• Monday, December 16, 2019

China/Pak to build 6 300MW N-stations

Discussion in 'Pakistan Strategic Forces' started by RAPTOR, Jul 28, 2006.

  1. Janbaz

    Janbaz SENIOR MEMBER

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    Good Stuff
     
  2. Kaiser

    Kaiser FULL MEMBER

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    If this project works out, then china will become a science and technological superpower over night, and for the rest of history China will be in the nuclear textbooks.

    If this tech does work out then you can expect Pakistan to get the tech in the future as well :flag:
     
  3. Neo

    Neo RETIRED

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    Pak plans to increase N-power generation

    Tuesday, October 17,2006
    ISLAMABAD: In a major development, the authorities concerned have selected six sites in the first phase to install more nuclear power plants to materialise the plan to increase the country’s capacity to generate 8,800MW nuclear power by 2030. The Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC) has selected six sites for the purpose in line with the recommendations of the Pakistan Nuclear Regulatory Authority (PNRA) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).
    According to a senior official, the PAEC has selected six sites for installation of more nuclear power plants (NPPs) that include (1) Qadirabad-Bulloki link canal near Qadirabad headworks (2) Dera Ghazi Khan canal near Taunsa Barrage (3) Taunsa-Punjnad canal near Multan (4) Nara canal near Sukkur (5) Pat Feeder canal near Guddu and (6) the Kabul river near Nowshera.

    “Prior selection and evaluation of sites for nuclear power plants is mandatory for the implementation of the long-term nuclear power expansion programme which envisages a total nuclear capacity of 8,800MW by 2030.”

    The official said that after the first phase of identifying the sites, the government will launch preliminary studies or investigation and in the last phase detailed investigation about the sites would be carried out.

    “This process will cost Rs 150 million to be approved by the Central Development Working Party (CDWP) which is to meet on October 19.”

    This will not only help select suitable sites, but also help economise the cost of nuclear power plants through cost effective design parameters. The studies will enable the PAEC to obtain an early site permit from the Pakistan Nuclear Regulatory Authority, leading to a considerable reduction in the implementation period as qualification of sites and determination of design-based parameters take several years.

    “The objectives of the site selection are (i) to determine all natural and man-induced hazards at a site which could jeopardise the safety of a nuclear power plant (ii) reject a site if an engineering solution is not available to mitigate the effects of any hazard and (iii) establish design-based parameters.

    At present the PAEC is operating two nuclear power plants in the country that include the 137MW Karachi Nuclear Power Plant (KANUPP) and the 325MW Chashma Nuclear Power Plant-1 (ChashNuPP-1). Another 325 MW ChashNuPP-2 is under construction at the Chashma site with the help of China, which will be connected to the national grid in 2011.

    Pakistan’s first nuclear power plant, KANUPP, completed its design life of 30 years in 2002. After carrying out, major upgradation and re-licensing work in 2003, the plant was made operational in September 2003. It operated smoothly until December 12, 2005 when it was again shut down, and re-licensing plant’s operational life will be extended up to 2017. The design life of the plants at Chashma is 40 years.

    http://www.southasianmedia.net/index_story.cfm?id=333129&category=Frontend&Country=PAKISTAN
     
  4. Neo

    Neo RETIRED

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    Oops Joey...I accidently eddited your post instead of replying. :oops:
    Guess I was having a blond moment..:lol:
    Hope you forgive me for that...:cry:
     
  5. Neo

    Neo RETIRED

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    But here's the answer to the question you raised.

    Q: Why isn't Pakistan going for 500MW or 1000MW designs?

    A:The first batch of six 300MW reactor has been selected carefully with full cooperation of the Chinese for couple of reasons.
    Main reason is that China is expanding its nuclear infrastructure and simply doesn't have the capacity to export bigger design at this moment.
    The Chinese 1.000MW reactor is still undergoing tests. I believe it has to go critical yet but I could be wrong.
    Master FX, Officer of Engeneer or Highsea might have give you update on this.
    Untill the 1.000MW reactor is fully tested and operational it won't be exported.

    Pakistan is in talks with Russia, Germany and France for 1.000MW NPP's but all depends on the approval of USA which is unlikely to be provided anytime soon.
     
  6. joey

    joey SENIOR MEMBER

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    No problems Neo no hard feelings ;) it wasnt a big post afterall :P

    i see as far as i know russia is building 1000 Mw reactors in india for civilian use...have already started building.
    but still 500MW is better than 300....less area more output.
     
  7. Neo

    Neo RETIRED

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    Cool, thanks for not killing me! :P
    Sure, we need the capacity and will be looking into possibilities to get more powerfull reactors.
    Problem here is not the money nor the political will but the logistics.
    These reactors won't be ready before 2015, average time to build it is five years. A lot can happen inbetween.
    If China can deliver, we'll certainly buy them.
     
  8. Neo

    Neo RETIRED

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    Friday, November 03, 2006

    China to seek nuclear favours for Pakistan

    By Khalid Hasan

    WASHINGTON: The 45-member Nuclear Suppliers Group, which will need to make a country-specific exception for India as part of a series of steps to finalise the Indo-US nuclear cooperation agreement, may be asked by China to make a similar exception for Pakistan, according to former United States deputy secretary of state Strobe Talbott.

    Addressing a joint meeting with former Indian external affairs minister Jaswant Singh at the John Hopkins University, Talbott said that this is what he had gathered during his meeting with Chinese officials on a recent visit to that country. Singh, who held the foreign affairs portfolio under the Vajpayee government and had held 13 meetings with Talbott to get the Indo-US strategic dialogue rolling, said that at one point during the Kargil war, India noted a movement of Pakistani missiles near Jehlum but had come to the conclusion that the redeployment was of a diversionary nature and that it would therefore be erroneous for India to respond in kind.

    He said that there was no alternative to peace with Pakistan, while pointing out that it was not “state actors” who caused India concern, but non-state actors who posed the greater danger. Aside from fears that they could gain access to weapons of mass destruction, he noted that they would need no more than a glass full of some lethal biological compound to cause untold havoc.

    Talbot told the meeting, which included a question-answer interlude, that while the US was negotiating with India, it was carrying out a parallel dialogue with Pakistan. US experts during the 1999 Kargil conflict, he disclosed, were apprehensive of things getting out of hand, given that both countries were nuclear powers and had an unsettled dispute over Kashmir. He said that when former president Bill Clinton had taken Nawaz Sharif aside during the latter’s July 4 visit to Washington, and told him of certain military movements in Pakistan, the then Pakistani prime minister had no idea to what he was referring.

    As this point, Singh said that Pakistan had done the right thing by reversing its strategy of occupying certain posts in Kargil. He also said that Kargil represented a “watershed” in Indo-US relations. It was the first time, he said, that Washington had “recognised ground reality”. India had taken immediate note of America taking a “moral stand” and pressing Pakistan to withdraw from Kargil, he added. Talbott said that while India and the US had put the Cold War behind them and entered into a growing strategic relationship, their nuclear disagreements were not yet behind them. As a result, he said that Indo-US relations might be conducted on a narrower band than the commonality of their interests would warrant. However, he was confident that the Indo-US nuclear agreement would come through Congress this year. He conceded that some congressional actions would trouble India. He said that the difficulty with the nuclear deal, which is hanging fire in Congress, was that if India were granted exception under the Non-proliferation Treaty (NPT), one could not remain confident that New Delhi alone would remain the exception.

    He noted that President George W Bush had granted India that exception. Thus the question remained: who else was going to demand the same exception? Already some countries had raised their hands. Such factors were already at work in Northeast Asia and the Middle East. From a rule-based regime, a shift had been made in favour of a regime based on value judgments. Current thinking dictated that good countries deserved leniency and bad countries needed extra stringency. But the problem, he stressed, was that bad countries did not think that they were bad, one example being North Korea.

    Answering a question about the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), Talbott said that the US Senate’s failure to ratify the treaty represented a “black day” for the cause of non-proliferation. This, he said, provided an example of one branch of the US government knocking out the light from under another branch.

    In answer to another question, the former Indian external affairs minister said that he did not hold US policy towards Pakistan favourably. But he agreed, however, that India lived in a troubled neighbourhood and should not expect Washington to pull its chestnuts out of the fire. It was an Indian problem, he said, and India should settle it by managing its relations with its neighbours.

    Noting that India had unsettled land disputes with both Pakistan and China, he complained that the US “bolsters up” Pakistan, encouraging it to want to “box above its weight”. But when Pakistan “flounders”, it creates a difficult situation for India. Washington, he stressed, should not act as an “external equaliser” in the region, adding it was India that often paid the price for US policy in South Asia.

    But he went on to note that when confronted with the Kargil conflict, Washington had broken out of its “zero-sum mentality,” declaring that it was the US, India and China that now formed a triangle, the lines of which were no longer fuzzy. Replying to a question on Pakistan, Singh said that Islamabad needed to change. It needed democracy and needed to address the problem of radical groups operating on its soil. All states in the region, not just India, had the right to feel secure, he added.

    http://www.dailytimes.com.pk/default.asp?page=2006\11\03\story_3-11-2006_pg7_24
     
  9. ahf_nuke1

    ahf_nuke1 FULL MEMBER

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    If pakistan will go for these reactors do they have still any institues and training facilities to run them safely as far as i knw we dont have any waste management facilities in pakistan yet I think they should consider everything which i think they will be but still do pakistan have enough man power to run these reactors yet ?
     
  10. joey

    joey SENIOR MEMBER

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    Ofcourse it does, these are for electricity not making bombs.
    it will earn GOP profit from electricity, but i think 300Mw is too low.

    and btw have Pakistan yet designed any reactor?
     
  11. Neo

    Neo RETIRED

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    No, we haven't designed a reactor yet but the French abandoned Chasma NPP was completed by Pakistani technicians, engeneers and scientists.
    Again this would not have been possible without Chinese assistance.

    I'm sure we've learnt a great deal from this experience and we'll be designing our own reactors in near future.
     
  12. TomCat111

    TomCat111 FULL MEMBER

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    Khushab reactor is said to be designed and built by Pakistani scientists and engineers. Of course, ruling out Chinese assistance would be naive.
     
  13. Neo

    Neo RETIRED

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    IAEA approves Chasnupp-2 safeguard accord

    ISLAMABAD (November 25 2006): The 35-member Board of Governors of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) on Thursday unanimously approved the agreement between Pakistan and IAEA for application of safeguards on Chashma Nuclear Power Plant Unit-2 (Chasnupp-2). Similar safeguards agreement is also in place for Chasnupp-1.

    The approval of the agreement is a success for Pakistan and recognition of its non-proliferation commitments, says a press release issued by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs here on Friday.

    Chasnupp-2 is part of Pakistan's "Energy Security Plan", that envisages an increase in nuclear power generation from the current 425 MW to 8800 MW by the year 2030 to meet its growing energy demands. The Chasnupp-2 is being constructed with the assistance of the People's Republic of China. Pakistan is one of the only three non-NPT member states that enjoy the right of concluding such a safeguard agreement.
     
  14. Neo

    Neo RETIRED

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    HMC chalks out business plan to make nuclear power plants
    MUSHTAQ GHUMMAN

    ISLAMABAD (November 26 2006): The Heavy Mechanical Complex (HMC), Pakistan's public sector entity, is planning to manufacture nuclear power plants and equipment to meet domestic requirements and export, informed sources told Business Recorder.

    "Nuclear power plants will come up after 10 years, however, the HMC would commence manufacturing work after three to four years in accordance with the co-operative arrangements with the Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC)," the sources added.


    Sources said the HMC has formulated a five-year business plan, according to which the company would make heavy investment in manufacturing of engineering goods to meet local requirements and export to Middle East, African countries, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka and Indonesia.

    According to the up-gradation, the expansion and business plans, the HMC would also manufacture high pressure bagasse-fired boilers in sugar industry for co-generation, fluidised bed coal-fired boilers for industrial use and power generation, coal gasification plants for domestic use, small hydropower plants, thermal power plants, utility and heat recovery boilers, balance of plant equipment and wind power generation equipment.

    The entity would also prepare oil and gas refining/processing plants, fertiliser plants equipment, road construction machines, namely vibratory road rollers, asphalt plants, earth-moving machinery, bulldozers, seismic and water drilling rigs and high wear and heat resistant alloy castings.

    Sources said the HMC has asked the government to provide required funding for technology acquiring, BMRE and human resource otherwise it would not be able to sustain its operations for long under the present condition.

    Meanwhile, a meeting was held on Saturday with Industries and Production Minister Jahangir Khan Tareen in the chair to discuss HMC business plan.

    After a detailed discussion the minister tasked the HMC, the Engineering Development Board (EDB) and the Technology Upgradation and Skill Development Company (Tusdec) to formulate a comprehensive business plan for up-gradation by January 15.

    "We need to upgrade the HMC to capture opportunities coming from a spur in business activities as more and more investment is coming into Pakistan," says a press release issued by the ministry.

    A detailed presentation was given to the minister about objectives, status, sector-wise sales share, domestic market situation, export market, emerging business sectors, forthcoming active projects, active project investment plan, BMRE requirements, technology acquisition/development, training, and requirement of professionals.

    It was also informed that annual average turnover of the HMC has reached Rs 1 billion, and major business has mostly come from the sugar sector.

    The chairman, State Engineering Corporation (SEC), was of the view that to achieve the objective, the HMC would have to enter new high value-added business sectors by carrying out BMRE, acquiring new technologies and addition of professionals.

    Among others, Industries Secretary Shahab Khawaja, Engineering Development Board CEO, Tusdec chairman, SEC chairman, HMC managing director, and other senior officers of the ministry attended the meeting.

    http://www.brecorder.com/index.php?id=501405&currPageNo=1&query=&search=&term=&supDate=
     
  15. Keysersoze

    Keysersoze SENIOR MEMBER

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    Hmmm a nuclear fusion reactor at a fraction of the 12 billion plus that the EU is spending on a similar research project.......wonder what they know that no one else does???