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beijingwalker

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China surpassing Russia in airpower technology: RUSI
By Greg Waldron10 November 2020


The Royal United Services Institute (RUSI) has concluded that China is well on its way to eclipsing Russia in the field of combat aircraft.

In a recent report, the UK-based think tank contends that Russia and China are on different trajectories in combat aircraft development, with China taking a clear lead in areas such as sensors, datalinks, weapons, and low-observable technology. The single area where Russia retains an edge over China is in aircraft engines.


Source: Wikimedia Commons
The Chengdu J-20 can carry four PL-15 long-range air-to-air missiles in its main weapons bay, in addition to a pair of infrared-homing PL-10s in its side weapons bays


The report, authored by research fellow Justin Bronk, notes that the two countries largely rely on derivatives of the Sukhoi Su-27, that both have worked on low observable aircraft, and that both have increased multi-role capability.

Nonetheless, China is pulling ahead, with advanced types joining both the People’s Liberation Army Air Force (PLAAF) and People’s Liberation Army Navy Air Force (PLANAF).

“China has started to build a clear technical lead over Russia in most aspects of combat aircraft development,” says RUSI. “Moreover, Russian industry is unlikely to be able to regain areas of competitive advantage once lost, due to deep structural industrial and budgetary disadvantages compared to the Chinese sector.”

Among light fighters, RUSI contends that the Chengdu J-10 family is “significantly more efficient and flexible than the aging” RAC MiG-29/35 series. At the higher end, the Chengdu J-20 is the only deployed stealth fighter, apart from Lockheed Martin’s F-35 and F-22.

“The J-20 family will be produced in the hundreds over the coming decade, constituting the foremost existing aerial threat to Western air superiority types,” says RUSI.


Source: Greg Waldron/FlightGlobal
The Su-35 at the Paris air show in June 2013


Russia’s Su-57, on the other hand, has yet to become a frontline system, and lacks “the basic design features required for a true [low observable] signature”.

The report notes that Russia has struggled to field effective active electronically scanned array (AESA) radars, which offer pilots high detection ranges, but feature low probability of intercept/low probability of detection by adversaries.

As for China’s version of the Su-27, the Shenyang J-11, China has done a great deal to modernise the platform, including the use of composite materials that improve the Chinese version’s thrust-to-weight ratio. RUSI believes that the new J-11D version, equipped with an AESA radar, internal electronic warfare suite, and a superior weapons payload, will be superior to the most advanced iteration of the Su-27 family, the Su-35.

RUSI also regards the Chinese version of the Su-30, the J-16, as a major improvement.

“The J-16 features an AESA radar, increased use of composite materials for reduced weight, a fully digital ‘glass’ cockpit for both crew, compatibility with the full range of Chinese [precision-guided munitions] and a new targeting pod called YINGS-III which is roughly comparable to the US [Lockheed] Sniper pod,” says RUSI.


Source: Greg Waldron
The Chengdu J-10B at Airshow China in 2016

“Following its entry to service in 2015, the J-16 is expected to replace [China’s] Su-30MKK and MK2 fleets over the coming decade in both PLAAF and eventually PLANAF service, and is currently China’s most capable multirole and strike aircraft.”

The report speculates that the 2020s could even see Russia importing Chinese sensor and missile technology.

“For this to occur, the Russian government would have to overcome considerable levels of distrust between Russia and China in military terms, as well as deep-seated Russian pride and attachment to their sovereign aerospace industry,” says RUSI.

“However, the increasing superiority of Chinese radars, [air-to-air missiles] and targeting pods may prove sufficient motivation, especially in the face of a new generation of Western combat aircraft development programmes.”

 

Deino

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China surpassing Russia in airpower technology: RUSI
By Greg Waldron10 November 2020


The Royal United Services Institute (RUSI) has concluded that China is well on its way to eclipsing Russia in the field of combat aircraft.

In a recent report, the UK-based think tank contends that Russia and China are on different trajectories in combat aircraft development, with China taking a clear lead in areas such as sensors, datalinks, weapons, and low-observable technology. The single area where Russia retains an edge over China is in aircraft engines.


Source: Wikimedia Commons
The Chengdu J-20 can carry four PL-15 long-range air-to-air missiles in its main weapons bay, in addition to a pair of infrared-homing PL-10s in its side weapons bays


The report, authored by research fellow Justin Bronk, notes that the two countries largely rely on derivatives of the Sukhoi Su-27, that both have worked on low observable aircraft, and that both have increased multi-role capability.

Nonetheless, China is pulling ahead, with advanced types joining both the People’s Liberation Army Air Force (PLAAF) and People’s Liberation Army Navy Air Force (PLANAF).

“China has started to build a clear technical lead over Russia in most aspects of combat aircraft development,” says RUSI. “Moreover, Russian industry is unlikely to be able to regain areas of competitive advantage once lost, due to deep structural industrial and budgetary disadvantages compared to the Chinese sector.”

Among light fighters, RUSI contends that the Chengdu J-10 family is “significantly more efficient and flexible than the aging” RAC MiG-29/35 series. At the higher end, the Chengdu J-20 is the only deployed stealth fighter, apart from Lockheed Martin’s F-35 and F-22.

“The J-20 family will be produced in the hundreds over the coming decade, constituting the foremost existing aerial threat to Western air superiority types,” says RUSI.


Source: Greg Waldron/FlightGlobal
The Su-35 at the Paris air show in June 2013


Russia’s Su-57, on the other hand, has yet to become a frontline system, and lacks “the basic design features required for a true [low observable] signature”.

The report notes that Russia has struggled to field effective active electronically scanned array (AESA) radars, which offer pilots high detection ranges, but feature low probability of intercept/low probability of detection by adversaries.

As for China’s version of the Su-27, the Shenyang J-11, China has done a great deal to modernise the platform, including the use of composite materials that improve the Chinese version’s thrust-to-weight ratio. RUSI believes that the new J-11D version, equipped with an AESA radar, internal electronic warfare suite, and a superior weapons payload, will be superior to the most advanced iteration of the Su-27 family, the Su-35.

RUSI also regards the Chinese version of the Su-30, the J-16, as a major improvement.

“The J-16 features an AESA radar, increased use of composite materials for reduced weight, a fully digital ‘glass’ cockpit for both crew, compatibility with the full range of Chinese [precision-guided munitions] and a new targeting pod called YINGS-III which is roughly comparable to the US [Lockheed] Sniper pod,” says RUSI.


Source: Greg Waldron
The Chengdu J-10B at Airshow China in 2016

“Following its entry to service in 2015, the J-16 is expected to replace [China’s] Su-30MKK and MK2 fleets over the coming decade in both PLAAF and eventually PLANAF service, and is currently China’s most capable multirole and strike aircraft.”

The report speculates that the 2020s could even see Russia importing Chinese sensor and missile technology.

“For this to occur, the Russian government would have to overcome considerable levels of distrust between Russia and China in military terms, as well as deep-seated Russian pride and attachment to their sovereign aerospace industry,” says RUSI.

“However, the increasing superiority of Chinese radars, [air-to-air missiles] and targeting pods may prove sufficient motivation, especially in the face of a new generation of Western combat aircraft development programmes.”


The ironic - or at least for me quite sad - part of that story behind is, that I was invited by RUSI to hold that lecture in London at the planned RUSI Martial Power conference: "Competing Visions for the Future of Combat Air", which was cancelled due to the COVID pandemic in March this year. So it seems, Justin wrote a pdf as a substitute.

If you are interested, here's the full pdf ready to download:


... and also, please take a look to the sources! :meeting:
 

alee92nawaz

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China surpassing Russia in airpower technology: RUSI
By Greg Waldron10 November 2020


The Royal United Services Institute (RUSI) has concluded that China is well on its way to eclipsing Russia in the field of combat aircraft.

In a recent report, the UK-based think tank contends that Russia and China are on different trajectories in combat aircraft development, with China taking a clear lead in areas such as sensors, datalinks, weapons, and low-observable technology. The single area where Russia retains an edge over China is in aircraft engines.


Source: Wikimedia Commons
The Chengdu J-20 can carry four PL-15 long-range air-to-air missiles in its main weapons bay, in addition to a pair of infrared-homing PL-10s in its side weapons bays


The report, authored by research fellow Justin Bronk, notes that the two countries largely rely on derivatives of the Sukhoi Su-27, that both have worked on low observable aircraft, and that both have increased multi-role capability.

Nonetheless, China is pulling ahead, with advanced types joining both the People’s Liberation Army Air Force (PLAAF) and People’s Liberation Army Navy Air Force (PLANAF).

“China has started to build a clear technical lead over Russia in most aspects of combat aircraft development,” says RUSI. “Moreover, Russian industry is unlikely to be able to regain areas of competitive advantage once lost, due to deep structural industrial and budgetary disadvantages compared to the Chinese sector.”

Among light fighters, RUSI contends that the Chengdu J-10 family is “significantly more efficient and flexible than the aging” RAC MiG-29/35 series. At the higher end, the Chengdu J-20 is the only deployed stealth fighter, apart from Lockheed Martin’s F-35 and F-22.

“The J-20 family will be produced in the hundreds over the coming decade, constituting the foremost existing aerial threat to Western air superiority types,” says RUSI.


Source: Greg Waldron/FlightGlobal
The Su-35 at the Paris air show in June 2013


Russia’s Su-57, on the other hand, has yet to become a frontline system, and lacks “the basic design features required for a true [low observable] signature”.

The report notes that Russia has struggled to field effective active electronically scanned array (AESA) radars, which offer pilots high detection ranges, but feature low probability of intercept/low probability of detection by adversaries.

As for China’s version of the Su-27, the Shenyang J-11, China has done a great deal to modernise the platform, including the use of composite materials that improve the Chinese version’s thrust-to-weight ratio. RUSI believes that the new J-11D version, equipped with an AESA radar, internal electronic warfare suite, and a superior weapons payload, will be superior to the most advanced iteration of the Su-27 family, the Su-35.

RUSI also regards the Chinese version of the Su-30, the J-16, as a major improvement.

“The J-16 features an AESA radar, increased use of composite materials for reduced weight, a fully digital ‘glass’ cockpit for both crew, compatibility with the full range of Chinese [precision-guided munitions] and a new targeting pod called YINGS-III which is roughly comparable to the US [Lockheed] Sniper pod,” says RUSI.


Source: Greg Waldron
The Chengdu J-10B at Airshow China in 2016

“Following its entry to service in 2015, the J-16 is expected to replace [China’s] Su-30MKK and MK2 fleets over the coming decade in both PLAAF and eventually PLANAF service, and is currently China’s most capable multirole and strike aircraft.”

The report speculates that the 2020s could even see Russia importing Chinese sensor and missile technology.

“For this to occur, the Russian government would have to overcome considerable levels of distrust between Russia and China in military terms, as well as deep-seated Russian pride and attachment to their sovereign aerospace industry,” says RUSI.

“However, the increasing superiority of Chinese radars, [air-to-air missiles] and targeting pods may prove sufficient motivation, especially in the face of a new generation of Western combat aircraft development programmes.”

They lag behind especially in engine manufacturing
 

ZeEa5KPul

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First, China did not move ahead with the J-11D, instead the technologies developed for it went into the J-11BG upgrade program. Second, it's doubtful Russia retains any technical edge in turbofan manufacturing over China with the successful development of the WS-10 family.
 

My-Analogous

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First, China did not move ahead with the J-11D, instead the technologies developed for it went into the J-11BG upgrade program. Second, it's doubtful Russia retains any technical edge in turbofan manufacturing over China with the successful development of the WS-10 family.
If they put name W11, that engine will work like anything. Anyone from Karachi know what i mean:-)
 

vi-va

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The ironic - or at least for me quite sad - part of that story behind is, that I was invited by RUSI to hold that lecture in London at the planned RUSI Martial Power conference: "Competing Visions for the Future of Combat Air", which was cancelled due to the COVID pandemic in March this year. So it seems, Justin wrote a pdf as a substitute.

If you are interested, here's the full pdf ready to download:


... and also, please take a look to the sources! :meeting:
Aha. A lot of stuff used your book as reference.
1605022637508.png

From long term perspective, investment definitely matters a lot. US and China invested much more.
 

retaxis

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China develop advanced stealth drone. Only USA has stealth drone. Only China and USA has fifth gen jet fighters and stealth drones.

China has had a lot of Russian support with knowledge and ideas over the last two decades and own a lot of its progress to Russian help. Russia does not have the money to fund a lot of their ideas which China puts into action but this is how ALLIES help each other.
 

retaxis

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But after China surpasses Russia in all army, navy and airforce weapons and equipments, where would India buy their weapons?
India is weak. Vietnam or South Korea would put up 10x the fight these Indians would offer. China would walk into Mumbai within a week. Indian military isnt even fully mechanised, soldiers gonna walk from South India to Doklam just in time to watch the surrender if they dont starve to death along the way.
 

retaxis

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India will rely on Hanjians to supply Chinese weapon blueprints

Just like how India copied CX-1 cruise missile and named it Brahmos
Low IQ indians wouldnt know what to do with blueprints anyway. You probably end up making a bicycle from it and call it a success. India buys everything because even with all the blueprints in the world, you fail to make the most simply military toys.
 

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