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Chill Bangladesh Thread

Valar.

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The first one. My former business partner seemed to have it. He said drinking milky tea gives him regurgitations.



Ha ha. That reminds me of two Chinese members on the dedicated tea thread on PDF. One female and one male. Both said that the Chinese consider milky tea to be milk, not tea. :lol:

But I have heard Pakistani members here speak of Doodh Patti Chai but couldn't understand what it is. How is it different from regular milky tea ?
DoodhPati as the name implies is the tea+milk.

In our case, it just means making tea with just milk,100% milk, no water.

For some others i think, its 50-75% milk and the rest water.

Normal Chai for us is 25% milk, 75% water.
 

Bilal9

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Well then you should be alright.

I thought it's something to do with dairy items that caused it. I don't know exactly what's it called either lactose intolerance or lactase intolerance. Some people( and some nationalities/cultures) have it in which they cannot consume a lot of milk/dairy. Reminds me of my first ever encounter with a far east asian guy who drank DoodhPati Chai with me and another Indian friend from Delhi, loved it, and half an hour later started having trouble in stomach. Apparently, the dude could consume milk in small quantity but 'can't consume 'a lot' of milk because their cultural usage/consumption of milk is much lesser than the others.
The farther East you go the less tolerance of lactose. In Bangladesh we have part East Asian ancestry, so it's 50/50 Lactose intolerance level. I am sure in Myanmar and Thailand it's even less. They hardly have milk products in their usual diet except maybe for babies. But I could be wrong.

People (usually from Pakistan and Northern India) who used to rear grazing animals for a living and used to consume milk from them, have Lactose tolerance built into their genes.
 
Oct 27, 2014
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Baked Bonanza’s Shahi Tukra – The Aroma Of Saffron Took My Breath Away
By
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Baked Bonanza Shahi TukraImage credit: Rabika Sneha (@adorefood)

Bangladeshi sweets

Bengali desserts you should try to taste the real flavor of Bengal:

1. Sandesh
Sandesh is one of the most desired Bengali sweets and every Bengali loves mishti (mithai/Sweet) and Sandesh because it can be quickly made and served.

Bengali Sweets - Sandesh
Image Source
Sandesh is made with milk so you can’t store it for long and it has to be eaten as soon as possible. Topping is what gives it its real taste. It is usually topped with soaked almonds, saffron, pistachios, and nuts.

2. Cham Cham
Cham Cham is prepared with cheese and they add rose water and double cream to this dessert.

Bengali Sweets - Cham Cham
Image Source
They serve it with fresh cream filled in an icing bag and then garnish ground nuts on top.

3. Chena Murki
Chena Murki does not contain sugar in the batter but it also has a coating of sugar. It comes in small cubes and is prepared with cottage cheese, rose water, and cardamom powder.

Bengali Sweets - Chena Murki

It is a vegan Indian recipe and pieces of cheese are immersed in sugar syrup to get them coated.

4. Mishti Doi
This dessert not only tastes amazing but it is also very simple to make. You only have to take 3 ingredients: whole milk, sugar, and yogurt.

Bengali Sweets - Mishti Doi
Image Source
The only condition is to set it aside in a dark spot for the best results. When it takes its shape, chill it and serve after the meal.

5. Bengali Rasgulla
Rasgullas are great to eat and there are not many Indians who have never eaten Rasgullas in their life. It is very delightful when you take your first bite although there are people who prefer eating the whole Rasgulla in a single bite.

Bengali Sweets - Bengali Rasgulla
Image Source
Rasgullas are an essential part of any sweets sold in sweets shops in India.

6. Kheer
Kheer is known as rice pudding outside India. It takes too much to prepare kheer because you have to cook a mixture of rice and milk on a low flame until they are well combined.

Bengali Sweets - Kheer
Image Source
The perfect kheer dish is light pink in color and tastes like skim milk. It is also garnished with ground almonds and pistachios.

7. Pantuva
Pantuva is a traditional Bengali dessert and it is quite easy to prepare it. All you need is semolina flour, chenna, sugar, and khoya to cook Pantuva.

Bengali Sweets - Pantuva
Image Source
It is made in form of small balls and these balls are stuffed with khoya and nuts.

8. Nolen Gurer Payesh
Payash is another word used for kheer in Bengal and its surroundings. Nolun Gurer Kheer is prepared with milk, rice and Jaggery and preparation takes only 30 minutes.

Bengali Sweets - Nolen Gurer Payesh
Ate sandesh, kacha chana, kheer, cham cham, mishti doi and rasgulla
Except the doi everything was amazing
 

Bilal9

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Take a gander at this. E-commerce fraudster (e-Orange) arrested in India while fleeing Bangladesh.

 

PoondolotoPandalum

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Out of interest

What do you guys like more

a) Dhaka Kachi biriyani with borhani

b) Your usual Pakistani Biriyani with Pakistani lassi (our's are a bit different i guess)

I prefer Central Asian pilaf myself (similar to Kabuli pilau, though Uzbeks do it best), more decadent and luxurious. But out of the two, I'd pick Kachi. More sophisticated, and much harder to prepare (so I'm told)
 

DalalErMaNodi

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Out of interest

What do you guys like more

a) Dhaka Kachi biriyani with borhani

b) Your usual Pakistani Biriyani with Pakistani lassi (our's are a bit different i guess)

I prefer Central Asian pilaf myself (similar to Kabuli pilau, though Uzbeks do it best), more decadent and luxurious. But out of the two, I'd pick Kachi. More sophisticated, and much harder to prepare (so I'm told)


Chatgaiya Mezbani meat with Kala bhoona on the side.

Nothing else comes close.



I'd go with Pakistani Biryani from the ones you listed anyday.
 

Cryptic_distortion

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Out of interest

What do you guys like more

a) Dhaka Kachi biriyani with borhani

b) Your usual Pakistani Biriyani with Pakistani lassi (our's are a bit different i guess)

I prefer Central Asian pilaf myself (similar to Kabuli pilau, though Uzbeks do it best), more decadent and luxurious. But out of the two, I'd pick Kachi. More sophisticated, and much harder to prepare (so I'm told)
Kachi Biryani any day - North Indian/Pakistani Biryani not even close
 

Bilal9

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Feb 4, 2014
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Out of interest

What do you guys like more

a) Dhaka Kachi biriyani with borhani

b) Your usual Pakistani Biriyani with Pakistani lassi (our's are a bit different i guess)

I prefer Central Asian pilaf myself (similar to Kabuli pilau, though Uzbeks do it best), more decadent and luxurious. But out of the two, I'd pick Kachi. More sophisticated, and much harder to prepare (so I'm told)
Kacchi brother, no question (juicy mutton so soft it falls off the bones) and of course our own borhani as served in weddings, with Intense spicy kick. Great on winter evenings, when Shaadis usually happen anyways...
 

leonblack08

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Out of interest

What do you guys like more

a) Dhaka Kachi biriyani with borhani

b) Your usual Pakistani Biriyani with Pakistani lassi (our's are a bit different i guess)

I prefer Central Asian pilaf myself (similar to Kabuli pilau, though Uzbeks do it best), more decadent and luxurious. But out of the two, I'd pick Kachi. More sophisticated, and much harder to prepare (so I'm told)
Kachchi Biriyani. Nothing comes remotely close.
 

Bilal9

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I saw this and had to post it. Uni Germany giai khanto hon nai - akhon oi deshe Jjalamoi boktrita prodan shuru korechhen. Green markai vote den! Problem is - in Germany he could get all of ten supporters to root for his press conference. Ja hok egiye jan Bangali Bhai...

 
Oct 27, 2014
10,315
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Bangladesh
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Ukraine
Out of interest

What do you guys like more

a) Dhaka Kachi biriyani with borhani

b) Your usual Pakistani Biriyani with Pakistani lassi (our's are a bit different i guess)

I prefer Central Asian pilaf myself (similar to Kabuli pilau, though Uzbeks do it best), more decadent and luxurious. But out of the two, I'd pick Kachi. More sophisticated, and much harder to prepare (so I'm told)
Pakistani lassi? What’s different? Sour or sweet?
I prefer pilau myself too. Although Bengali variant because chinigura rice makes a mean pulav and it goes well with everything
Kacchi brother, no question (juicy mutton so soft it falls off the bones) and of course our own borhani as served in weddings, with Intense spicy kick. Great on winter evenings, when Shaadis usually happen anyways...
You’re bringing back so many memories 😄
Unfortunately I’ll have to settle for my own wedding to enjoy that again. Maybe next year inshallah 😂
 
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