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Galactic Penguin SST

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Myanmar protesters pressure Singapore to ‘stand for justice’ and compel Min Aung Hlaing to cede power

• The island nation is the top source of foreign direct investment in Myanmar, and is allegedly friendly with the generals who seized power from an elected government
• These ties have been put in the spotlight by demonstrations against Singaporean businesses in Myanmar such as Ya Kun Kaya Toast and Crystal Jade Kitchen

Published: 9:20pm, 18 Feb, 2021

Singapore’s foreign minister Vivian Balakrishnan on Thursday told the military leaders behind Myanmar’s coup that the use of live rounds against unarmed civilians protesting the seizure of power was unacceptable “under any circumstances”.

Diplomatic observers said the language in a foreign ministry press statement, released after Balakrishnan’s meeting with his Indonesian counterpart Retno Marsudi, signified a toughened stance from the city state as it came under pressure from protesters over its purported cosy relationship with the generals who had seized power from a democratically elected government.

In recent days, Singapore has been put in the spotlight by protesters from Myanmar who are demanding that the island republic use its economic clout to compel the coup’s architect, army chief Min Aung Hlaing, to end the crackdown on protesters, swiftly restore democratic rule, and release detainees.

Singapore is the top source of foreign direct investment in Myanmar.

Social media posts on Thursday showed protesters gathered outside Singapore’s embassy in Yangon, chanting “please be a good neighbour” and “stand for justice”.

Similar demonstrations had taken place outside the embassy over the weekend.

Online, some Myanmar citizens urged compatriots to boycott Singaporean businesses such as restaurant chains Ya Kun Kaya Toast and Crystal Jade Kitchen over the republic’s allegedly friendly ties with the generals.

“Singapore is not very supportive [of the anti-coup protests] … that means they are spitting on their customers [the Myanmar people],” one social media post read. “As long as it doesn’t harm its own interests, I don’t think a ‘broker’ like Singapore would care about us.”

Not all protesters bore such sentiment, however. A Myanmar-based film director in his 30s told This Week in Asia he would refrain from answering the boycott calls as it would hurt the livelihoods of those working in the targeted businesses.

Some of the anti-Singapore sentiment online referenced foreign minister Balakrishnan’s remarks to the island nation’s parliament on Tuesday, when he said the country was against “widespread, generalised, indiscriminate sanctions” on Myanmar as these would hurt ordinary citizens there the most.

An analyst said the minister’s remarks might have been misinterpreted by protesters as meaning Singapore was against all forms of sanctions – including targeted censures of the generals – when that was not the case.

BOYCOTT: The famous Singapore brands Yakun Kaya Toast and Tiger beer are now largely under boycott in Myanmar.


https://archive.is/uaMpC/fa3d834755a6c71d5d04ea3821fb11a12f7f333c.jpg ; https://archive.is/uaMpC/5be1052ea0a2c2d6a51c165ed28e56da47eeea8b/scr.png ; http://web.archive.org/web/20210218214218/https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EuZ6hR0XYAEn4kz?format=jpg&name=900x900 ; http://web.archive.org/web/20210218214254/https://twitter.com/mrattkthu/status/1361910667020816384 ; https://archive.vn/bsT4h
1. BOYCOTT: The famous Singapore brands Yakun Kaya Toast and Tiger beer are now largely under boycott in Myanmar.

‘THE ASEAN CONSENSUS HURDLE’

In its statement, Singapore’s foreign ministry said both Balakrishnan and Indonesian foreign minister Marsudi hoped for dialogue and for Myanmar to return “to its path of democratic transition”.

“Minister Balakrishnan urged all parties involved to exercise utmost restraint and take urgent steps to de-escalate the situation,” it said. “He stressed that there should be no violence against unarmed civilians. In particular, live rounds should not be fired on unarmed civilians under any circumstances.”

The statement added that Balakrishnan and Marsudi – who is on a whistle-stop regional tour to gather backing within the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (Asean) for talks over the crisis – expressed “strong support” for an informal meeting of foreign ministers from the association’s member states to be convened as soon as possible.

Dylan Loh, a foreign policy scholar at Singapore’s Nanyang Technological University, said the reference to live bullets by the country’s foreign ministry was “certainly stronger than previous statements”, even though it did not go as far as responses from Western governments.

He said it was noteworthy that the statement was released in the context of Balakrishnan’s bilateral meeting with Marsudi, as the tough language might not have “cleared the Asean consensus hurdle”. The statement was a “smart way to exert some pressure on the junta without violating Asean principles, while allowing differing views to ventilate”, Loh said.

The 10-nation association operates on strict principles of non-interference in domestic affairs and mutual respect for national sovereignty, with statements of censure usually requiring unanimous assent from all member states.

Speaking to This Week in Asia before Singapore’s Thursday statement, Myanmar watcher Hunter Marston said it was important to note that Balakrishnan’s remarks earlier in the week were about widespread sanctions rather than all sanctions in general.

“That’s something most sanctions proponents agree on,” Marston, an Australia-based Southeast Asia scholar, said by email.

All the same, Myanmar social media users’ visceral anger towards Singapore has rekindled discussions in the regional commentariat over whether the wealthy city state – as well as other major investor nations – had adequately distanced themselves from dealings with Myanmar’s military prior to the coup.

Singapore is no stranger to such questions. In 2007, in the aftermath of a bloody crackdown by the then-ruling junta, it came under similar pressure for its purportedly close relationship with strongman leader Than Shwe and his lieutenants.

Now, as it was then, one of the biggest topics of discussion is the sheer scale of investment from Singapore into Myanmar – in particular into entities deemed to be connected to the Tatmadaw, as the military is known locally.

Singapore’s rejoinder at the time was that the Asean bloc as a whole needed to maintain its economic leverage on the then-isolated country. “If we in Asean boycott Myanmar, we would lose our moral influence, which is not insignificant,” the island nation’s then foreign minister George Yeo said.

SEVERAL OPTIONS AVAILABLE

As of December last year, the cumulative amount of approved investment from Singaporean sources to Myanmar stood at US$24.1 billion.

In his remarks to lawmakers on Tuesday, Balakrishnan said a “major proportion” of these investments had actually occurred in the past five years, after now-deposed civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi and her National League for Democracy (NLD) won a landslide election in 2015 against the military’s civilian proxies.

Senior General Min Aung Hlaing’s February 1 seizure of power – and detention of Suu Kyi as well as her key allies – came after the military complained of vote rigging following another decisive election victory by the NLD in November.

Asked by an opposition lawmaker whether the government would provide necessary “assistance and advice” to Singaporean companies operating in Myanmar that could be caught up in Western sanctions against entities linked to the military, Balakrishnan said the administration’s position was that businesses should make “commercial decisions and investment decisions on their own merits”, adding that the republic had long sought to maintain a separation between politics and business.

Chong Ja Ian, associate professor in the political science department at the National University of Singapore, suggested that maintaining such a position would be difficult, especially in a country such as Myanmar where the Tatmadaw was “deeply involved in both politics and business”.

He said there were several options available to Singapore to exert more pressure on Myanmar, including the possibility of the republic publicising “financial and business-dealing activities of the Tatmadaw in Singapore” as it had done to the United Nations for a 2018 report on North Korea.

It could also suspend or slow dealings with junta-linked entities, and “suspend or cease the sale of military and law enforcement equipment and services to Myanmar”, Chong said, referencing a 2019 announcement by the Singaporean state-linked firm ST Engineering that it was collaborating with Myanmar to provide cybersecurity services and training.

“[But] the question, however, is not what Singapore can do, but what it is willing to do,” Chong said. “If Singapore expects the Tatmadaw to continue to be a key actor in Myanmar’s politics, it may have a strong incentive to keep a working relationship.”

He added: “So long as the costs of the protests [against Singapore] do not outweigh the benefits of those relationships with Myanmar, there may be less expectation of action from Singapore.”

There have also been suggestions that Singaporean companies could find themselves targeted if there were further sanctions imposed by the United States. President Joe Biden’s administration has already slapped fresh sanctions on Min Aung Hlaing and other top military figures, in addition to the targeted censures put on them by Washington in 2019 over their alleged role in the killing of Rohingya Muslims.

Marston, a doctoral candidate at the Australian National University, said: “Whether or not the US goes after Singaporean businesses with ties to the Myanmar military depends on how the Biden administration intends to enforce existing sanctions and whether Washington expands targeted sanctions to include more military businesses.”

https://www.scmp.com/week-asia/politics/article/3122254/myanmar-protesters-pressure-singapore-stand-justice-and-compel






:cool:🚬
 

Galactic Penguin SST

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Very difficult to cover the topic without biases.

Many events lately, but unable to find neutral or simply alternate sources, other than the obligatory U.S-E.U. dominated ones...

Here, interesting but untested:

It shows the direct connection with the C.I.A., but as in Hong Kong, this doesn't necessarily mean that all the protestors are actually willingly working as agents for the U.S.

An insight into the C.I.A. "Milk Tea Alliance".

Good to expose them.

Disclaimer: Warning, the manual discuss about killing/poisoning governmental forces/supporters!

6:33 PM · Feb 25, 2021·

A project called "hk19 manual" now available in Burmese.

Tips from Hong Kong protests on how to build a leaderless & leaderful protest movement.

Outlines 60 different roles from frontliner to keyboard warrior.

The HK19 Manual (၂၀၁၉ ဟောင်ကောင်လှုပ်ရှားမှု လက်စွဲ) -Part1: the Roles


The HK19 Manual - Part 2B: How Tos
https://twitter.com/YourAnonCentral/status/1364991976693592064

The live map situation of the protest covering:
• Yangoon
• Mandalay
• Kathar
• Monywa
• Pyay
• Bago
• Tha Htone
• MawlaMyine
• Naypi Taw
• Dawei

Myanmar Map Live


https://www.isupportmyanmar.com/team

The same site also contains several downloadable PDF guides on "protest safety".





:cool:🚬
 

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Galactic Penguin SST

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Man that was quick!

The face of the protests in Myanmar has drastically changed. In a couple of days, it looks like just another Hong Kong protest!

Seems that they didn't waste time in learning from the C.I.A. online manual posted previously.

Now for the first time after a month of turmoil, the appearance of the Hong Kong protest gear made of:
• yellow construction helmet
• googles
• umbrella
• backpack
• heat resistant gloves
• broad face cover
• protective shield
• etc


https://archive.vn/cF8Vr/d4fc19b7bc0e07a3eb4af3378954c8d29a435ffb.jpg ; https://archive.vn/cF8Vr/80c51736694323124053e9707be4566d4cf1a636/scr.png ; http://web.archive.org/web/20210228052401/https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EvShWlfXMAAXSNV?format=jpg&name=medium ; http://web.archive.org/web/20210228052334/https://twitter.com/Myanmar_Now_Eng/status/1365894212202483715 ; https://archive.is/UEaFi
1. Hledan in Yangon on Sunday 27 Feb 2021

Expect the introduction of catapults, laser dazzlers, corrosive chemical projectiles, petrol bombs, IEDs, in the coming days!

Here another real time map:





 

Song Hong

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Singapore CNA news media is very sympathetic to Daw Aung San, in lock step with all NATO countries -- ad nauseam.

It is very funny that Daw Aung San who was a genocider, human rights abuser, dictator, now become yet one more time, a freedom fighter.

Myanmar protesters pressure Singapore to ‘stand for justice’ and compel Min Aung Hlaing to cede power


• The island nation is the top source of foreign direct investment in Myanmar, and is allegedly friendly with the generals who seized power from an elected government

• These ties have been put in the spotlight by demonstrations against Singaporean businesses in Myanmar such as Ya Kun Kaya Toast and Crystal Jade Kitchen


Published: 9:20pm, 18 Feb, 2021


Singapore’s foreign minister Vivian Balakrishnan on Thursday told the military leaders behind Myanmar’s coup that the use of live rounds against unarmed civilians protesting the seizure of power was unacceptable “under any circumstances”.


Diplomatic observers said the language in a foreign ministry press statement, released after Balakrishnan’s meeting with his Indonesian counterpart Retno Marsudi, signified a toughened stance from the city state as it came under pressure from protesters over its purported cosy relationship with the generals who had seized power from a democratically elected government.


In recent days, Singapore has been put in the spotlight by protesters from Myanmar who are demanding that the island republic use its economic clout to compel the coup’s architect, army chief Min Aung Hlaing, to end the crackdown on protesters, swiftly restore democratic rule, and release detainees.


Singapore is the top source of foreign direct investment in Myanmar.


Social media posts on Thursday showed protesters gathered outside Singapore’s embassy in Yangon, chanting “please be a good neighbour” and “stand for justice”.


Similar demonstrations had taken place outside the embassy over the weekend.


Online, some Myanmar citizens urged compatriots to boycott Singaporean businesses such as restaurant chains Ya Kun Kaya Toast and Crystal Jade Kitchen over the republic’s allegedly friendly ties with the generals.


“Singapore is not very supportive [of the anti-coup protests] … that means they are spitting on their customers [the Myanmar people],” one social media post read. “As long as it doesn’t harm its own interests, I don’t think a ‘broker’ like Singapore would care about us.”


Not all protesters bore such sentiment, however. A Myanmar-based film director in his 30s told This Week in Asia he would refrain from answering the boycott calls as it would hurt the livelihoods of those working in the targeted businesses.


Some of the anti-Singapore sentiment online referenced foreign minister Balakrishnan’s remarks to the island nation’s parliament on Tuesday, when he said the country was against “widespread, generalised, indiscriminate sanctions” on Myanmar as these would hurt ordinary citizens there the most.


An analyst said the minister’s remarks might have been misinterpreted by protesters as meaning Singapore was against all forms of sanctions – including targeted censures of the generals – when that was not the case.


BOYCOTT: The famous Singapore brands Yakun Kaya Toast and Tiger beer are now largely under boycott in Myanmar.



https://archive.is/uaMpC/fa3d834755a6c71d5d04ea3821fb11a12f7f333c.jpg ; https://archive.is/uaMpC/5be1052ea0a2c2d6a51c165ed28e56da47eeea8b/scr.png ; http://web.archive.org/web/20210218214218/https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EuZ6hR0XYAEn4kz?format=jpg&name=900x900 ; http://web.archive.org/web/20210218214254/https://twitter.com/mrattkthu/status/1361910667020816384 ; https://archive.vn/bsT4h

1. BOYCOTT: The famous Singapore brands Yakun Kaya Toast and Tiger beer are now largely under boycott in Myanmar.


‘THE ASEAN CONSENSUS HURDLE’


In its statement, Singapore’s foreign ministry said both Balakrishnan and Indonesian foreign minister Marsudi hoped for dialogue and for Myanmar to return “to its path of democratic transition”.


“Minister Balakrishnan urged all parties involved to exercise utmost restraint and take urgent steps to de-escalate the situation,” it said. “He stressed that there should be no violence against unarmed civilians. In particular, live rounds should not be fired on unarmed civilians under any circumstances.”


The statement added that Balakrishnan and Marsudi – who is on a whistle-stop regional tour to gather backing within the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (Asean) for talks over the crisis – expressed “strong support” for an informal meeting of foreign ministers from the association’s member states to be convened as soon as possible.


Dylan Loh, a foreign policy scholar at Singapore’s Nanyang Technological University, said the reference to live bullets by the country’s foreign ministry was “certainly stronger than previous statements”, even though it did not go as far as responses from Western governments.


He said it was noteworthy that the statement was released in the context of Balakrishnan’s bilateral meeting with Marsudi, as the tough language might not have “cleared the Asean consensus hurdle”. The statement was a “smart way to exert some pressure on the junta without violating Asean principles, while allowing differing views to ventilate”, Loh said.


The 10-nation association operates on strict principles of non-interference in domestic affairs and mutual respect for national sovereignty, with statements of censure usually requiring unanimous assent from all member states.


Speaking to This Week in Asia before Singapore’s Thursday statement, Myanmar watcher Hunter Marston said it was important to note that Balakrishnan’s remarks earlier in the week were about widespread sanctions rather than all sanctions in general.


“That’s something most sanctions proponents agree on,” Marston, an Australia-based Southeast Asia scholar, said by email.


All the same, Myanmar social media users’ visceral anger towards Singapore has rekindled discussions in the regional commentariat over whether the wealthy city state – as well as other major investor nations – had adequately distanced themselves from dealings with Myanmar’s military prior to the coup.


Singapore is no stranger to such questions. In 2007, in the aftermath of a bloody crackdown by the then-ruling junta, it came under similar pressure for its purportedly close relationship with strongman leader Than Shwe and his lieutenants.


Now, as it was then, one of the biggest topics of discussion is the sheer scale of investment from Singapore into Myanmar – in particular into entities deemed to be connected to the Tatmadaw, as the military is known locally.


Singapore’s rejoinder at the time was that the Asean bloc as a whole needed to maintain its economic leverage on the then-isolated country. “If we in Asean boycott Myanmar, we would lose our moral influence, which is not insignificant,” the island nation’s then foreign minister George Yeo said.


SEVERAL OPTIONS AVAILABLE


As of December last year, the cumulative amount of approved investment from Singaporean sources to Myanmar stood at US$24.1 billion.


In his remarks to lawmakers on Tuesday, Balakrishnan said a “major proportion” of these investments had actually occurred in the past five years, after now-deposed civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi and her National League for Democracy (NLD) won a landslide election in 2015 against the military’s civilian proxies.


Senior General Min Aung Hlaing’s February 1 seizure of power – and detention of Suu Kyi as well as her key allies – came after the military complained of vote rigging following another decisive election victory by the NLD in November.


Asked by an opposition lawmaker whether the government would provide necessary “assistance and advice” to Singaporean companies operating in Myanmar that could be caught up in Western sanctions against entities linked to the military, Balakrishnan said the administration’s position was that businesses should make “commercial decisions and investment decisions on their own merits”, adding that the republic had long sought to maintain a separation between politics and business.


Chong Ja Ian, associate professor in the political science department at the National University of Singapore, suggested that maintaining such a position would be difficult, especially in a country such as Myanmar where the Tatmadaw was “deeply involved in both politics and business”.


He said there were several options available to Singapore to exert more pressure on Myanmar, including the possibility of the republic publicising “financial and business-dealing activities of the Tatmadaw in Singapore” as it had done to the United Nations for a 2018 report on North Korea.


It could also suspend or slow dealings with junta-linked entities, and “suspend or cease the sale of military and law enforcement equipment and services to Myanmar”, Chong said, referencing a 2019 announcement by the Singaporean state-linked firm ST Engineering that it was collaborating with Myanmar to provide cybersecurity services and training.


“[But] the question, however, is not what Singapore can do, but what it is willing to do,” Chong said. “If Singapore expects the Tatmadaw to continue to be a key actor in Myanmar’s politics, it may have a strong incentive to keep a working relationship.”


He added: “So long as the costs of the protests [against Singapore] do not outweigh the benefits of those relationships with Myanmar, there may be less expectation of action from Singapore.”


There have also been suggestions that Singaporean companies could find themselves targeted if there were further sanctions imposed by the United States. President Joe Biden’s administration has already slapped fresh sanctions on Min Aung Hlaing and other top military figures, in addition to the targeted censures put on them by Washington in 2019 over their alleged role in the killing of Rohingya Muslims.


Marston, a doctoral candidate at the Australian National University, said: “Whether or not the US goes after Singaporean businesses with ties to the Myanmar military depends on how the Biden administration intends to enforce existing sanctions and whether Washington expands targeted sanctions to include more military businesses.”


https://www.scmp.com/week-asia/politics/article/3122254/myanmar-protesters-pressure-singapore-stand-justice-and-compel







:cool:🚬
 

Paul2

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Man that was quick!

The face of the protests in Myanmar has drastically changed. In a couple of days, it looks like just another Hong Kong protest
A big difference, Burmese can actually follow on their "manual," unlike HK umbrella crowd.

The police forbade HK protests, and they evaporated overnight. Burmese know better what it takes it seems, and are ready to see it through to the bitter end. I know Burmese are very big on the vendetta culture, pretty much like Sicilians, or Albanians. 一不做,二不休
 
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bbccdd1470

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Try harder
I did, but the HK police didn't forbid the protests at least not the beginning, and the violence started exactly the same day as their first claimed "one million" protest ( just the whole media covered it up, even us the one has lived here received the information months later). Also just a few days before the first protest against the bill, there was an incident where someone threw a petrol bomb in front of the police headquarter (we considered that a very first signal for the whole color revolution in HK). I would say HK riot was also premeditated back to at least occupied Central or even way back to who knows.
 

Paul2

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I did, but the HK police didn't forbid the protests at least not the beginning, and the violence started exactly the same day as their first claimed "one million" protest ( just the whole media covered it up, even us the one has lived here received the information months later). Also just a few days before the first protest against the bill, there was an incident where someone threw a petrol bomb in front of the police headquarter (we considered that a very first signal for the whole color revolution in HK). I would say HK riot was also premeditated back to at least occupied Central or even way back to who knows.
If you want a revolution, you should be prepared for detention, and jail being the least of things thrown on you.

An act of putting your life on the line rather lacks a point to it, if you plan to run away from the fight from the beginning.

Act of war without a will to win it, is just a meaningless waste of soldiers' lives.
 
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bbccdd1470

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If you want a revolution, you should be prepared for detention, and jail being the least of things thrown on you.

An act of putting your life on the line rather lacks a point to it, if you plan to run away from the fight from the beginning.

Act of war without a will to win it, is just a waste of soldiers' lives.
That explains HK people have lived in very unjust and oppressed society are most likely misleaded BS by the anti china media. The truth is beside the crazy housing price, most of the HK people are enjoying the first rated health care, welfares, safe environment and good foods, where as it also self-explains why those anti-China elements lack the will and determination to fight once the national security laws are applied to HK.
 

casual

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A big difference, Burmese can actually follow on their "manual," unlike HK umbrella crowd.

The police forbade HK protests, and they evaporated overnight. Burmese know better what it takes it seems, and are ready to see it through to the bitter end. I know Burmese are very big on the vendetta culture, pretty much like Sicilians, or Albanians. 一不做,二不休
another big difference is Burmese military will use lethal force unlike HK police. Those plastic shields don't do anything against AKs
 

Galactic Penguin SST

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another big difference is Burmese military will use lethal force unlike HK police. Those plastic shields don't do anything against AKs
Too many events in the last few days, but pictures would be banned as per forum rules (gore).

In short, Milk Tea Alliance escalating the level of violence, and getting ever tougher as the more casualties, the more likely the foreign Europeans intervention: plastic shields being upgraded to metal ones!



https://archive.vn/VBsq5/af1141b3ff4a171b8781a097c466f8825d05a019.jpg ; https://archive.vn/VBsq5/824b70eb2522372f2255400d0356a31434c2d9d3/scr.png ; http://web.archive.org/web/20210305120411/https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EuUmDjzVEAA_KAP?format=jpg&name=900x900
1. In their own words: nothing short of an U.S. military occupation!

Soon we will see these traitors wave U.S. and E.U. flags and chant the "Ode to Joy", "The Star-Spangled Banner" along "Ein Heller und ein Batzen"!

Also walls of rubber tire that can stop all advance by the police when set on fire!

Free distribution of gears before the demonstration (riots): google, mask, etc

Clearly Burmese protestors have surpassed Hong Kong: proof video showing Burmese police retreating when trying the march on baricades under the combined shower of molotov cocktails, bricks, fire extinguisher smoke and batons!



https://archive.is/fPOA0/b80a28fba1cd23c47def771b56a8f1bbb6eec1dc.jpg ; https://archive.is/fPOA0/a13376a8d3487cb2d4dbfd77fa0b8aabcbd03a08/scr.png ; http://web.archive.org/web/20210305111803/https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EvtGwQjXcAE0NCC?format=jpg&name=large
2. Plastic shields being upgraded to metal ones!


https://archive.vn/ZhIdx/1d1e9b5a598c20685df2112f9594ed08f94c9b56.jpg ; https://archive.vn/ZhIdx/4f8de5fc050a3923c67947274f9cb9d21e6823c4/scr.png ; http://web.archive.org/web/20210305112044/https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EvsMPuGVcAAyPA5?format=jpg&name=4096x4096
3. Plastic shields being upgraded to metal ones!


https://archive.vn/mwZw9/84e18776f006716ff63f33fd7e52943085b0d3f3.jpg ; https://archive.vn/mwZw9/38652c4a3d82e1f6ea92df47c08b62ebc04c6866/scr.png ; http://web.archive.org/web/20210305112134/https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EvpSadBXUAkxz1A?format=jpg&name=4096x4096
3. Plastic shields being upgraded to metal ones!


https://archive.vn/KOVRs/07fbdf326332d82dcf5de8bfd57906c161ced4e3.jpg ; https://archive.vn/KOVRs/a13635d3476264522aa861862333f0d44ba9d970/scr.png ; http://web.archive.org/web/20210305112323/https://pbs.twimg.com/media/Evh8UdkXAAAQK9o?format=jpg&name=large
4. Baricade made of rubber tyres, ready to be set on fire.


https://archive.vn/ojAub/87599048c438988c9e95fcafb90f7f656da4ca2a.jpg ; https://archive.vn/ojAub/dd0eb989ae6b84cb4efd2d99a2a94508bbad5595/scr.png ; http://web.archive.org/web/20210305112406/https://pbs.twimg.com/media/Evtbqa0XEAAoScP?format=jpg&name=900x900
5. New technique developed to treat tear gas reported: unknown result.

Meanwhile Israeli Uzi submachine guns reported to be used lately and even paratroopers.


https://archive.vn/0sQ1R/1904e3b53bb8e668972db4812f7e205076385328.jpg ; https://archive.vn/0sQ1R/add38dfeb93c83d23a863ba95410ac48480abebe/scr.png ; http://web.archive.org/web/20210305112547/https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EvtkjZ5VcAsBrZn?format=jpg&name=medium
6. Paratroopers from army were seen above the sky of Yangon on March 5 at noon. Still haven't heard any other news concerning with these paratroopers.




 

Beast

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I think myanmar junta lose the plot. Clearly, they are very unpopular with deep corruption and ill efficient to deal with local needs.

Even their UN ambassador spokesmen abandon the junta. While the people movement is getting stronger and stronger even with rising violence. I heard a number of myanmar security forces refuse to obey junta order.

Clearly, this is different from HK protesting and they have genuine concern against military government bad governing.

China shall prepare for topple of military junta or even support the myanmar people's movement
 

KurtisBrian

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look at all that equipment the "protestors" have. Somebody is funding those people. Soros? Israelis? US R1b German Canaanites? Use the greedy people to loot the nation for the benefit of Europe, Japan, Israelis and ABCANz nations.
 

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