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China looks to strengthen its strategic tie-ups in Middle East to replace US

beijingwalker

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China looks to strengthen its strategic tie-ups in Middle East to replace US
Feb 17, 2022 12:59 IST

Ottawa [Canada], February 17 (ANI): Finding it a "great opportunity", China is seeking to strengthen its strategic tie-ups in the Middle East in the fields of energy, technology, and infrastructure, as the United States is uprooting itself from the whole middle eastern region after investing heavily in the region.

In January this year alone, senior representatives from Arab countries including Saudi Arabia, Iran and Turkey, have visited China to discuss investments in security technology, infrastructure and energy resources including oil, a Canada-based think tank, International Forum for Rights and Security (IFFRAS) said on Wednesday.

Saudi Arabia's Faisal bin Farhan Al Saud was the first foreign minister who came come to China, as per IFFRAS.

A meeting between Faisal Al Saud and Wang Yi, Foreign Minister and State Councillor was held in Wuxi, Jiangsu province of East China on January 10 where the two nations expressed their great interest in each other's Marquee schemes such as "Vision 2030" and "Green Middle East" of Saudi Arabia and "Belt and Road Initiative" of China.

While other foreign Ministers who visited China last month were Kuwait's Sheikh Ahmad Nasser Al-Mohammad Al-Sabah, Oman's Sayyid BadrAlbusaidi and Bahrain's Dr Abdullatif bin Rashid Al-Zayani, IFFRAS reported adding that analysts believe that these meetings may pave the way for a China-GCC FTA (Free Trade Agreements).

Experts believe that these visits of Foreign Ministers might prove to be a symbiotic relationship where both China and the Middle East can develop mutual cooperation. Apart from physical visits, there have been many virtual meetings as well between the Arab nations and China.

To boost its relationship with the Middle East, China has also contributed greatly in COVID-19 pandemic times. China's pharmaceutical juggernaut, Sinopharm has developed a local COVID vaccine manufacturing plant in the KIZAD zone of UAE, according to IFFRAS.

Meanwhile, there have also been talks among China and Iran to revive the 2015 Iranian Nuclear Deal.

In a report by New York Times, analysts claim that in a larger picture, China's reluctance in engaging in regional politics unlike the US could prove to be deleterious for Sino-Arab relations.

 

beijingwalker

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China starts to sketch new Middle East architecture​

By CARICE WITTE AND DALE ALUF
FEBRUARY 18, 2022

XxjpsgC007447_20220110_PEPFN0A001.jpeg

Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi with Saudi Arabia's Foreign Minister Prince Faisal bin Farhan Al Saud in Jiangsu on January 10, 2022. Photo: Xinhua

As America recalibrates its terms of engagement with the Middle East, China has gradually been expanding its influence in ways that could alter the very character of the regional order.

The burst of diplomatic activity between China and Middle Eastern countries that garnered widespread media attention in January this year is emblematic of this trend.

At the same time, China wishes to portray itself as a different kind of great power. Shortly after the flurry of diplomatic activity, Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi told the press that “there is never a ‘power vacuum,'” in the Middle East “and there is no need of ‘patriarchy from outside.'”

Wang was sure to mention that “the region is suffering from long-existing unrest and conflicts due to foreign interventions,” alluding to the long-held belief among Chinese officials and policymakers that America’s presence in the region has been a destabilizing force.

China’s state-led media apparatus has been helping to reinforce these perceptions. In a Global Times article covering recent developments between China and the region, Zhang Han wrote that “the US continuously cultivates the region for its own interests and plants the seeds of democracy, creating chaos and conflicts.” By contrast, “China has no enemies, only friends in Middle East,” proclaimed Zhang.

Chinese officials have traditionally been reluctant to challenge the US in the Middle East, primarily because America has been providing the security protecting China’s interests. Against the backdrop of renewed great power competition and the perception that the US is withdrawing its security support, Beijing’s calculations seem to have changed.

Being scholars of history, Chinese officials have long been wary not to get sucked into what many on the mainland view as a “chaotic and dangerous graveyard burying empires.” China’s approach to the region has accordingly been consistently cautious, drawing on the principles of strategic hedging. Beijing has sought to foster cordial relations with all countries in the region, establish deep economic ties, garner political capital and gradually accrue leverage and influence.

map1.png
Interests run deep

Beijing’s interests in the region today run deep. China depends on the Middle East to secure roughly half the energy it needs to fuel its continuous development and is increasingly relying on countries like Qatar to ensure a steady supply of natural gas to the mainland.

The East Asian giant’s trade with the Gulf states surpassed $200 billion last year, making it the leading partner for the oil-rich region. Meanwhile, it’s estimated that as much as 60% of China’s exports to Middle Eastern countries transits the United Arab Emirates.

Over in the Levant, China is the largest source of imports for Egypt, Israel and Lebanon, and the second largest for Turkey, Syria, and Jordan. In just two decades, the value of China’s exports to these six countries increased almost twelve-fold, from $4.2 billion in 2000 to $53.4 billion in 2020.

Countries across the region have enlisted the likes of Huawei and Alibaba to construct everything from smart cities and renewable energy infrastructure to fifth-generation telecommunication networks.

As America withdrew its troops from Afghanistan in 2021, China doubled down on economic cooperation. According to a recent report on China’s Belt and Road Initiative investment by Fudan University’s Green Finance & Development Center, “Arab and Middle Eastern countries saw investment increase by about 360% and construction engagement increase by 116%” compared with 2020.

Syria has recently signed a Belt & Road cooperation agreement with Beijing while Morocco inked an implementation plan for the initiative with Beijing. Those moves suggest that such engagement will continue to increase throughout 2022.

Security architecture​

China has not been absent from influencing the regional security architecture, albeit modestly. Beijing understands that it needs to protect shipments of goods and oil traveling through critical maritime chokepoints en route to China and prevent “terrorism, separatism, and extremism” from spilling over its borders.

To that end, China’s navy has been active in the Gulf of Aden since 2008, and its military base in Djibouti has been expanded and upgraded to host aircraft carriers. Reports that China has been sending special forces units to Syria have surfaced since 2017, and joint military exercises between China, Russia, and Iran this past January have become commonplace.

Last year, Chinese President Xi Jinping announced that Iran would become a full member of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization. Wishing to maintain its delicate regional balancing, Beijing was sure to include China’s other friends in the club, admitting Saudi Arabia, Egypt and Qatar as dialogue partners.

Recent reports note that China is helping Saudi Arabia advance its ballistic missile program while pursuing the $400 billion 25-year strategic partnership with Iran – another sign of Beijing’s desire to maintain a balanced approach to the region.

Century-old US model​

Despite China’s nascent but growing regional military presence, Beijing seems to want to maintain its focus on economics while letting others, particularly Russia, provide security guarantees. According to Zhang, “Russia has been a notable presence in the Middle East, especially on Syria.” He added that “close coordination between China and Russia can avoid policy contradictions and stabilize the region.”

China in the Middle East today parallels America’s position in the region in the late 1920s when Britain and France were the dominant foreign military powers. Over the subsequent quarter-century, European power waned. The US stepped in as the dominant force in the Middle East, protecting the interests it had cultivated and nurtured during the previous four decades.

While the world is vastly different today, the need for great powers to advance national interests in the Middle East remains a compelling force that could see China reshaping the Middle East’s regional architecture.


China starts to sketch new Middle East architecture​

By CARICE WITTE AND DALE ALUF
FEBRUARY 18, 2022

XxjpsgC007447_20220110_PEPFN0A001.jpeg

Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi with Saudi Arabia's Foreign Minister Prince Faisal bin Farhan Al Saud in Jiangsu on January 10, 2022. Photo: Xinhua

As America recalibrates its terms of engagement with the Middle East, China has gradually been expanding its influence in ways that could alter the very character of the regional order.

The burst of diplomatic activity between China and Middle Eastern countries that garnered widespread media attention in January this year is emblematic of this trend.

At the same time, China wishes to portray itself as a different kind of great power. Shortly after the flurry of diplomatic activity, Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi told the press that “there is never a ‘power vacuum,'” in the Middle East “and there is no need of ‘patriarchy from outside.'”

Wang was sure to mention that “the region is suffering from long-existing unrest and conflicts due to foreign interventions,” alluding to the long-held belief among Chinese officials and policymakers that America’s presence in the region has been a destabilizing force.

China’s state-led media apparatus has been helping to reinforce these perceptions. In a Global Times article covering recent developments between China and the region, Zhang Han wrote that “the US continuously cultivates the region for its own interests and plants the seeds of democracy, creating chaos and conflicts.” By contrast, “China has no enemies, only friends in Middle East,” proclaimed Zhang.

Chinese officials have traditionally been reluctant to challenge the US in the Middle East, primarily because America has been providing the security protecting China’s interests. Against the backdrop of renewed great power competition and the perception that the US is withdrawing its security support, Beijing’s calculations seem to have changed.

Being scholars of history, Chinese officials have long been wary not to get sucked into what many on the mainland view as a “chaotic and dangerous graveyard burying empires.” China’s approach to the region has accordingly been consistently cautious, drawing on the principles of strategic hedging. Beijing has sought to foster cordial relations with all countries in the region, establish deep economic ties, garner political capital and gradually accrue leverage and influence.

map1.png
Interests run deep

Beijing’s interests in the region today run deep. China depends on the Middle East to secure roughly half the energy it needs to fuel its continuous development and is increasingly relying on countries like Qatar to ensure a steady supply of natural gas to the mainland.

The East Asian giant’s trade with the Gulf states surpassed $200 billion last year, making it the leading partner for the oil-rich region. Meanwhile, it’s estimated that as much as 60% of China’s exports to Middle Eastern countries transits the United Arab Emirates.

Over in the Levant, China is the largest source of imports for Egypt, Israel and Lebanon, and the second largest for Turkey, Syria, and Jordan. In just two decades, the value of China’s exports to these six countries increased almost twelve-fold, from $4.2 billion in 2000 to $53.4 billion in 2020.

Countries across the region have enlisted the likes of Huawei and Alibaba to construct everything from smart cities and renewable energy infrastructure to fifth-generation telecommunication networks.

As America withdrew its troops from Afghanistan in 2021, China doubled down on economic cooperation. According to a recent report on China’s Belt and Road Initiative investment by Fudan University’s Green Finance & Development Center, “Arab and Middle Eastern countries saw investment increase by about 360% and construction engagement increase by 116%” compared with 2020.

Syria has recently signed a Belt & Road cooperation agreement with Beijing while Morocco inked an implementation plan for the initiative with Beijing. Those moves suggest that such engagement will continue to increase throughout 2022.

Security architecture​

China has not been absent from influencing the regional security architecture, albeit modestly. Beijing understands that it needs to protect shipments of goods and oil traveling through critical maritime chokepoints en route to China and prevent “terrorism, separatism, and extremism” from spilling over its borders.

To that end, China’s navy has been active in the Gulf of Aden since 2008, and its military base in Djibouti has been expanded and upgraded to host aircraft carriers. Reports that China has been sending special forces units to Syria have surfaced since 2017, and joint military exercises between China, Russia, and Iran this past January have become commonplace.

Last year, Chinese President Xi Jinping announced that Iran would become a full member of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization. Wishing to maintain its delicate regional balancing, Beijing was sure to include China’s other friends in the club, admitting Saudi Arabia, Egypt and Qatar as dialogue partners.

Recent reports note that China is helping Saudi Arabia advance its ballistic missile program while pursuing the $400 billion 25-year strategic partnership with Iran – another sign of Beijing’s desire to maintain a balanced approach to the region.

Century-old US model​

Despite China’s nascent but growing regional military presence, Beijing seems to want to maintain its focus on economics while letting others, particularly Russia, provide security guarantees. According to Zhang, “Russia has been a notable presence in the Middle East, especially on Syria.” He added that “close coordination between China and Russia can avoid policy contradictions and stabilize the region.”

China in the Middle East today parallels America’s position in the region in the late 1920s when Britain and France were the dominant foreign military powers. Over the subsequent quarter-century, European power waned. The US stepped in as the dominant force in the Middle East, protecting the interests it had cultivated and nurtured during the previous four decades.

While the world is vastly different today, the need for great powers to advance national interests in the Middle East remains a compelling force that could see China reshaping the Middle East’s regional architecture.

 

beijingwalker

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You can never replace Americans.
Never say never, we'll see, the west used to say China couldn't achieve many things in the past, but China just did them with ease. As long as China can become the top economy in the world, everything else will naturally come with it one by one.
 
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MultaniGuy

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Never say never, we'll see, the west used to say China could achieve many things in the past, but China just did them with ease. As long as China can become the top economy in the world, everything else will naturally come with it one by one.
We wish best for China.

Unfortunately, Saudi Arabia still has very close relations with USA.

Only if China can offer more than what USA can, Saudi Arabia will choose China over USA.
 

Qutb-ud-din-Aibak

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We wish best for China.

Unfortunately, Saudi Arabia still has very close relations with USA.

Only if China can offer more than what USA can, Saudi Arabia will choose China over USA.

KSA has neutral stance in the cold war 2.0 and They were invited to Xi's party in the winter olympics meaning good ties. KSA doesn't want to be part an anti-camp because china is one of its biggest customers and good relations with China is important for them
 
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AViet

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You can never replace Americans.

Not for now, but it is the step in preparation for the future.

50 years later, whether the US can exist in its current form is still in question.

Look like the world, after shaking by the rise of Anglo-Saxons in last 300 years, will gradually turn back to its original power order. Europe and East Asia will once again become the leading dogs, while the US, together with other multicultural American countries are slowly becoming underdogs.

However, there will be some small changes. In Europe, Anglo countries who adopt the liberal, multicultural approach may gradually fall behind East European countries, who still keep their countries unchanged culturally.
 

zartosht

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China needs to understand that the saudi relations with the US is simply unbreakable. the saud clan that was installed by the british literally have put their family name on the "country"

The Americans replaced the british, and have absolute dominance. The saudi king is a de facto governor that can easily be replaced by washington. The CIA is heavily entrenched in this family cult "country"....

there are 10s of thousands of hungry princes that are absolutely ready to bend over for the local CIA agent for power.

if the local saudi "king" or "crown prince" in this situation gets too out of line, the CIA will easily organize a palace coup, and put another prince in charge.

add this to the fact that the saud monarchy are a bunch of money worshipping cowards. There is no way in hell that any saudi governor would risk everything by angering their US overlord....

Keep selling them missiles though. The US would never sell them real weaponry. The only way they can hit Tehran now isnt thru 100s of billions of american trash, but the few missiles supplied by china.
 

Oublious

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Never say never, we'll see, the west used to say China couldn't achieve many things in the past, but China just did them with ease. As long as China can become the top economy in the world, everything else will naturally come with it one by one.


It is not economy, you will need go for war. What America made America is the warmachine within, every fakin conflict you can see America over the world. Money doesn't change things, power projection is the key.
 

beijingwalker

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It is not economy, you will need go for war. What America made America is the warmachine within, every fakin conflict you can see America over the world. Money doesn't change things, power projection is the key.
What US has is backed by its economy, if this economic backing is gone, everything will be gone with it one after another, everyone can see this simple fact.
 

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