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China biggest threat for India’s strategic goals, says Air Force Chief

beijingwalker

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China biggest threat for India’s strategic goals, says Air Force Chief
'Our security scenario is primarily influenced by unstable neighbourhoods with unsettled borders, which could be a flashpoint in the future,' Chief of Air Force Air Chief Marshal V R Chaudhari said.

Written by Krishn Kaushik | New Delhi |
December 8, 2021 3:08:43 pm

VR-Chaudhari.jpg

The IAF chief asserted that in his assessment 'China poses a more significant and long-term challenge to realisation of India's strategic goals'. (File photo)


China poses the biggest threat to India in achieving its strategic goals and both China and Pakistan are developing their infrastructure for air power close to the Indian borders, Chief of Air Force Air Chief Marshal V R Chaudhari said Wednesday.

Chaudhari was addressing a seminar on India’s National Security Dynamics organised by the Centre for Air Power Studies. He added, “Our security scenario is primarily influenced by unstable neighbourhoods with unsettled borders, which could be a flashpoint in the future.”

“China’s hegemonic and sometimes entrapping policies can provide opportunities for India to leverage in both trade and military domains. Our alignments and posturing in the Indo-Pacific will have to be carefully regulated to ensure a favourable resolution, not only for us but for the region as whole,” he said.

He added that as China “continues to display its economic and military clout, its assertiveness is also bound to grow”.

On its growing imprint, he said, “We will surely increase contestation and competition in the economic domain. China will further tie us down by keeping us engaged on the unsettled borders. Its aggressive intent is visible with the rapid enhancement of PLAAF’s (People’s Liberation Army Air Force) operational infrastructure, in terms of hardened aircraft shelters and additional airfields in the Tibet Autonomous Region.”

“In terms of equipment, their Air force has forward positioned offensive air defence units along with fourth and fifth generation aircraft. The PLAAF is also using supersonic drones and employing them,” for intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance activities, he said. Similarly, he said, “force multipliers like their Rocket Force and their Strategic Force are redefining the contours of future warfare.”

India’s security dynamics involve multifaceted threats and challenges, Chaudhari said, adding, “It will require us to build multi-domain capabilities and execute all our operations simultaneously and in shorter timeframes. We have demonstrated those capabilities and resolve during the standoff in the northern borders while we are handling the national Covid-19 response, as well as responding operationally to inimical forces.”

He further said, “Both PLAAF and Pakistani Air Force (PAF) have significantly enhanced their military ability capability in terms of equipment and infrastructure to counter which, the Indian Air Force needs to rapidly modernise, expand its fleet and improve indigenous manufacturing capability.”

Regarding Pakistan, Chaudhari said, “On the Western Front, we continue to be in a no-war, no-peace situation and Pakistan is unlikely to change its Kashmir-oriented strategy in the foreseeable future and despite its own internal problems and economic weaknesses, it will continue to sponsor terrorism as a state policy.”

The PAF, he said, have formulated a new concept of warfighting — what they call the triple R: Rearticulate, Reorganise and Relocate — with an aim to stymie the Indian strategic aims. For this, Pakistan has continued to acquire and equip itself with the latest technology, aircraft as well as upgrade its Air Defence capabilities, he said.

He added, “Strategically they are making the transition from fighting a predominantly defensive war to adopting a more aggressive approach for an offensive-defence under the nuclear umbrella.” He mentioned that PAF has built 24 main and forward operating bases and around six satellite bases, which, he said “provides it greater flexibility and ability to influence battles across a larger spectrum and a larger volume of area.”

For the Indian Air Force, its chief said, “This translates into a need for higher quantum of counter-air efforts to ensure no interference of Pakistani Air Force and to gain the requisite control over air.”

Speaking about the larger security scenario, Chaudhari said, “Today we are witnessing a rapidly evolving world where the rules-based international order is increasingly being challenged by a complex multipolar world with little or no regard to rules or to the traditional processes of geopolitical interface.”

Diplomacy, economy and information, he said, are increasingly becoming the primary tools of engagement, with the military being used as a deterrent.

He mentioned that new domains like the cyber and space have emerged as the new battlefields.

“Coercion is the new strategy with the cyber, information and space domains becoming the new battlefields. We must reassess our strategic priorities and realign our actions to ensure that we don’t get left behind. In determining our strategic priorities, we must take cognizance of our purpose as a state. Assessment of our purpose has to take into account the people of India and the character of the Indian state.”

In an increasingly volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous geopolitical environment, he said, there is a strong linkage between security and development.

“Today we stand at the threshold of technological explosion that will have a disruptive effect on the way future wars are fought. These technologies will encompass conventional, kinetic means merged with non-kinetic, non-lethal means, spread across the cyber, info and space domains.”

But, the Air Force Chief said, “The conflicts in the last few decades have clearly established without doubt the pre-eminence of air power as an instrument of choice for almost all operational contingencies.”

He mentioned the budget will be a constraint for the Indian military and “prioritisation of procurement at the national level for key combat elements and enablers becomes very critical. We need training and equipment not to fight the last war but to fight and win tomorrow’s wars.”

He also called West Asia and North African very important regions for India strategy calculus.

He said, “India must explore the possibility of enhancing our collective strength by aligning with nations with common beliefs and values and as an economic powerhouse, with strong state institutions, India is viewed as an important strategic partner, in today’s world by many countries.”

For the future, he said India needs to be prepared for the “changes in methodology adopted by international elements in the domains of cyber and information warfare,” which permit the perpetrators to be located anywhere in the world “and execute their designs with impunity”. To counter them, India needs to “add new capabilities and harness modern technology, making it an integral part of our security apparatus” and it requires re-equipment, retraining and remodelling our security infrastructure.

“Above all, to provide an effective and timely response from these borderless threats, we need to integrate all our national security elements and make it an all-of-a-nation approach. Dealing with such threats calls for cooperation rather than compartmentalisation.”

He also termed climate change as another aspect of the new threat.

The IAF chief asserted that in his assessment “China poses a more significant and long-term challenge to realisation of India’s strategic goals”.

 

Beast

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I hope this India air force chief dont end up like CDS after so much lies from Bipin Rawat.

Karma will find its way for this big mouth or liar who lies for his own fame and personal status.
 

Bilal9

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On its growing imprint, he said, “We will surely increase contestation and competition in the economic domain.

Did not read the whole article TLDR.

However the Sanghi puffery above caught my attention.

Economically China now is at least two decades ahead of India in anything except maybe IT coolie things. But Chinese people do not need to be immigrants to other countries to either be IT coolies or real coolies. So the point is moot.

HOW EXACTLY do Indians plan to even APPROACH (FORGET OVERTURN) Chinese dominance economically?

Without any trolling comments (which this article surely deserves) - I don't see how. Lately - India's nominal per capita GDP is lower than Bangladesh.

If you say things without any concrete plan or evidence to back it up, then your credibility goes down to zero.

India is a sordid disorganized social mess of a country which only exists because of "Bhagwan ka kirpa" or divine providence. In 2021 - even more so.

Those who don't understand this, need to visit India and see for themselves.
 
Last edited:

Bilal9

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For the future, he said India needs to be prepared for the “changes in methodology adopted by international elements in the domains of cyber and information warfare,” which permit the perpetrators to be located anywhere in the world “and execute their designs with impunity”. To counter them, India needs to “add new capabilities and harness modern technology, making it an integral part of our security apparatus” and it requires re-equipment, retraining and remodelling our security infrastructure.

So - here is another gem.

He wants to "re-equip, retrain and remodel security infrastructure". With what?

It has already been seen that the few folks in India having enough brain-power to tackle China are few and far between, the Backoffice companies ran out of IIT level management talent really fast. Majority of IT workers in India have only basic IQ who took a four month prep course at the corner bazaar IT training center to become instant "experts". Forget using these folks to mount a counterpoint against Chinese information warfare. Not their fault, they are part of the Indian underclass, probably the first folks in their family to even get a higher education.

I also have severe doubts about the capability of Sanghis to organize and re-train human assets with any talent and remodel security infrastructure. India does not have the deep pockets like China to spend on security infra, forget about having homegrown hardware technology either.

@jamahir bhai am I off-base in my assessment here?
 

Thorough Pro

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When did he change?

China biggest threat for India’s strategic goals, says Air Force Chief
'Our security scenario is primarily influenced by unstable neighbourhoods with unsettled borders, which could be a flashpoint in the future,' Chief of Air Force Air Chief Marshal V R Chaudhari said.

Written by Krishn Kaushik | New Delhi |
December 8, 2021 3:08:43 pm

VR-Chaudhari.jpg

The IAF chief asserted that in his assessment 'China poses a more significant and long-term challenge to realisation of India's strategic goals'. (File photo)


China poses the biggest threat to India in achieving its strategic goals and both China and Pakistan are developing their infrastructure for air power close to the Indian borders, Chief of Air Force Air Chief Marshal V R Chaudhari said Wednesday.

Chaudhari was addressing a seminar on India’s National Security Dynamics organised by the Centre for Air Power Studies. He added, “Our security scenario is primarily influenced by unstable neighbourhoods with unsettled borders, which could be a flashpoint in the future.”

“China’s hegemonic and sometimes entrapping policies can provide opportunities for India to leverage in both trade and military domains. Our alignments and posturing in the Indo-Pacific will have to be carefully regulated to ensure a favourable resolution, not only for us but for the region as whole,” he said.

He added that as China “continues to display its economic and military clout, its assertiveness is also bound to grow”.

On its growing imprint, he said, “We will surely increase contestation and competition in the economic domain. China will further tie us down by keeping us engaged on the unsettled borders. Its aggressive intent is visible with the rapid enhancement of PLAAF’s (People’s Liberation Army Air Force) operational infrastructure, in terms of hardened aircraft shelters and additional airfields in the Tibet Autonomous Region.”

“In terms of equipment, their Air force has forward positioned offensive air defence units along with fourth and fifth generation aircraft. The PLAAF is also using supersonic drones and employing them,” for intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance activities, he said. Similarly, he said, “force multipliers like their Rocket Force and their Strategic Force are redefining the contours of future warfare.”

India’s security dynamics involve multifaceted threats and challenges, Chaudhari said, adding, “It will require us to build multi-domain capabilities and execute all our operations simultaneously and in shorter timeframes. We have demonstrated those capabilities and resolve during the standoff in the northern borders while we are handling the national Covid-19 response, as well as responding operationally to inimical forces.”

He further said, “Both PLAAF and Pakistani Air Force (PAF) have significantly enhanced their military ability capability in terms of equipment and infrastructure to counter which, the Indian Air Force needs to rapidly modernise, expand its fleet and improve indigenous manufacturing capability.”

Regarding Pakistan, Chaudhari said, “On the Western Front, we continue to be in a no-war, no-peace situation and Pakistan is unlikely to change its Kashmir-oriented strategy in the foreseeable future and despite its own internal problems and economic weaknesses, it will continue to sponsor terrorism as a state policy.”

The PAF, he said, have formulated a new concept of warfighting — what they call the triple R: Rearticulate, Reorganise and Relocate — with an aim to stymie the Indian strategic aims. For this, Pakistan has continued to acquire and equip itself with the latest technology, aircraft as well as upgrade its Air Defence capabilities, he said.

He added, “Strategically they are making the transition from fighting a predominantly defensive war to adopting a more aggressive approach for an offensive-defence under the nuclear umbrella.” He mentioned that PAF has built 24 main and forward operating bases and around six satellite bases, which, he said “provides it greater flexibility and ability to influence battles across a larger spectrum and a larger volume of area.”

For the Indian Air Force, its chief said, “This translates into a need for higher quantum of counter-air efforts to ensure no interference of Pakistani Air Force and to gain the requisite control over air.”

Speaking about the larger security scenario, Chaudhari said, “Today we are witnessing a rapidly evolving world where the rules-based international order is increasingly being challenged by a complex multipolar world with little or no regard to rules or to the traditional processes of geopolitical interface.”

Diplomacy, economy and information, he said, are increasingly becoming the primary tools of engagement, with the military being used as a deterrent.

He mentioned that new domains like the cyber and space have emerged as the new battlefields.

“Coercion is the new strategy with the cyber, information and space domains becoming the new battlefields. We must reassess our strategic priorities and realign our actions to ensure that we don’t get left behind. In determining our strategic priorities, we must take cognizance of our purpose as a state. Assessment of our purpose has to take into account the people of India and the character of the Indian state.”

In an increasingly volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous geopolitical environment, he said, there is a strong linkage between security and development.

“Today we stand at the threshold of technological explosion that will have a disruptive effect on the way future wars are fought. These technologies will encompass conventional, kinetic means merged with non-kinetic, non-lethal means, spread across the cyber, info and space domains.”

But, the Air Force Chief said, “The conflicts in the last few decades have clearly established without doubt the pre-eminence of air power as an instrument of choice for almost all operational contingencies.”

He mentioned the budget will be a constraint for the Indian military and “prioritisation of procurement at the national level for key combat elements and enablers becomes very critical. We need training and equipment not to fight the last war but to fight and win tomorrow’s wars.”

He also called West Asia and North African very important regions for India strategy calculus.

He said, “India must explore the possibility of enhancing our collective strength by aligning with nations with common beliefs and values and as an economic powerhouse, with strong state institutions, India is viewed as an important strategic partner, in today’s world by many countries.”

For the future, he said India needs to be prepared for the “changes in methodology adopted by international elements in the domains of cyber and information warfare,” which permit the perpetrators to be located anywhere in the world “and execute their designs with impunity”. To counter them, India needs to “add new capabilities and harness modern technology, making it an integral part of our security apparatus” and it requires re-equipment, retraining and remodelling our security infrastructure.

“Above all, to provide an effective and timely response from these borderless threats, we need to integrate all our national security elements and make it an all-of-a-nation approach. Dealing with such threats calls for cooperation rather than compartmentalisation.”

He also termed climate change as another aspect of the new threat.

The IAF chief asserted that in his assessment “China poses a more significant and long-term challenge to realisation of India’s strategic goals”.

 

Stranagor

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If an underdeveloped country begins to talk about external threats, it suggests governance crisis at home. Indian government trusts that the constituency will be mentally paralyzed by this enemy behind the door rhetoric and Ignore its own home-made miseries.
 

Bilal9

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If an underdeveloped country begins to talk about external threats, it suggests governance crisis at home. Indian government trusts that the constituency will be mentally paralyzed by this enemy behind the door rhetoric and Ignore its own home-made miseries.

They always bring up the bugaboo and fake alarm of "Chinese Invasion" or "Terrorists from Pakistan/Bangladesh" to deflect attention from their own piss poor economy, which is doing really badly at the moment. Laughable claims by BJP of 11% GDP growth are being mocked by their own media.

I think the puffery from the Indian armed services chiefs are a desperate attempt at BSing their own people, who are largely clueless.

First it was The Navy Chief (a disaster as we saw) and now this public proclamation from the AF chief bad mouthing China.

The pattern is to be like the US, where secretary of defense and army/navy chiefs pass this china-hate type of proclamation.

India should stop trying to be like the United States.

India is NOT the United States.

Cockroaches do fly at times, but they aren't birds.
 

faithfulguy

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They always bring up the bugaboo and fake alarm of "Chinese Invasion" or "Terrorists from Pakistan/Bangladesh" to deflect attention from their own piss poor economy, which is doing really badly at the moment. Laughable claims by BJP of 11% GDP growth are being mocked by their own media.

I think the puffery from the Indian armed services chiefs are a desperate attempt at BSing their own people, who are largely clueless.

First it was The Navy Chief (a disaster as we saw) and now this public proclamation from the AF chief bad mouthing China.

The pattern is to be like the US, where secretary of defense and army/navy chiefs pass this china-hate type of proclamation.

India should stop trying to be like the United States.

India is NOT the United States.

Cockroaches do fly at times, but they aren't birds.

India does the will of its masters from the west. It accepts its role as a slave. But it desires to keep its household slave role. It emulates its master. But everyone knows that it’s a pathetic slave trying to act like it’s master.
 

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