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China's deepening anti-corruption drive

eazzy

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Nice but structural and cultural changes must happen in order to stop corruption.
 

S10

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*Yawn*

Tell me when they have 370,000 officials under investigation, then I'll know they're serious.
 

Daniel808

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Good luck For China to their Anti Corruption Campaign
I am Really Admire, That China President, Mr.Xi Jinping :china:
Just a few People in the World, who are trying to clean up its own Government and Party. :-)

Hope Indonesia can Have a Leader like that, too.
 

TaiShang

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Fight against corruption contributes to China's democracy

Global Times

The intensified battle against corruption in 2013 has helped building political integrity and contributed to the development of democracy, said a government report Monday.

In 2013 the Communist Party of China (CPC) and the Chinese government further intensified their efforts to combat corruption, said a report on China's human rights in 2013, issued by the State Council Information Office.

They put power, government operations and personnel management under institutional checks to ensure that the people oversee the exercise of power and that power is exercised in a transparent manner, the report said.

"Building political integrity is the premise of the effective operation of a democratic system," the report said.

The central government decentralized and canceled 416 items of administrative approvals in 2013, as part of the institutional reform of the State Council.

The CPC Central Committee issued the Work Plan for Establishing and Improving the System of Preventing and Punishing Corruption (2013-2017).

In 2013 procuratorates at all levels investigated 37,551 graft cases involving 51,306 suspects, up 9.4 percent and 8.4 percent respectively from 2012.

China investigated 2,581 cases of embezzlement, bribery and appropriation of public funds, each involving over 1 million yuan, and 2,871 officials at and above the county level, including eight at the provincial or ministerial level.

Courts also intensified efforts to punish embezzlement and bribery crimes. They closed the trials of 29,000 cases of embezzlement, bribery, dereliction of duty and infringement of rights, and convicted 31,000 people.
 

TaiShang

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Australian, Chinese police target Australian assets of corrupt Chinese officials

Australian and Chinese police have joined forces to seize the assets of corrupt Chinese officials who are living in Australia, local media reported on Monday.

Called "Operation Fox Hunt", Australian Federal Police (AFP) together with their Chinese counterparts will take action in the coming weeks, according to Commander Bruce Hill, the manager of the AFP's operations in Asia.

Hill told Fairfax Media that Australia had agreed to assist China in the extradition and seizure of assets of corrupt officials who have fled to Australia with illicit funds running into the hundreds of millions of dollars.

Hill said Australia had been identified by Beijing as one of the most popular outlets for corrupt Chinese money and a number of the suspects are naturalized Australian citizens and permanent residents who have laundered money.

"They don't all of a sudden leave overnight and take a bag of money with them. In some cases they're very carefully planned," Hill said.

Hill said some Chinese officials send their spouse and children overseas to shift the money.

"As time goes on, they start to put (their funds) into legitimate assets such as houses and property and shares and bank accounts and then the money becomes their wealth," Hill said.


"But it's never been their money to start with in the first place; it's the corrupt money flowing out of China."

The joint Australian-Chinese police operation follows the Chinese government's ongoing and wide-ranging anti-corruption drive.
 

Keel

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Nice drive!

At least from what I have read the Ozies are more decent than the greedy and treacherous Canadians who would charge an administration fee before the alleged criminals are deported

Also if someone can still remember the 赖昌星 case. He carried millions of dollars into Canada. He spent all the money IN CANADA fighting against deportation and guess the end result - he lost the case and handcuffed back to China, penniless!:o::coffee:
 

TaiShang

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Nice drive!

At least from what I have read the Ozies are more decent than the greedy and treacherous Canadians who would charge an administration fee before the alleged criminals are deported

Also if someone can still remember the 赖昌星 case. He carried millions of dollars into Canada. He spent all the money IN CANADA fighting against deportation and guess the end result - he lost the case and handcuffed back to China, penniless!:o::coffee:
Joint operation hunts down fleeing corrupt officials
By Liu Zhun Source:Global Times Published: 2014-10-22 0:08:01

A landmark joint operation between Australia and China sends a signal that China's anti-corruption campaign, which was launched by China's new leaders when they took office in 2012, has extended its reach overseas. According to the Australian Federal Police (AFP), they have joined forces with their Chinese counterparts to track down and seize the assets of Chinese government officials who live in Australia and are suspected of corruption.

Called "Fox Hunt," this operation will see actions taken in the following weeks. According to media reports, both sides have agreed on a priority list which was culled from a broader one of no less than 100 people. Some high-profile fugitives such as Gao Yan, former secretary of the Yunnan Party provincial committee, are expected to be apprehended.

There are still no exact official statistics to show how many corrupt officials have fled overseas and how much money they have pocketed. But according to the Washington-based Global Financial Integrity Group, about $3 trillion was transferred out of China illegally between 2005 and 2011.

Large portions of the money flowed to the US, Canada and Australia, which are widely known to be the havens of these corrupt officials. By resorting to all kinds of ways, they are able to launder the money, acquire citizenship and escape justice.

Although there are no extradition treaties, a progressive consensus has taken shape between China and these countries to form an alliance to hunt down corrupt officials on the run. This agreement with Australia is a breakthrough after a few years' efforts. It will serve as a fine example, and the cooperative model can be re-employed.

This milestone indicates that the international community, especially the West, has found more common ground with China in the endeavor to fight corruption. Some old disagreements, such as how to preserve the legal rights of these corrupt officials when they are sent back and how to deal with the illicit money, must have been fully discussed and common views must have been made.

We need down-to-earth achievements, such as capturing some big shots, to send a warning. In this way, this overseas operation is expected to deal a solid blow to these fugitive officials and sound a deadly alarm to anyone who is considering following the same path.

***

I wonder if US will agree to sign a similar agreement with China. Will they sacrifice the golden-egg laying geese?
 

TaiShang

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Overseas 'no safe haven' for corrupt officials

Corrupt officials who think that foreign countries are safe havens are indulging in wishful thinking, an anonymous insider told the People's Daily website yesterday.




Nowhere to hide [Photo/China.org.cn]

Authorities have tracked down a significant number of Chinese officials suspected of absconding with illicit funds amid an international manhunt.

Operation "Fox Hunt," which was launched on July 22, has snared nearly 130 fugitives and uncovered the whereabouts of many others.

Authorities haven't released the exact number of fugitive officials, but statistics from various research institutions had suggested a rising trend.

In 2004, the Chinese Academy of International Trade and Economic Cooperation said that nearly 4,000 officials had fled overseas since the introduction of 1978's reform and opening-up policy. They took nearly US$50 billion with them, the academy said.

In 2008, China's central bank, the People's Bank of China, cited a Chinese Academy of Social Sciences research report saying that about 16,000 to 18,000 officials from Party organs, government departments, state institutions and state-owned companies had fled overseas or disappeared since the mid-1990s along with 800 billion yuan (US$131 billion).

Cao Jianming, China's top procurator, revealed in October last year that 6,694 corrupt officials had been caught overseas between 2008 and 2013.

According to China's top Party disciplinary watchdog, 1,100 officials failed to return to China after going abroad on holiday last year. Among them, 714 were identified as fleeing overseas.

This February, the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences said the number was sure to rise, especially of officials who had acquaintances or assets overseas.

Australia, the United States and Canada were the most popular destinations.

According to the Australian Financial Review, they are drawn to Australia because it provides some of the strongest protections for individuals facing criminal charges anywhere in the world.

"This flow of money out of China has reportedly boosted demand for houses, filled universities and fueled spending on luxury goods right across the Australian economy," it said.

It explained how Chinese fortunes could be hidden in Australia by giving the example of Su Shunhu, former deputy director of transport at the former Ministry of Railways.

Su was sentenced to life imprisonment on October 17 for taking bribes worth nearly 24.9 million yuan from three companies between 2003 and 2011.

The Beijing No. 2 Intermediate People's Court found Zhou Yunfu, boss of one of the companies, sent A$1.19 million (US$1.05 million) to Su's son Su Guanlin and daughter-in-law Qian Yi in Sydney.

They used the cash to deal in property worth A$4.5million, the newspaper said.

Last week, the Sydney Morning Herald reported that Australian police had agreed to assist China in extraditing corrupt Chinese officials.

***

So, judgement day for traitors is approaching. LOL.
 

senheiser

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China to protect whistleblowers exposing corruption
Published time: October 29, 2014 09:10
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Reuters / Carlos Barria

Chinese authorities have said, for the first time, that whistleblowers will receive legal protection amid the country’s ongoing fight against corruption.

The Supreme People’s Procuratorate, the country’s top prosecuting body, said in a Tuesday statement that new regulations outline legal rights for those exposing corruption and other malpractice. It urged people to file their reports via official channels and do it in a “lawful manner” without falsifying the truth.

"The 'regulations governing the work of whistleblowers' require that when the prosecutor's office receives a whistleblowing report from someone giving their real name, it has to assess the risks from the whistleblowing and develop whistleblower protection plans when necessary to prevent and end acts of retaliation against the whistleblowers," Reuters quotes the reported statement.

Last year the Central Commission for Discipline Inspection [the party’s anti-corruption watchdog] launched a new website for whistleblowers. The party also appealed for citizens to report on wrongdoing via a telephone hotline set up by the government. However, authorities don’t provide legal protection to those who make revelations outside government channels. For example, via Chinese social networks or in the mainstream media.

President Xi Jinping has made battling corruption one of the Communist party’s priorities since he took office in 2012. However, the idea of tackling malpractice through whistleblowing has the public suspicious that complaints will be ignored, and there are fears of arrests and further attacks on online whistleblowers.

In mid-October, a Chinese investigative journalist who wrote critical reports on a state-controlled construction equipment maker was sentenced to prison for defamation and bribery.

Since the latest anti-corruption campaign began, several bloggers who posted their allegations online have faced abuse and harassment.

Reuters reported that blogger Li Jianxin was stabbed in the face in July, blinded in his right eye by two unidentified men, who also splashed acid on his back.




Li Jianxin, a blogger and online whistleblower, lies on a bed waiting for a fourth operation at a hospital in the southern Chinese city of Huizhou, Guangdong province July 23, 2013. (Reuters/Tyrone Siu)
 

TaiShang

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Criminal investigation, tracking, international cooperation and hunting down of the corrupt people is the way to go.

At APEC Summit, agreement has been reached for setting up such mechanism among member states/regions.

So far, so good.

Fight against corruption contributes to China's democracy
GT

The intensified battle against corruption in 2013 has helped building political integrity and contributed to the development of democracy, said a government report Monday.

In 2013 the Communist Party of China (CPC) and the Chinese government further intensified their efforts to combat corruption, said a report on China's human rights in 2013, issued by the State Council Information Office.

They put power, government operations and personnel management under institutional checks to ensure that the people oversee the exercise of power and that power is exercised in a transparent manner, the report said.

"Building political integrity is the premise of the effective operation of a democratic system," the report said.

The central government decentralized and canceled 416 items of administrative approvals in 2013, as part of the institutional reform of the State Council.

The CPC Central Committee issued the Work Plan for Establishing and Improving the System of Preventing and Punishing Corruption (2013-2017).

In 2013 procuratorates at all levels investigated 37,551 graft cases involving 51,306 suspects, up 9.4 percent and 8.4 percent respectively from 2012.

China investigated 2,581 cases of embezzlement, bribery and appropriation of public funds, each involving over 1 million yuan, and 2,871 officials at and above the county level, including eight at the provincial or ministerial level.

Courts also intensified efforts to punish embezzlement and bribery crimes. They closed the trials of 29,000 cases of embezzlement, bribery, dereliction of duty and infringement of rights, and convicted 31,000 people.
 

C130

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i'm just curious on how they extradite these corrupt officials back to China?? is interpol involved???
 

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