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China accuses US Navy of ‘cognitive warfare’ after ‘unusual’ photo emerges

Reashot Xigwin

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Taiwan and Japan Track China Warship Together in Apparent Team-up at Sea
By John Feng On 5/4/21 at 6:38 AM EDT



Senior defense officials in Taiwan were coy about the country's military collaboration with Japan when quizzed on Monday about satellite imagery showing an apparent joint surveillance operation of a Chinese warship in the East China Sea.
Defense Minister Chiu Kuo-cheng told reporters that Taiwan was cooperating with a number of friendly parties but said he could not disclose information about specific departments.

On Saturday, Japan's Defense Ministry said the People's Liberation Army (PLA) frigate Binzhou had passed through the Miyako Strait into the Western Pacific the day before. The Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force later deployed an Abukuma-class destroyer escort and two maritime patrol aircraft as the single Chinese warship traveled north via the narrow waters between Taiwan and Yonaguni, Japan's westernmost inhabited island, which lies less than 70 miles from Taiwan's east coast.

Satellite images dated May 1, however, revealed an additional detail not present in the announcement by the Japanese Defense Ministry—a Taiwanese warship also appeared to be in the vicinity, seemingly monitoring Binzhou as it returned to the East China Sea.

In the same frame, a Taiwanese navy Kee Lung-class destroyer can be seen sailing about 6 miles west of the Chinese and Japanese warships. Taipei's Apple Daily described it as the first joint surveillance operation between Taiwan and Japan.

Taiwan's defense officials, however, did not corroborate the newspaper's view that Taipei and Tokyo had collaborated over the weekend.
Defense Minister Chiu said Taiwan dispatches ships and aircraft to monitor any People's Liberation Army assets operating within designated areas.
"It's not about specific cooperation with any country. That's inappropriate [to disclose]," Chiu told reporters. "With regard to national defense, we will monitor whenever required."
In a recent report sent to Taiwan's lawmakers, the Defense Ministry said it was sharing intelligence with the American Institute in Taiwan (AIT)—the de facto U.S. embassy in Taipei—regarding Chinese navy movements in the Western Pacific and in the South China Sea.
Asked whether the ministry had shared Saturday's operations report with the AIT, Chiu said he was "not at liberty" to name specific departments.

His deputy, Chang Che-ping, offered a similar response when quizzed by lawmakers at a defense committee hearing, also on Monday. He offered no comment on reports supposing cooperation between Taiwanese and Japanese forces.
Chang confirmed that Taiwan had tasked a Kee Lung-class destroyer to shadow Binzhou, whose crew was likely on a training and intelligence-gathering mission. Chang said the vessel "did not pose a serious threat" to Taiwan's security.
The PLA warship's appearance in the Western Pacific on Friday coincided with the Chinese military flying five planes into Taiwan's air defense identification zone (ADIZ). According to Taipei's Defense Ministry, a Chinese Y-8 anti-submarine warfare aircraft crossed the Bashi Channel, south of the island, before turning back.

Lu Li-shih, an instructor with Taiwan's naval academy in the southern port city of Kaohsiung, said the warplane likely linked up with Binzhou for anti-submarine exercises.
Like the Miyako Strait, the Bashi Channel serves as one of the few international waterways the Chinese navy can use to exit the first island chain. Its additional strategic significance at the mouth of the South China Sea is often cited as the reason behind the PLA's increased warplane activity in the southwest corner of Taiwan's air defense zone.

Taiwan Navy Warship Conducts Missile Test

Republic of China (Taiwan) Navy Kee Lung-class guided-missile destroyer ROCS Ma Kong launches a surface-to-air missile during drills at sea near the east coast of Taiwan on September 26, 2013. Defense officials in Taiwan did not confirm a military collaboration with Japan when quizzed about satellite imagery showing an apparent joint surveillance operation. SAM YEH/AFP via Getty Images

 

antonius123

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Taiwan and Japan Track China Warship Together in Apparent Team-up at Sea
By John Feng On 5/4/21 at 6:38 AM EDT



Senior defense officials in Taiwan were coy about the country's military collaboration with Japan when quizzed on Monday about satellite imagery showing an apparent joint surveillance operation of a Chinese warship in the East China Sea.
Defense Minister Chiu Kuo-cheng told reporters that Taiwan was cooperating with a number of friendly parties but said he could not disclose information about specific departments.

On Saturday, Japan's Defense Ministry said the People's Liberation Army (PLA) frigate Binzhou had passed through the Miyako Strait into the Western Pacific the day before. The Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force later deployed an Abukuma-class destroyer escort and two maritime patrol aircraft as the single Chinese warship traveled north via the narrow waters between Taiwan and Yonaguni, Japan's westernmost inhabited island, which lies less than 70 miles from Taiwan's east coast.

Satellite images dated May 1, however, revealed an additional detail not present in the announcement by the Japanese Defense Ministry—a Taiwanese warship also appeared to be in the vicinity, seemingly monitoring Binzhou as it returned to the East China Sea.

In the same frame, a Taiwanese navy Kee Lung-class destroyer can be seen sailing about 6 miles west of the Chinese and Japanese warships. Taipei's Apple Daily described it as the first joint surveillance operation between Taiwan and Japan.

Taiwan's defense officials, however, did not corroborate the newspaper's view that Taipei and Tokyo had collaborated over the weekend.
Defense Minister Chiu said Taiwan dispatches ships and aircraft to monitor any People's Liberation Army assets operating within designated areas.
"It's not about specific cooperation with any country. That's inappropriate [to disclose]," Chiu told reporters. "With regard to national defense, we will monitor whenever required."
In a recent report sent to Taiwan's lawmakers, the Defense Ministry said it was sharing intelligence with the American Institute in Taiwan (AIT)—the de facto U.S. embassy in Taipei—regarding Chinese navy movements in the Western Pacific and in the South China Sea.
Asked whether the ministry had shared Saturday's operations report with the AIT, Chiu said he was "not at liberty" to name specific departments.

His deputy, Chang Che-ping, offered a similar response when quizzed by lawmakers at a defense committee hearing, also on Monday. He offered no comment on reports supposing cooperation between Taiwanese and Japanese forces.
Chang confirmed that Taiwan had tasked a Kee Lung-class destroyer to shadow Binzhou, whose crew was likely on a training and intelligence-gathering mission. Chang said the vessel "did not pose a serious threat" to Taiwan's security.
The PLA warship's appearance in the Western Pacific on Friday coincided with the Chinese military flying five planes into Taiwan's air defense identification zone (ADIZ). According to Taipei's Defense Ministry, a Chinese Y-8 anti-submarine warfare aircraft crossed the Bashi Channel, south of the island, before turning back.

Lu Li-shih, an instructor with Taiwan's naval academy in the southern port city of Kaohsiung, said the warplane likely linked up with Binzhou for anti-submarine exercises.
Like the Miyako Strait, the Bashi Channel serves as one of the few international waterways the Chinese navy can use to exit the first island chain. Its additional strategic significance at the mouth of the South China Sea is often cited as the reason behind the PLA's increased warplane activity in the southwest corner of Taiwan's air defense zone.

Taiwan Navy Warship Conducts Missile Test

Republic of China (Taiwan) Navy Kee Lung-class guided-missile destroyer ROCS Ma Kong launches a surface-to-air missile during drills at sea near the east coast of Taiwan on September 26, 2013. Defense officials in Taiwan did not confirm a military collaboration with Japan when quizzed about satellite imagery showing an apparent joint surveillance operation. SAM YEH/AFP via Getty Images


Of course, China is a threat toward both of Taiwan and Japan.
 

Reashot Xigwin

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China furious after US warship sails close to disputed Paracels
Beijing accuses US of entering its waters around islands also claimed by Vietnam and Taiwan without permission.


The USS Curtis Wilbur during 'freedom of navigation' operations in the South China Sea on May 20 [Courtesy of US Navy 7th Fleet]
20 May 2021

China has reacted with fury after the United States Navy sent a warship through waters in the disputed South China Sea near the Paracel Islands in a mission it said was to “assert” navigational rights and freedoms, but China said was illegal.
The Chinese military’s Southern Theatre Command said on Thursday the USS Curtis Wilbur had entered the waters without permission, and that its ships and planes followed the US vessel.
Keep reading
China says US threatens peace as warship crosses Taiwan StraitDuterte bans Philippines cabinet from speaking on South China SeaSpace: The new frontier for US-China rivalryUS, China need to dial back ‘unhelpful rhetoric’: Industry body
Spokesperson Tian Junli said the PLA had “expelled” the USS Curtis Wilbur, describing the US as a “true troublemaker”, state broadcaster CGTN reported.
China claims almost the entire South China Sea under its so-called nine-dash line that has been dismissed as without basis by the international tribunal at The Hague. Taiwan, as well as the littoral states of Vietnam, the Philippines, Brunei and Malaysia also claim all or parts of the sea.
In a statement, the US 7th fleet said the USS Curtis Wilbur, an Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer, sailed through the South China Sea “in the vicinity” of the Paracel Islands on May 20 in an operation to uphold the rights, freedoms, and lawful uses of the sea recognised under international law.
“Unlawful and sweeping maritime claims in the South China Sea pose a serious threat to the freedom of the seas, including the freedoms of navigation and overflight, free trade and unimpeded commerce and freedom of economic opportunity for South China Sea littoral nations,” the statement said.


The crew of the USS Curtis Wilbur stand watch on the bridge as its crosses waters in the South China Sea in the vicinity of the Spratly Islands [Courtesy of US Navy 7th Fleet]The South China Sea has emerged as a chief flashpoint in deteriorating relations between the US and China, with Washington rejecting Beijing’s claims in the strategic waterway where it has stepped up the construction of artificial islands and expanded rocky islets to establish military bases.

China, Taiwan, and Vietnam all claim sovereignty over the Paracel Islands, known as Xisha in China and Hoang Sa in Vietnam. The island chain lies about 400 kilometres (250 miles) east of Vietnam and 350 kilometres (220 miles) south of China.

The US Navy said all three require either permission or advance notification before a military vessel or warship engages in “innocent passage” through the territorial sea. Under the 1982 Law of the Sea Convention, the ships of all countries – including their warships – enjoy the right of innocent passage through the territorial sea, it added, saying that it had not sought prior notification or permission from any of the claimants.

The US has increased so-called “freedom of navigation” operations in recent years, not only in the South China Sea but also in the Taiwan Strait where the USS Curtis Wilbur sailed on Tuesday. China said that operation put “peace and stability” at risk.

“The United States upholds freedom of navigation as a principle,” the US Navy statement said, stressing that its operations were carried out in accordance with international law. It previously sent a warship – the USS John S McCain – close to the Paracels in February.

“As long as some countries continue to assert maritime claims that are inconsistent with international law as reflected in the 1982 Law of the Sea Convention and that purport to restrict unlawfully the rights and freedoms guaranteed to all States, the United States will continue to defend those rights and freedoms.”

China furious after US warship sails close to disputed Paracels
Beijing accuses US of entering its waters around islands also claimed by Vietnam and Taiwan without permission.


The USS Curtis Wilbur during 'freedom of navigation' operations in the South China Sea on May 20 [Courtesy of US Navy 7th Fleet]
20 May 2021

China has reacted with fury after the United States Navy sent a warship through waters in the disputed South China Sea near the Paracel Islands in a mission it said was to “assert” navigational rights and freedoms, but China said was illegal.
The Chinese military’s Southern Theatre Command said on Thursday the USS Curtis Wilbur had entered the waters without permission, and that its ships and planes followed the US vessel.
Keep reading
China says US threatens peace as warship crosses Taiwan StraitDuterte bans Philippines cabinet from speaking on South China SeaSpace: The new frontier for US-China rivalryUS, China need to dial back ‘unhelpful rhetoric’: Industry body
Spokesperson Tian Junli said the PLA had “expelled” the USS Curtis Wilbur, describing the US as a “true troublemaker”, state broadcaster CGTN reported.
China claims almost the entire South China Sea under its so-called nine-dash line that has been dismissed as without basis by the international tribunal at The Hague. Taiwan, as well as the littoral states of Vietnam, the Philippines, Brunei and Malaysia also claim all or parts of the sea.
In a statement, the US 7th fleet said the USS Curtis Wilbur, an Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer, sailed through the South China Sea “in the vicinity” of the Paracel Islands on May 20 in an operation to uphold the rights, freedoms, and lawful uses of the sea recognised under international law.
“Unlawful and sweeping maritime claims in the South China Sea pose a serious threat to the freedom of the seas, including the freedoms of navigation and overflight, free trade and unimpeded commerce and freedom of economic opportunity for South China Sea littoral nations,” the statement said.


The crew of the USS Curtis Wilbur stand watch on the bridge as its crosses waters in the South China Sea in the vicinity of the Spratly Islands [Courtesy of US Navy 7th Fleet]The South China Sea has emerged as a chief flashpoint in deteriorating relations between the US and China, with Washington rejecting Beijing’s claims in the strategic waterway where it has stepped up the construction of artificial islands and expanded rocky islets to establish military bases.

China, Taiwan, and Vietnam all claim sovereignty over the Paracel Islands, known as Xisha in China and Hoang Sa in Vietnam. The island chain lies about 400 kilometres (250 miles) east of Vietnam and 350 kilometres (220 miles) south of China.

The US Navy said all three require either permission or advance notification before a military vessel or warship engages in “innocent passage” through the territorial sea. Under the 1982 Law of the Sea Convention, the ships of all countries – including their warships – enjoy the right of innocent passage through the territorial sea, it added, saying that it had not sought prior notification or permission from any of the claimants.

The US has increased so-called “freedom of navigation” operations in recent years, not only in the South China Sea but also in the Taiwan Strait where the USS Curtis Wilbur sailed on Tuesday. China said that operation put “peace and stability” at risk.

“The United States upholds freedom of navigation as a principle,” the US Navy statement said, stressing that its operations were carried out in accordance with international law. It previously sent a warship – the USS John S McCain – close to the Paracels in February.

“As long as some countries continue to assert maritime claims that are inconsistent with international law as reflected in the 1982 Law of the Sea Convention and that purport to restrict unlawfully the rights and freedoms guaranteed to all States, the United States will continue to defend those rights and freedoms.”

 

Tai Hai Chen

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China furious after US warship sails close to disputed Paracels
Beijing accuses US of entering its waters around islands also claimed by Vietnam and Taiwan without permission.


The USS Curtis Wilbur during 'freedom of navigation' operations in the South China Sea on May 20 [Courtesy of US Navy 7th Fleet]
20 May 2021

China has reacted with fury after the United States Navy sent a warship through waters in the disputed South China Sea near the Paracel Islands in a mission it said was to “assert” navigational rights and freedoms, but China said was illegal.
The Chinese military’s Southern Theatre Command said on Thursday the USS Curtis Wilbur had entered the waters without permission, and that its ships and planes followed the US vessel.
Keep reading
China says US threatens peace as warship crosses Taiwan StraitDuterte bans Philippines cabinet from speaking on South China SeaSpace: The new frontier for US-China rivalryUS, China need to dial back ‘unhelpful rhetoric’: Industry body
Spokesperson Tian Junli said the PLA had “expelled” the USS Curtis Wilbur, describing the US as a “true troublemaker”, state broadcaster CGTN reported.
China claims almost the entire South China Sea under its so-called nine-dash line that has been dismissed as without basis by the international tribunal at The Hague. Taiwan, as well as the littoral states of Vietnam, the Philippines, Brunei and Malaysia also claim all or parts of the sea.
In a statement, the US 7th fleet said the USS Curtis Wilbur, an Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer, sailed through the South China Sea “in the vicinity” of the Paracel Islands on May 20 in an operation to uphold the rights, freedoms, and lawful uses of the sea recognised under international law.
“Unlawful and sweeping maritime claims in the South China Sea pose a serious threat to the freedom of the seas, including the freedoms of navigation and overflight, free trade and unimpeded commerce and freedom of economic opportunity for South China Sea littoral nations,” the statement said.


The crew of the USS Curtis Wilbur stand watch on the bridge as its crosses waters in the South China Sea in the vicinity of the Spratly Islands [Courtesy of US Navy 7th Fleet]The South China Sea has emerged as a chief flashpoint in deteriorating relations between the US and China, with Washington rejecting Beijing’s claims in the strategic waterway where it has stepped up the construction of artificial islands and expanded rocky islets to establish military bases.

China, Taiwan, and Vietnam all claim sovereignty over the Paracel Islands, known as Xisha in China and Hoang Sa in Vietnam. The island chain lies about 400 kilometres (250 miles) east of Vietnam and 350 kilometres (220 miles) south of China.

The US Navy said all three require either permission or advance notification before a military vessel or warship engages in “innocent passage” through the territorial sea. Under the 1982 Law of the Sea Convention, the ships of all countries – including their warships – enjoy the right of innocent passage through the territorial sea, it added, saying that it had not sought prior notification or permission from any of the claimants.

The US has increased so-called “freedom of navigation” operations in recent years, not only in the South China Sea but also in the Taiwan Strait where the USS Curtis Wilbur sailed on Tuesday. China said that operation put “peace and stability” at risk.

“The United States upholds freedom of navigation as a principle,” the US Navy statement said, stressing that its operations were carried out in accordance with international law. It previously sent a warship – the USS John S McCain – close to the Paracels in February.

“As long as some countries continue to assert maritime claims that are inconsistent with international law as reflected in the 1982 Law of the Sea Convention and that purport to restrict unlawfully the rights and freedoms guaranteed to all States, the United States will continue to defend those rights and freedoms.”

China furious after US warship sails close to disputed Paracels
Beijing accuses US of entering its waters around islands also claimed by Vietnam and Taiwan without permission.


The USS Curtis Wilbur during 'freedom of navigation' operations in the South China Sea on May 20 [Courtesy of US Navy 7th Fleet]
20 May 2021

China has reacted with fury after the United States Navy sent a warship through waters in the disputed South China Sea near the Paracel Islands in a mission it said was to “assert” navigational rights and freedoms, but China said was illegal.
The Chinese military’s Southern Theatre Command said on Thursday the USS Curtis Wilbur had entered the waters without permission, and that its ships and planes followed the US vessel.
Keep reading
China says US threatens peace as warship crosses Taiwan StraitDuterte bans Philippines cabinet from speaking on South China SeaSpace: The new frontier for US-China rivalryUS, China need to dial back ‘unhelpful rhetoric’: Industry body
Spokesperson Tian Junli said the PLA had “expelled” the USS Curtis Wilbur, describing the US as a “true troublemaker”, state broadcaster CGTN reported.
China claims almost the entire South China Sea under its so-called nine-dash line that has been dismissed as without basis by the international tribunal at The Hague. Taiwan, as well as the littoral states of Vietnam, the Philippines, Brunei and Malaysia also claim all or parts of the sea.
In a statement, the US 7th fleet said the USS Curtis Wilbur, an Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer, sailed through the South China Sea “in the vicinity” of the Paracel Islands on May 20 in an operation to uphold the rights, freedoms, and lawful uses of the sea recognised under international law.
“Unlawful and sweeping maritime claims in the South China Sea pose a serious threat to the freedom of the seas, including the freedoms of navigation and overflight, free trade and unimpeded commerce and freedom of economic opportunity for South China Sea littoral nations,” the statement said.


The crew of the USS Curtis Wilbur stand watch on the bridge as its crosses waters in the South China Sea in the vicinity of the Spratly Islands [Courtesy of US Navy 7th Fleet]The South China Sea has emerged as a chief flashpoint in deteriorating relations between the US and China, with Washington rejecting Beijing’s claims in the strategic waterway where it has stepped up the construction of artificial islands and expanded rocky islets to establish military bases.

China, Taiwan, and Vietnam all claim sovereignty over the Paracel Islands, known as Xisha in China and Hoang Sa in Vietnam. The island chain lies about 400 kilometres (250 miles) east of Vietnam and 350 kilometres (220 miles) south of China.

The US Navy said all three require either permission or advance notification before a military vessel or warship engages in “innocent passage” through the territorial sea. Under the 1982 Law of the Sea Convention, the ships of all countries – including their warships – enjoy the right of innocent passage through the territorial sea, it added, saying that it had not sought prior notification or permission from any of the claimants.

The US has increased so-called “freedom of navigation” operations in recent years, not only in the South China Sea but also in the Taiwan Strait where the USS Curtis Wilbur sailed on Tuesday. China said that operation put “peace and stability” at risk.

“The United States upholds freedom of navigation as a principle,” the US Navy statement said, stressing that its operations were carried out in accordance with international law. It previously sent a warship – the USS John S McCain – close to the Paracels in February.

“As long as some countries continue to assert maritime claims that are inconsistent with international law as reflected in the 1982 Law of the Sea Convention and that purport to restrict unlawfully the rights and freedoms guaranteed to all States, the United States will continue to defend those rights and freedoms.”

Considering China signed and ratified UNCLOS, if they sail within territorial water of Chinese island which I think is about 22 km then it gives China carte blanche to sink the US warship with an anti ship ballistic missile. Sure, a few hundreds American service men and women aboard the US warship will die but it would certainly send the Americans a message not to sail too close to a Chinese island in South China Sea.
 

KAL-EL

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If they sail within territorial water of Chinese island which I think is about 22 km then it gives China carte blanche to sink the US warship with an anti ship ballistic missile. Sure, a few hundreds American service men and women aboard the US warship will die but it would certainly send the Americans a message not to sail to close to a Chinese island in South China Sea.
Nothing will happen, as usual.

I constantly see threats on PDF, but in the real world, that’s not how it works Austin powers.
 

Tai Hai Chen

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Nothing will happen, as usual.

I constantly see threats on PDF, but in the real world, that’s not how it works Austin powers.
They can sail outside Chinese territorial water but if they enter Chinese territorial water around island in South China Sea then China can legally sink it with anti ship ballistic missile because China signed and ratified UNCLOS whereas the US has not. Hundreds of dead American service men and women aboard the US warship would send the US public furious at Sleepy Joe and I guess he would lose his office and political career.
 

Beast

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Nothing will happen, as usual.

I constantly see threats on PDF, but in the real world, that’s not how it works Austin powers.
How many Chinese warship US has sunk? Same as the empty american threat! Remember US claim they will remove Chinese weapon from those man made islet in SCS. How many has removed so far? Zero....
 

KAL-EL

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How many Chinese warship US has sunk? Same as the empty american threat! Remember US claim they will remove Chinese weapon from those man made islet in SCS. How many has removed so far? Zero....
I mainly referring to some on PDF making the threats. they have absolutely no power or inkling of how it works in the real world.

Do you see me constantly threatening that USA will sink Chinese ships?
 
Last edited:

Tai Hai Chen

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I mainly referring to some on PDF making the threats. they have absolutely no power or inkling of how it works in the real world.

Do you see me constantly threatening that USA will sink Chinese ships?
Turkey shot down Russian Su-24 after it went into Turkish airspace by accident. China can legally sink US warship if it goes into Chinese territorial water around that Chinese teeny tiny island in South China Sea and nothing the US can do about it because China signed and ratified UNCLOS.
 

Reashot Xigwin

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Turkey shot down Russian Su-24 after it went into Turkish airspace by accident. China can legally sink US warship if it goes into Chinese territorial water around that Chinese teeny tiny island in South China Sea and nothing the US can do about it because China signed and ratified UNCLOS.
US isn't a s-hole country like Russia that can be pushed around by the likes of turkey & we're talking about ships here way bigger price tags & people inside. Expect retaliation when China do.

FYI UNCLOS only count islands not sandbar
 

Tai Hai Chen

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US isn't a s-hole country like Russia that can be pushed around by the likes of turkey & we're talking about ships here way bigger price tags & people inside. Expect retaliation when China do.

FYI UNCLOS only count islands not sandbar
Artificial islands also count.
 

huckyang

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China furious after US warship sails close to disputed Paracels
Beijing accuses US of entering its waters around islands also claimed by Vietnam and Taiwan without permission.


The USS Curtis Wilbur during 'freedom of navigation' operations in the South China Sea on May 20 [Courtesy of US Navy 7th Fleet]
20 May 2021

China has reacted with fury after the United States Navy sent a warship through waters in the disputed South China Sea near the Paracel Islands in a mission it said was to “assert” navigational rights and freedoms, but China said was illegal.
The Chinese military’s Southern Theatre Command said on Thursday the USS Curtis Wilbur had entered the waters without permission, and that its ships and planes followed the US vessel.
Keep reading
China says US threatens peace as warship crosses Taiwan StraitDuterte bans Philippines cabinet from speaking on South China SeaSpace: The new frontier for US-China rivalryUS, China need to dial back ‘unhelpful rhetoric’: Industry body
Spokesperson Tian Junli said the PLA had “expelled” the USS Curtis Wilbur, describing the US as a “true troublemaker”, state broadcaster CGTN reported.
China claims almost the entire South China Sea under its so-called nine-dash line that has been dismissed as without basis by the international tribunal at The Hague. Taiwan, as well as the littoral states of Vietnam, the Philippines, Brunei and Malaysia also claim all or parts of the sea.
In a statement, the US 7th fleet said the USS Curtis Wilbur, an Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer, sailed through the South China Sea “in the vicinity” of the Paracel Islands on May 20 in an operation to uphold the rights, freedoms, and lawful uses of the sea recognised under international law.
“Unlawful and sweeping maritime claims in the South China Sea pose a serious threat to the freedom of the seas, including the freedoms of navigation and overflight, free trade and unimpeded commerce and freedom of economic opportunity for South China Sea littoral nations,” the statement said.


The crew of the USS Curtis Wilbur stand watch on the bridge as its crosses waters in the South China Sea in the vicinity of the Spratly Islands [Courtesy of US Navy 7th Fleet]The South China Sea has emerged as a chief flashpoint in deteriorating relations between the US and China, with Washington rejecting Beijing’s claims in the strategic waterway where it has stepped up the construction of artificial islands and expanded rocky islets to establish military bases.

China, Taiwan, and Vietnam all claim sovereignty over the Paracel Islands, known as Xisha in China and Hoang Sa in Vietnam. The island chain lies about 400 kilometres (250 miles) east of Vietnam and 350 kilometres (220 miles) south of China.

The US Navy said all three require either permission or advance notification before a military vessel or warship engages in “innocent passage” through the territorial sea. Under the 1982 Law of the Sea Convention, the ships of all countries – including their warships – enjoy the right of innocent passage through the territorial sea, it added, saying that it had not sought prior notification or permission from any of the claimants.

The US has increased so-called “freedom of navigation” operations in recent years, not only in the South China Sea but also in the Taiwan Strait where the USS Curtis Wilbur sailed on Tuesday. China said that operation put “peace and stability” at risk.

“The United States upholds freedom of navigation as a principle,” the US Navy statement said, stressing that its operations were carried out in accordance with international law. It previously sent a warship – the USS John S McCain – close to the Paracels in February.

“As long as some countries continue to assert maritime claims that are inconsistent with international law as reflected in the 1982 Law of the Sea Convention and that purport to restrict unlawfully the rights and freedoms guaranteed to all States, the United States will continue to defend those rights and freedoms.”

China furious after US warship sails close to disputed Paracels
Beijing accuses US of entering its waters around islands also claimed by Vietnam and Taiwan without permission.


The USS Curtis Wilbur during 'freedom of navigation' operations in the South China Sea on May 20 [Courtesy of US Navy 7th Fleet]
20 May 2021

China has reacted with fury after the United States Navy sent a warship through waters in the disputed South China Sea near the Paracel Islands in a mission it said was to “assert” navigational rights and freedoms, but China said was illegal.
The Chinese military’s Southern Theatre Command said on Thursday the USS Curtis Wilbur had entered the waters without permission, and that its ships and planes followed the US vessel.
Keep reading
China says US threatens peace as warship crosses Taiwan StraitDuterte bans Philippines cabinet from speaking on South China SeaSpace: The new frontier for US-China rivalryUS, China need to dial back ‘unhelpful rhetoric’: Industry body
Spokesperson Tian Junli said the PLA had “expelled” the USS Curtis Wilbur, describing the US as a “true troublemaker”, state broadcaster CGTN reported.
China claims almost the entire South China Sea under its so-called nine-dash line that has been dismissed as without basis by the international tribunal at The Hague. Taiwan, as well as the littoral states of Vietnam, the Philippines, Brunei and Malaysia also claim all or parts of the sea.
In a statement, the US 7th fleet said the USS Curtis Wilbur, an Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer, sailed through the South China Sea “in the vicinity” of the Paracel Islands on May 20 in an operation to uphold the rights, freedoms, and lawful uses of the sea recognised under international law.
“Unlawful and sweeping maritime claims in the South China Sea pose a serious threat to the freedom of the seas, including the freedoms of navigation and overflight, free trade and unimpeded commerce and freedom of economic opportunity for South China Sea littoral nations,” the statement said.


The crew of the USS Curtis Wilbur stand watch on the bridge as its crosses waters in the South China Sea in the vicinity of the Spratly Islands [Courtesy of US Navy 7th Fleet]The South China Sea has emerged as a chief flashpoint in deteriorating relations between the US and China, with Washington rejecting Beijing’s claims in the strategic waterway where it has stepped up the construction of artificial islands and expanded rocky islets to establish military bases.

China, Taiwan, and Vietnam all claim sovereignty over the Paracel Islands, known as Xisha in China and Hoang Sa in Vietnam. The island chain lies about 400 kilometres (250 miles) east of Vietnam and 350 kilometres (220 miles) south of China.

The US Navy said all three require either permission or advance notification before a military vessel or warship engages in “innocent passage” through the territorial sea. Under the 1982 Law of the Sea Convention, the ships of all countries – including their warships – enjoy the right of innocent passage through the territorial sea, it added, saying that it had not sought prior notification or permission from any of the claimants.

The US has increased so-called “freedom of navigation” operations in recent years, not only in the South China Sea but also in the Taiwan Strait where the USS Curtis Wilbur sailed on Tuesday. China said that operation put “peace and stability” at risk.

“The United States upholds freedom of navigation as a principle,” the US Navy statement said, stressing that its operations were carried out in accordance with international law. It previously sent a warship – the USS John S McCain – close to the Paracels in February.

“As long as some countries continue to assert maritime claims that are inconsistent with international law as reflected in the 1982 Law of the Sea Convention and that purport to restrict unlawfully the rights and freedoms guaranteed to all States, the United States will continue to defend those rights and freedoms.”

China is just pretending to be furious, the more US navy comes the better. Why?
 

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