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China is a growing threat to national security, U.S. companies and American workers, Competing with China not 'easy': U.S. Commerce Secretary says

beijingwalker

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China is a growing threat to national security, U.S. companies and American workers, Competing with China not 'easy': U.S. Commerce Secretary says​

PUBLISHED WED, NOV 30 20225:16 PM EST
Chelsey Cox
KEY POINTS
  • Commerce Secretary Gina Raimondo says China has prioritized its national security over economic growth and trade with other nations.
  • The Commerce Secretary says the country has forced the U.S. to defend its workers, businesses and those of its allies and partners.
  • Raimondo said China is attempting to game the global system by stacking Chinese representatives on international technology standard-setting bodies to promote the country’s values and spread its influence.
107009987-16438052872022-02-01t205126z_802130018_rc27bs9jvihp_rtrmadp_0_usa-infrastructure-broadband.jpeg

Commerce Secretary Gina Raimondo testifies before a Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., U.S., February 1, 2022.

Andrew Harnik | Reuters

It’s now clear to U.S. officials that China, once considered a possible economic and political ally, has become an emerging threat to national security, U.S. companies and American workers, Commerce Secretary Gina Raimondo said Wednesday.

“Over the past decade, China’s leaders have made clear that they do not plan to pursue political and economic reform and are instead pursuing an alternative vision of their country’s future,” Raimondo said in a speech at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. “China’s reprioritization away from economic growth toward national security and its assertive military behavior means that we have to rethink how we protect our national security interests while also promoting our interests in trade and investment.”

Raimondo said Chinese leaders have made it apparent over the last decade that “increasing the role of the state society and economy,” “constraining the free flow of capital” and “decoupling in technology areas of the future” is more important than political and economic reform.

“Probably most disturbingly is they’re accelerating their efforts to fuse economic and technology policies with their military ambitions,” Raimondo said. “And as China’s economy has grown in size and influence, so too, has its commitment to using nonmarket trade and investment practices in ways that are forcing us, compelling us, to defend United States businesses and workers and those of our allies and partners.”

Raimondo said China is attempting to game the global system by stacking Chinese representatives on international technology standard-setting bodies to promote the country’s values and spread its influence. She said it undermines good governance, puts U.S. companies at a disadvantage “and puts at risk many of our fundamental values, such as the free flow of information and data privacy.”

Raimondo’s speech comes about two weeks after President Joe Biden met for about three hours with Chinese President Xi Jinping before the G-20 summit in Indonesia where he objected to China’s growing aggression to neighboring Taiwan. The leaders pushed for a bilateral relationship amid rising tensions due to China’s intimidation of Taiwan.

Strict measures were implemented under the CHIPS and Science Act, signed into law by Biden in August, to ensure research and innovation investments “can never be used to benefit China’s military,” said Raimondo. The administration fears that semiconductor chips used to manufacture military equipment could be used against the U.S.

In October, the Biden administration imposed export restrictions on semiconductors manufactured in China by U.S. companies. The Commerce Department also issued license restrictions on the export of certain chips that can be used in modern weapons systems and barred U.S. citizens from working for China’s chip manufacturing industry.

Raimondo said the U.S. government seeks to outcompete China in shaping the global economy and defend against an “increasing and emerging array of practices” aimed at U.S. workers and businesses and posing a threat to national security.

“China today poses a set of growing challenges to our national security,” she said. “That is a fact. It’s deploying its military in ways that undermine the security of our allies and our partners and the free flow of global trade.”

But Raimondo also acknowledged that the U.S. benefits from the over $750 billion annual trade market with China, which is America’s third largest export market. Exports support over 750,000 American jobs among large and small industries, she said.

“We want to continue to promote trade, continue to promote investment. But in areas that have no potential to undermine our interests, our values, our national security, our economic security, and at the same time using every tool in our toolbox to protect our companies and counter unfair economic practices,” Raimondo said.

 
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beijingwalker

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U.S. Commerce secretary: Competing with China not 'easy'

By David Shepardson

December 1, 20226:00 AM GMT+8

WASHINGTON, Nov 30 (Reuters) - U.S. Commerce Secretary Gina Raimondo said on Wednesday Washington must do more to counter China while insisting the world's two largest economies should not isolate from each other.

Raimondo cited U.S. strengths like American universities, billions of dollars in government funding for semiconductors and research, and strong allies around the world as assets when competing with China.

"Despite all of these advantages -- and they are many -- competing effectively with China isn't going to be easy. It's going to take hard work and it's going to take the work of everyone, not just the government," Raimondo said at a speech at MIT.

She said the United States is "not seeking the decoupling in any way of our economy from that of China's."

She added that "cutting edge technology, that China wants to get its hands on to put into military capacity... We're not going to allow that."

The United States and China have sharply clashed in recent years. Raimondo laid out a detailed strategy to counter China in her speech.

"We are aiming to bolster our system of export controls, enhance our investment screening regimes, strengthen our supply chain resiliency, and develop innovative solutions to counter China's economic coercion and human rights abuses," Raimondo said.

The Chinese embassy in Washington did not immediately comment.

In October, the Commerce Department published a sweeping set of export controls, including measures tightly restricting Chinese access to U.S. chipmaking technology, vastly expanding its reach in its bid to slow Beijing's technological and military advances.

She said for too long America's export control strategy "was quite reactive" and had "focused on preventing China from expanding its technological capabilities after it accessed American intellectual property."

China firmly opposes U.S. export controls on semiconductor chips, arguing they hurt Chinese companies and commercial interests of U.S. exporters.

Raimondo told reporters on Tuesday the United States is working with allies on semiconductor tooling restrictions and hopes they "will take steps similar to ours."

Concerns about China helped convince the U.S. Congress to approve hefty funding for semiconductor research and manufacturing and advanced science.

Raimondo in September 2021 said China was preventing its domestic airlines from buying "tens of billions of dollars" of U.S.-manufactured Boeing (BA.N) airplanes. In September, Boeing said it would begin to remarket some 737 MAX jets earmarked for Chinese customers citing ongoing geopolitical tensions.

Raimondo said on Tuesday "we need to continue to do business with China and trade with China supports American jobs."

 

etylo

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The mere existence of the Chinese nation and Chinese race is a threat to these white bigots. Arrogant Americans think they own the world and indeed the universe.
 

SaadH

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Maybe for a few more dollars of profit extracted solely for rich elites and not willing to pay workers a liveable wage, western corporations and oligarchy shouldn't have propped up and built Chinese manufacturing and economy.

Now is too late.
 

etylo

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Maybe for a few more dollars of profit extracted solely for rich elites and not willing to pay workers a liveable wage, western corporations and oligarchy shouldn't have propped up and built Chinese manufacturing and economy.

Now is too late.
US never built anything in China, period, its just american losers BS of they saving China to satisify their ego of superiority over Chinese.


Top 15 investors in China to the end of 2014[1]
US$ billion%
Hong Kong746.946.5
British Virgin Islands141.88.8
Japan98.36.1
United States75.44.7
Singapore72.34.5
Taiwan61.23.8
South Korea59.93.7
Cayman Islands28.71.8
Germany23.91.5
Samoa23.41.5
United Kingdom19.21.2
Netherlands14.70.9
France13.60.9
Mauritius13.00.8
Macau11.90.7
Others200.812.5
Total1605.3100


The largest source of foreign direct investment in China is what economist Barry Naughton calls “the China circle”, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Macau. Among the three locations, Hong Kong has remained the largest source since the mid-1980s. Investment from developed countries like Japan and the United States constituted the second group for the period concerned. Naughton notes that as investment from Korea and Japan focused on northeastern part of China, it may have had a stimulating effect on the otherwise declining economy in the region.[17] In the 1960s and 1970s, Hong Kong and Taiwan had gone through a period of sustained growth based on manufacturing. As the local production costs began to rise in the 1980s, manufactures started to relocate their production to the recently available special economic zones in China. Naughton highlights the low transaction costs within the China circle as the key factor that facilitated the relocation of production to China and hence the inflow of capital. As the Hong Kong and Taiwan owners brought capital, management methods, and technology to industrialize southern China, their factories also absorbed the labor force from rural countryside, leading the labor force in Guangdong and Fujian to nearly double from 1985 to 2001.[18]


 
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