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China Chooses Sides In The Middle East

aryobarzan

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China Chooses Sides In The Middle East

March 30, 2021
Ilan I. Berman Senior Vice President of the American Foreign Policy Council in Washington, DC



China's geopolitical ambitions in the Middle East took a giant leap forward over the weekend, when Chinese and Iranian officials convened in Tehran to formally sign a massive new cooperation agreement. The summit, which took place during a state visit to the Islamic Republic by Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi, codifies a trend that has been in the works for some time: a major strategic alignment between Beijing and Tehran.

The broad contours of the arrangement have been known for months. Last summer, Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif revealed publicly that the country's parliament (or majles) was in the final stages of drafting a plan for long-term cooperation with the People's Republic of China (PRC). The notional agreement was a sprawling 25-year strategic accord valued at a staggering $400 billion, encompassing everything from Chinese involvement in Iran's telecom sector to closer collaboration between the militaries of the two countries. And while the full details of the "comprehensive strategic partnership" just codified by the Iranian and Chinese foreign ministers have yet to be disclosed, they appear to be more or less the same as those being considered back in June.

For Beijing, the accord represents a clear strategic coup. Through it, the PRC has received – among many other things – preferential access to a bevy of Iranian infrastructure projects, and secured new ports and naval facilities to accommodate its burgeoning regional trade and growing maritime presence. In exchange, China has formally assumed the role of the Islamic Republic's main global partner – and its economic lifeline in the face of any future pressure that might be marshalled by the U.S. or Europe.

Yet the agreement is also an indicator that China's regional footprint is shifting. Over the past half-decade, Beijing has focused intently on expanding its influence in the Middle East through economic investments, political support for regional regimes and even deepening contacts with local militaries. Some of that attention is unquestionably tied to the country's "Belt & Road Initiative," a broad web of infrastructure projects and trade deals through which Beijing is now seeking to remake the global order. But China's Mideast push is opportunistic as well; as the United States has progressively pulled back from regional affairs in recent years, it has left empty political space that the PRC has been only too happy to fill.

Up until now, however, China has taken pains to straddle the Middle East's deep sectarian divisions. Beijing's overtures to Shi'ite Iran, for instance, have historically been balanced by outreach to Sunni states such as Egypt, the United Arab Emirates, and Saudi Arabia. Those countries, in turn, benefited handsomely from massive Chinese investment, which has made them loathe to criticize China's brutal clampdown on its Uighur Muslim minority or to heed Washington's call about the need to choose sides in the emerging "great power competition" between the U.S. and the PRC.

Now, however, the new Sino-Iranian accord threatens to tip that balance. Through it, China's government seems to be sending the signal that Iran's clerical regime has become its regional partner of choice. The deal, while clearly designed to capitalize on Iran's current weakened state, also catapults the Islamic Republic to the very top of the PRC's regional agenda, and does so in a way that could end up significantly strengthening the current government in Tehran.

Beijing's bureaucrats will, of course, try to convince the region's Sunni regimes that nothing has changed. But officials in Riyadh, Abu Dhabi and other Middle Eastern capitals would be prudent to press China about the details of its new strategic alignment with the Islamic Republic. They should also be asking how, precisely, the PRC plans to remain a reliable partner for them, given its growing economic, political and military bonds to the country that serves as their regional nemesis.

 

Oracle

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China is biggest importer of KSA oil.
China invests every where, even Chinese mobile phones factories are in India as well , they will do the same in KSA.
 

aryobarzan

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China is biggest importer of KSA oil.
China invests every where, even Chinese mobile phones factories are in India as well , they will do the same in KSA.
The choice for China to choose a "strategic" partner in middle east was no brainer. Yes they do buy Arab oil, Yes they do sell stuff to the Arabs. After all who does not like money but to have a "Strategic" partner means:

Access to Iran's Independent oil and gas ( free from US influence)
Access to world's largest OIL and Gas reserves (Iran holds world's largest oil and gas reserves combined (BOE)
Access to Persian Gulf naval facilities of Iran
Access to European and Russian markets via Iran
Access to Europe via Pakistan, Iran, Turkey
Access to 85 million virgin markets of Iran
Access to most educated and cultured people of the region.

so Yup...Iran is more than a one pony horse show for China. Choice was easy..timing was important for both partners.
 

Char

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China Chooses Sides In The Middle East

March 30, 2021
Ilan I. Berman Senior Vice President of the American Foreign Policy Council in Washington, DC



China's geopolitical ambitions in the Middle East took a giant leap forward over the weekend, when Chinese and Iranian officials convened in Tehran to formally sign a massive new cooperation agreement. The summit, which took place during a state visit to the Islamic Republic by Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi, codifies a trend that has been in the works for some time: a major strategic alignment between Beijing and Tehran.

The broad contours of the arrangement have been known for months. Last summer, Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif revealed publicly that the country's parliament (or majles) was in the final stages of drafting a plan for long-term cooperation with the People's Republic of China (PRC). The notional agreement was a sprawling 25-year strategic accord valued at a staggering $400 billion, encompassing everything from Chinese involvement in Iran's telecom sector to closer collaboration between the militaries of the two countries. And while the full details of the "comprehensive strategic partnership" just codified by the Iranian and Chinese foreign ministers have yet to be disclosed, they appear to be more or less the same as those being considered back in June.

For Beijing, the accord represents a clear strategic coup. Through it, the PRC has received – among many other things – preferential access to a bevy of Iranian infrastructure projects, and secured new ports and naval facilities to accommodate its burgeoning regional trade and growing maritime presence. In exchange, China has formally assumed the role of the Islamic Republic's main global partner – and its economic lifeline in the face of any future pressure that might be marshalled by the U.S. or Europe.

Yet the agreement is also an indicator that China's regional footprint is shifting. Over the past half-decade, Beijing has focused intently on expanding its influence in the Middle East through economic investments, political support for regional regimes and even deepening contacts with local militaries. Some of that attention is unquestionably tied to the country's "Belt & Road Initiative," a broad web of infrastructure projects and trade deals through which Beijing is now seeking to remake the global order. But China's Mideast push is opportunistic as well; as the United States has progressively pulled back from regional affairs in recent years, it has left empty political space that the PRC has been only too happy to fill.

Up until now, however, China has taken pains to straddle the Middle East's deep sectarian divisions. Beijing's overtures to Shi'ite Iran, for instance, have historically been balanced by outreach to Sunni states such as Egypt, the United Arab Emirates, and Saudi Arabia. Those countries, in turn, benefited handsomely from massive Chinese investment, which has made them loathe to criticize China's brutal clampdown on its Uighur Muslim minority or to heed Washington's call about the need to choose sides in the emerging "great power competition" between the U.S. and the PRC.

Now, however, the new Sino-Iranian accord threatens to tip that balance. Through it, China's government seems to be sending the signal that Iran's clerical regime has become its regional partner of choice. The deal, while clearly designed to capitalize on Iran's current weakened state, also catapults the Islamic Republic to the very top of the PRC's regional agenda, and does so in a way that could end up significantly strengthening the current government in Tehran.

Beijing's bureaucrats will, of course, try to convince the region's Sunni regimes that nothing has changed. But officials in Riyadh, Abu Dhabi and other Middle Eastern capitals would be prudent to press China about the details of its new strategic alignment with the Islamic Republic. They should also be asking how, precisely, the PRC plans to remain a reliable partner for them, given its growing economic, political and military bonds to the country that serves as their regional nemesis.

China's intentions are very clear. Both Saudi Arabia and Turkey know what China wants, and China will also give Saudi Arabia and Turkey what they want.
 

The SC

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China Chooses Sides In The Middle East

March 30, 2021
Ilan I. Berman Senior Vice President of the American Foreign Policy Council in Washington, DC



China's geopolitical ambitions in the Middle East took a giant leap forward over the weekend, when Chinese and Iranian officials convened in Tehran to formally sign a massive new cooperation agreement. The summit, which took place during a state visit to the Islamic Republic by Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi, codifies a trend that has been in the works for some time: a major strategic alignment between Beijing and Tehran.

The broad contours of the arrangement have been known for months. Last summer, Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif revealed publicly that the country's parliament (or majles) was in the final stages of drafting a plan for long-term cooperation with the People's Republic of China (PRC). The notional agreement was a sprawling 25-year strategic accord valued at a staggering $400 billion, encompassing everything from Chinese involvement in Iran's telecom sector to closer collaboration between the militaries of the two countries. And while the full details of the "comprehensive strategic partnership" just codified by the Iranian and Chinese foreign ministers have yet to be disclosed, they appear to be more or less the same as those being considered back in June.

For Beijing, the accord represents a clear strategic coup. Through it, the PRC has received – among many other things – preferential access to a bevy of Iranian infrastructure projects, and secured new ports and naval facilities to accommodate its burgeoning regional trade and growing maritime presence. In exchange, China has formally assumed the role of the Islamic Republic's main global partner – and its economic lifeline in the face of any future pressure that might be marshalled by the U.S. or Europe.

Yet the agreement is also an indicator that China's regional footprint is shifting. Over the past half-decade, Beijing has focused intently on expanding its influence in the Middle East through economic investments, political support for regional regimes and even deepening contacts with local militaries. Some of that attention is unquestionably tied to the country's "Belt & Road Initiative," a broad web of infrastructure projects and trade deals through which Beijing is now seeking to remake the global order. But China's Mideast push is opportunistic as well; as the United States has progressively pulled back from regional affairs in recent years, it has left empty political space that the PRC has been only too happy to fill.

Up until now, however, China has taken pains to straddle the Middle East's deep sectarian divisions. Beijing's overtures to Shi'ite Iran, for instance, have historically been balanced by outreach to Sunni states such as Egypt, the United Arab Emirates, and Saudi Arabia. Those countries, in turn, benefited handsomely from massive Chinese investment, which has made them loathe to criticize China's brutal clampdown on its Uighur Muslim minority or to heed Washington's call about the need to choose sides in the emerging "great power competition" between the U.S. and the PRC.

Now, however, the new Sino-Iranian accord threatens to tip that balance. Through it, China's government seems to be sending the signal that Iran's clerical regime has become its regional partner of choice. The deal, while clearly designed to capitalize on Iran's current weakened state, also catapults the Islamic Republic to the very top of the PRC's regional agenda, and does so in a way that could end up significantly strengthening the current government in Tehran.

Beijing's bureaucrats will, of course, try to convince the region's Sunni regimes that nothing has changed. But officials in Riyadh, Abu Dhabi and other Middle Eastern capitals would be prudent to press China about the details of its new strategic alignment with the Islamic Republic. They should also be asking how, precisely, the PRC plans to remain a reliable partner for them, given its growing economic, political and military bonds to the country that serves as their regional nemesis.

So much wet dreams.. wake up buddy:

April 03, 2021

Saudi Arabia, China have established ‘comprehensive strategic partnership’

https://www.arabnews.com/node/1534636/saudi-arabia
 

CAPRICORN-88

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China deal in ME is purely economic and all about trade.

Its policy is pretty consistent has remained unchanged since the day China joined NAM.

She can the best mediator for peace in the ME region since all the parties trusted her neutrality unlike USA.

China have not or will not take side nor interfere with their internal affairs, all the ME nations including KSA, Israel and Iran acknowledged it.
 

FuturePAF

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The choice for China to choose a "strategic" partner in middle east was no brainer. Yes they do buy Arab oil, Yes they do sell stuff to the Arabs. After all who does not like money but to have a "Strategic" partner means:

Access to Iran's Independent oil and gas ( free from US influence)
Access to world's largest OIL and Gas reserves (Iran holds world's largest oil and gas reserves combined (BOE)
Access to Persian Gulf naval facilities of Iran
Access to European and Russian markets via Iran
Access to Europe via Pakistan, Iran, Turkey
Access to 85 million virgin markets of Iran
Access to most educated and cultured people of the region.

so Yup...Iran is more than a one pony horse show for China. Choice was easy..timing was important for both partners.
Not to mention it’s one step closer to making the PetroYuan a reality. The world currently has 1.78 Trillion barrels of proven Oil reserve. Iran and Venezuela combined plus China own reserves hold approx. 484 Billion of those barrels. Add on to that Russia and the Central Asia states proven oil reserves, and you have a grand total of nearly 600 Billion barrels of proven oil reserves; or more than a third of all global oil reserves. If they can surpass 50% of global oil reserves to be traded in their currency, they will have effectively ended the Pedro-dollar or make their currency and equal medium of exchange. This may also be why controlling the South China Sea is so important for China; 16-33 Billion more potential barrels of oil and nearly 14 trillion barrels of natural gas.


The new Iranian oil fields China could be developing may have up to 50 Billion barrels of oil.

As China makes deeper relations and investments with other nations, such as Iraq, Angola and Nigeria, as well as supplants traditional foreign partners like France in countries like Algeria and could make a big investment once things stabilize in places like Libya.

All this could shift a further 300 Billion to potentially be traded in Yuan; basically the half way mark.

considering how much finished products already exports to these countries, paying in yuan only makes sense.
 
Last edited:

GumNaam

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China's intentions are very clear. Both Saudi Arabia and Turkey know what China wants, and China will also give Saudi Arabia and Turkey what they want.
classic give and take as it should be in the international arena...unlike the neocon west where for them its only take take & take and give nothing back.
 

Tai Hai Chen

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China is a super power. Both Iran and KSA are Chinese client states. They are not super powers.
 

Char

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China is a super power. Both Iran and KSA are Chinese client states. They are not super powers.
You are talking nonsense again. For China, multilateral cooperation in the Middle East is the best, and multilateral balance is acceptable. The ultimate goal is to achieve peace in the Middle East and achieve interconnection between Asia and Europe. It is in the interest of every country in the region.
 

aryobarzan

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Not to mention it’s one step closer to making the PetroYuan a reality. The world currently has 1.78 Trillion barrels of proven Oil reserve. Iran and Venezuela combined plus China own reserves hold approx. 484 Billion of those barrels. Add on to that Russia and the Central Asia states proven oil reserves, and you have a grand total of nearly 600 Billion barrels of proven oil reserves; or more than a third of all global oil reserves. If they can surpass 50% of global oil reserves to be traded in their currency, they will have effectively ended the Pedro-dollar or make their currency and equal medium of exchange. This may also be why controlling the South China Sea is so important for China; 16-33 Billion more potential barrels of oil and nearly 14 trillion barrels of natural gas.


The new Iranian oil fields China could be developing may have up to 50 Billion barrels of oil.

As China makes deeper relations and investments with other nations, such as Iraq, Angola and Nigeria, as well as supplants traditional foreign partners like France in countries like Algeria and could make a big investment once things stabilize in places like Libya.

All this could shift a further 300 Billion to potentially be traded in Yuan; basically the half way mark.

considering how much finished products already exports to these countries, paying in yuan only makes sense.
A very good observation... 👍
Not to mention it’s one step closer to making the PetroYuan a reality. The world currently has 1.78 Trillion barrels of proven Oil reserve. Iran and Venezuela combined plus China own reserves hold approx. 484 Billion of those barrels. Add on to that Russia and the Central Asia states proven oil reserves, and you have a grand total of nearly 600 Billion barrels of proven oil reserves; or more than a third of all global oil reserves. If they can surpass 50% of global oil reserves to be traded in their currency, they will have effectively ended the Pedro-dollar or make their currency and equal medium of exchange. This may also be why controlling the South China Sea is so important for China; 16-33 Billion more potential barrels of oil and nearly 14 trillion barrels of natural gas.


The new Iranian oil fields China could be developing may have up to 50 Billion barrels of oil.

As China makes deeper relations and investments with other nations, such as Iraq, Angola and Nigeria, as well as supplants traditional foreign partners like France in countries like Algeria and could make a big investment once things stabilize in places like Libya.

All this could shift a further 300 Billion to potentially be traded in Yuan; basically the half way mark.

considering how much finished products already exports to these countries, paying in yuan only makes sense.
A very good observation... 👍
 

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