking and iPhones and spread those tech products across the globe. The rap on China has been that it always followed in the Valley’s footsteps as government censorship abetted the rise of local versions of Google, YouTube and Twitter.

    But China’s tech industry — particularly its mobile businesses — has in some ways pulled ahead of the United States. Some Western tech companies, even the behemoths, are turning to Chinese firms for ideas.

    “We just see China as further ahead,” said Ted Livingston, the founder of Kik, which is headquartered in Waterloo, Ontario.

    The shift suggests that China could have a greater say in the global tech industry’s direction. Already in China, more people use their mobile devices to pay their bills, order services, watch videos and find dates than anywhere else in the world. Mobile payments in the country last year surpassed those in the United States. By some estimates, loans from a new breed of informal online banks called peer-to-peer lenders did too.

    China’s largest internet companies are the only ones in the world that rival America’s in scale. The purchase this week of Uber China by Didi Chuxing after a protracted competition shows that at least domestically, Chinese players can take on the most sophisticated and largest start-ups coming out of America.

    The future of online payments and engagements can be found at Liu Zheng’s noodle shop in central Beijing. Liu Xiu’e, 60, and her neighbor, Zhang Lixin, 55, read about the noodle shop on WeChat. Then they ordered and paid for their lunches and took and posted selfies of themselves outside the restaurant, all using the same app.

    Liu Zheng, who is not related to Liu Xiu’e, said the automated ordering and payments meant he could cut down on wages for waiters. “In the future, we will only need one waiter to help in the restaurant and one to help with seating,” Mr. Liu said.

    Industry leaders point to a number of areas where China jumped first. Before the online dating app Tinder, people in China used an app called Momo to flirt with nearby singles. Before the Amazon chief executive Jeff Bezos discussed using drones to deliver products, Chinese media reported that a local delivery company, S.F. Express, was experimenting with the idea. WeChat offered speedier in-app news articles long before Facebook, developed a walkie-talkie function before WhatsApp, and made major use of QR codes well before Snapchat.

    Before Venmo became the app for millennials to transfer money in the United States, both young and old in China were investing, reimbursing each other, paying bills,and buying products from stores with smartphone-based digital wallets.

    “Quite frankly, the trope that China copies the U.S. hasn’t been true for years, and in mobile it’s the opposite: The U.S. often copies China,” said Ben Thompson, the founder of the tech research firm Stratechery. “For the Facebook Messenger app, for example, the best way to understand their road map is to look at WeChat.”

    A Facebook spokesman declined to comment. Tencent did not respond to requests for comment.

    Executives from companies like Facebook and smaller rivals like Kik are trying to replicate what has emerged in China: dominant online platforms where users will spend much of their time. Much of that effort is focused on chat.

    “The cool thing about chat is it becomes an operating system for your daily life,” Mr. Livingston said. “Going up to a vending machine, ordering food, getting a cab: Chat can power those interactions, and that’s what we’re seeing with WeChat.”

    China still lags in important areas. Its most powerful, high-end servers and supercomputers often rely in part on American technology. Virtual-reality start-ups trail foreign counterparts, and Google has a jump on Baidu in driverless car technology. Many of China’s products also lack the polish of their American counterparts.

    The biggest advantage for China’s tech industry, according to many analysts, is that it was able to fill a vacuum after the country essentially created much of its economy from scratch following the end of the Cultural Revolution, in 1976. Unlike in the United States, where banks and retailers already have strong holds on customers, China’s state-run lenders are inefficient, and retailers never expanded broadly enough to serve a fast-growing middle class.

    Many Chinese also never bought a personal computer, meaning smartphones are the primary — and often first — computing device for the more than 600 million who have them in China.

    “The U.S. was first to credit cards, and everyone there has a personal computer. But China, where everyone is on their phones all the time, is now ahead in mobile commerce and mobile payments by virtue of leapfrogging the PC and credit cards,” Mr. Thompson said.

    Chinese companies also approach the internet in a different way. In the United States, tech firms emphasize simplicity in their apps. But in China, its three major internet companies — Alibaba, Baidu and the WeChat parent Tencent — compete to create a single app with as many functions as they can stuff into it.

    On Alibaba’s Taobao shopping app, people can also buy groceries, buy credits for online games, scan coupons and find deals at stores nearby. Baidu’s mapping app lets users order an Uber, reserve a restaurant or hotel, order in food, buy movie tickets and find just about any type of store nearby.

    Tencent has opened up WeChat to other companies, allowing them to create apps within WeChat. Ebaoyang — a start-up that enables people to order oil changes for their cars directly on smartphones — was at first almost totally reliant on WeChat to attract business. Gao Feng, one of Ebaoyang’s founders, said the company still relied on the app for 50 percent of its payments and 20 percent of new customers.

    “We started from WeChat. So it was our main, original source for getting customers,” he said.

    Between fees for its services and money it makes through online games, WeChat manages to generate $7 in revenue per user each year, according to Nomura. The app has roughly 700 million users, more than the total number of smartphone users in China, in part because some users are outside the country and in part because people have multiple accounts.

    Much of that comes not from ads, as it might in the United States, but from spending on games, services and goods sold on the app. Those models may not translate from one market to the other, but the two can still borrow from each other, said Carmen Chang, a partner at the venture capital firm New Enterprise Associates.

    “China was able to develop a lot of innovative business models, which arose in a different kind of economy,” said Ms. Chang, who spends time in both China and in Menlo Park, Calif. “Whether or not we admit it here in Silicon Valley, it’s had an impact on us and our thinking.”
     
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  6. Max Pain

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    well the R&D spending by China Speaks for Itself.
     
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  7. long_

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    Last edited: Aug 3, 2016
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    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/03/technology/china-mobile-tech-innovation-silicon-valley.html?_r=0
    China, Not Silicon Valley, Is Cutting Edge in Mobile Tech

    [​IMG]

    HONG KONG — Snapchat and Kik, the messaging services, use bar codes that look like drunken checkerboards to connect people and share information with a snap of their smartphone cameras. Facebook is working on adding the ability to hail rides and make payments within its Messenger app. Facebook and Twitter have begun live-streaming video.

    All of these developments have something in common: The technology was first popularized in China.

    WeChat and Alipay, two Chinese apps, have long used the bar-codelike symbols — called QR codes — to let people pay for purchases and transfer money. Both let users hail a taxi or order a pizza without switching to another app. The video-streaming service YY.com has for years made online stars of young Chinese people posing, chatting and singing in front of video cameras at home.

    Silicon Valley has long been the world’s tech capital: It birthed social networking and iPhones and spread those tech products across the globe. The rap on China has been that it always followed in the Valley’s footsteps as government censorship abetted the rise of local versions of Google, YouTube and Twitter.

    But China’s tech industry — particularly its mobile businesses — has in some ways pulled ahead of the United States. Some Western tech companies, even the behemoths, are turning to Chinese firms for ideas.

    “We just see China as further ahead,” said Ted Livingston, the founder of Kik, which is headquartered in Waterloo, Ontario.

    The shift suggests that China could have a greater say in the global tech industry’s direction. Already in China, more people use their mobile devices to pay their bills, order services, watch videos and find dates than anywhere else in the world. Mobile payments in the country last year surpassed those in the United States. By some estimates, loans from a new breed of informal online banks called peer-to-peer lenders did too.

    ......................
     
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  9. long_

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    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/03/technology/china-mobile-tech-innovation-silicon-valley.html?_r=0
    China, Not Silicon Valley, Is Cutting Edge in Mobile Tech

    By PAUL MOZUR August 3, 2016

    HONG KONG — Snapchat and Kik, the messaging services, use bar codes that look like drunken checkerboards to connect people and share information with a snap of their smartphone cameras. Facebook is working on adding the ability to hail rides and make payments within its Messenger app. Facebook and Twitter have begun live-streaming video.

    All of these developments have something in common: The technology was first popularized in China.

    WeChat and Alipay, two Chinese apps, have long used the bar-codelike symbols — called QR codes — to let people pay for purchases and transfer money. Both let users hail a taxi or order a pizza without switching to another app. The video-streaming service YY.com has for years made online stars of young Chinese people posing, chatting and singing in front of video cameras at home.

    Silicon Valley has long been the world’s tech capital: It birthed social networking and iPhones and spread those tech products across the globe. The rap on China has been that it always followed in the Valley’s footsteps as government censorship abetted the rise of local versions of Google, YouTube and Twitter.

    But China’s tech industry — particularly its mobile businesses — has in some ways pulled ahead of the United States. Some Western tech companies, even the behemoths, are turning to Chinese firms for ideas.

    “We just see China as further ahead,” said Ted Livingston, the founder of Kik, which is headquartered in Waterloo, Ontario.

    The shift suggests that China could have a greater say in the global tech industry’s direction. Already in China, more people use their mobile devices to pay their bills, order services, watch videos and find dates than anywhere else in the world. Mobile payments in the country last year surpassed those in the United States. By some estimates, loans from a new breed of informal online banks called peer-to-peer lenders did too.

    China’s largest internet companies are the only ones in the world that rival America’s in scale. The purchase this week of Uber China by Didi Chuxingafter a protracted competition shows that at least domestically, Chinese players can take on the most sophisticated and largest start-ups coming out of America.

    The future of online payments and engagements can be found at Liu Zheng’s noodle shop in central Beijing. Liu Xiu’e, 60, and her neighbor, Zhang Lixin, 55, read about the noodle shop on WeChat. Then they ordered and paid for their lunches and took and posted selfies of themselves outside the restaurant, all using the same app.

    Liu Zheng, who is not related to Liu Xiu’e, said the automated ordering and payments meant he could cut down on wages for waiters. “In the future, we will only need one waiter to help in the restaurant and one to help with seating,” Mr. Liu said.

    Industry leaders point to a number of areas where China jumped first. Before the online dating app Tinder, people in China used an app called Momo to flirt with nearby singles. Before the Amazon chief executive Jeff Bezos discussed using drones to deliver products, Chinese media reported that a local delivery company, S.F. Express, was experimenting with the idea. WeChat offered speedier in-app news articles long before Facebook, developed a walkie-talkie function before WhatsApp, and made major use of QR codes well before Snapchat.

    Before Venmo became the app for millennials to transfer money in the United States, both young and old in China were investing, reimbursing each other, paying bills,and buying products from stores with smartphone-based digital wallets.

    “Quite frankly, the trope that China copies the U.S. hasn’t been true for years, and in mobile it’s the opposite: The U.S. often copies China,” said Ben Thompson, the founder of the tech research firm Stratechery. “For the Facebook Messenger app, for example, the best way to understand their road map is to look at WeChat.”

    A Facebook spokesman declined to comment. Tencent did not respond to requests for comment.

    Executives from companies like Facebook and smaller rivals like Kik are trying to replicate what has emerged in China: dominant online platforms where users will spend much of their time. Much of that effort is focused on chat.

    “The cool thing about chat is it becomes an operating system for your daily life,” Mr. Livingston said. “Going up to a vending machine, ordering food, getting a cab: Chat can power those interactions, and that’s what we’re seeing with WeChat.”

    China still lags in important areas. Its most powerful, high-end servers and supercomputers often rely in part on American technology. Virtual-reality start-ups trail foreign counterparts, and Google has a jump on Baidu indriverless car technology. Many of China’s products also lack the polish of their American counterparts.

    The biggest advantage for China’s tech industry, according to many analysts, is that it was able to fill a vacuum after the country essentially created much of its economy from scratch following the end of the Cultural Revolution, in 1976. Unlike in the United States, where banks and retailers already have strong holds on customers, China’s state-run lenders are inefficient, and retailers never expanded broadly enough to serve a fast-growing middle class.

    Many Chinese also never bought a personal computer, meaning smartphones are the primary — and often first — computing device for the more than 600 million who have them in China.

    “The U.S. was first to credit cards, and everyone there has a personal computer. But China, where everyone is on their phones all the time, is now ahead in mobile commerce and mobile payments by virtue of leapfrogging the PC and credit cards,” Mr. Thompson said.

    Chinese companies also approach the internet in a different way. In the United States, tech firms emphasize simplicity in their apps. But in China, its three major internet companies — Alibaba, Baidu and the WeChat parent Tencent — compete to create a single app with as many functions as they can stuff into it.

    On Alibaba’s Taobao shopping app, people can also buy groceries, buy credits for online games, scan coupons and find deals at stores nearby. Baidu’s mapping app lets users order an Uber, reserve a restaurant or hotel, order in food, buy movie tickets and find just about any type of store nearby.

    Tencent has opened up WeChat to other companies, allowing them to create apps within WeChat. Ebaoyang — a start-up that enables people to order oil changes for their cars directly on smartphones — was at first almost totally reliant on WeChat to attract business. Gao Feng, one of Ebaoyang’s founders, said the company still relied on the app for 50 percent of its payments and 20 percent of new customers.

    “We started from WeChat. So it was our main, original source for getting customers,” he said.

    Between fees for its services and money it makes through online games, WeChat manages to generate $7 in revenue per user each year, according to Nomura. The app has roughly 700 million users, more than the total number of smartphone users in China, in part because some users are outside the country and in part because people have multiple accounts.

    Much of that comes not from ads, as it might in the United States, but from spending on games, services and goods sold on the app. Those models may not translate from one market to the other, but the two can still borrow from each other, said Carmen Chang, a partner at the venture capital firm New Enterprise Associates.

    “China was able to develop a lot of innovative business models, which arose in a different kind of economy,” said Ms. Chang, who spends time in both China and in Menlo Park, Calif. “Whether or not we admit it here in Silicon Valley, it’s had an impact on us and our thinking.”

    Copyright © 2016 The New York Times Company. All rights reserved.

     
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  10. DoTell

    DoTell FULL MEMBER

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    But China is still lacking abilities in the following areas:
    1. Bragging
    Claiming to have the ability/potential to do something but never delivers.

    2. Smearing
    Making baseless accusations on others who have worked hard and accomplished their goals. Whatever the achievers have done must have been copied and stolen.

    3. Wishful thinking
    The enemy's people are brainless slaves, their economy is collapsing and their country is contained.
     
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  11. Beidou2020

    Beidou2020 SENIOR MEMBER

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    3 important things one must achieve to become a true superpower.

    Only true superpowers can do those things :p:
     
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  12. Jlaw

    Jlaw ELITE MEMBER

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    so true
     
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  13. GCTom

    GCTom FULL MEMBER

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    China's mobile tech development is advancing but it is still following the footstep of the others and using others patents and ideas. To really get ahead China needs to innovate and develop new techs.
     
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  14. long_

    long_ SENIOR MEMBER

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    Apple starts paying royalties to Huawei: report
    2016-5-10 21:08:01

    Huawei licensed 769 patents to Apple in 2015, including those relating to the GSM, UMTS and LTE wireless communication technologies, while the US company only gave Huawei licenses to 98 patents in return, the report said, citing data from the Guangdong Intellectual Property Office.

    Huawei declined to reveal financial details of the patent deals when contacted by the Beijing Youth Daily.

    Huawei has reached similar patent deals with other IT giants. For instance, it agreed in January with Sweden's Ericsson AB to extend a global patent deal that allows the companies to access each other's essential patents and technologies globally.

    As of the end of 2015, Huawei had filed 52,550 patent applications in China and 30,613 applications abroad. A total of 50,377 patents had been granted by that time, the report said.

    In 2015, the company invested 59.6 billion yuan ($9.15 billion) in research and development, up 46.1 percent year-on-year, according to its annual report released on April 1.

    Chinese technology companies have attached increasing importance to patents. In 2015, Huawei filed 3,216 patent applications, ranking No.3 among all Chinese technology companies.

    Rival ZTE Corp topped the list with 3,516 patent applications, while handset maker Guangdong OPPO Mobile Telecommunications Corp ranked second with 3,338 filed, according to data from the State Intellectual Property Office in April.
     
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  15. GCTom

    GCTom FULL MEMBER

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    Well, look at all the high end Chinese smart phones, where are the inner components made from? Like the CPU, GPU, Rams, Screen, Camera..etc? Most if not all of them are from foreign countries which Chinese mobile phone companies have to pay loyalties for. And most important of all, the OS? Android, which is from Google.

    When foreign countries controlling all these core components then they can control the future path and development of these mobile phones. Chinese phone companies can only follow after these foreign companies decides and dictates new features and hardware. Samsung knows this and that's why it develops its own core components and its own OS. But even for such big company like Samsung, it just not powerful or skillful enough to build a good OS.

    Given all the above, these Chinese mobile phone still have a long long way to go. Up, like Samsung, or Down like Nokia. But it doesn't matter to Google, since it controls the OS, it will win in any case.