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BUET beats IIT to become Asia West champion in Moscow programming contest

DrJekyll

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Aren't East Asians, namely Japan, South Korea, and now, China, the most innovative place on earth? They produce the most patents per capita on earth. And generally score a lot higher in any of the innovation indexes, relative to most major western countries.

Take Britain. It's not in the top 8 I think. But it has this reputation as being a land of innovators. This may have been historically true when she was the only show on the town, as the industrial revolution took off here. And in some areas, like research and scientific output, she is still a force to be reckoned with. However, she scores quite poorly on industrial innovation. That is to say, a lot of the cutting-edge research pumped out by her universities doesn't end up in the industry. Britain scores poorly on industrial innovation as a result

And a huge chunk of that scientific output produced here is by authors/researchers who don't even have a Briitish passport, with names like Huang and Sharma. It's the same case in the US. Anglo Saxons just aren't technically minded these days, other than a very small group.

Remember how the West claimed to hold a monopoly on all things innovation. They still do to an extent. Remember how Japanese cars were ridiculed as cheap knock-offs. If you have time, read the British intelligence report of the Japanese during WW2. They described the Japanese as follows;

"For a combination of genetic and environmental factors, Japanese were regarding as lacking in aptitude for machines, an effective sense of balance, and the capacity for innovation"

Right before they got their arse kicked by the IJN and IJA in Singapore LMFAO. Possibly the most humiliating defeat of a major power in that conflict. Brit's famously overestimated themselves and their equipment and underestimated the Japs. And now, they're doing the same thing with the Chinese.

I find the bit "lacking inaptitude of machines" especially funny. Considering everyone uses top-quality Japanese machine tools to make stuff in their industry. Japanese cars are vastly superior to anything Britain makes, and the world agrees. Britain is full of Japanese products. Japan isn't full of British ones. Because even Britain isn't filled with British products. British industrial base is a wasteland. Japan maintained a world-class industrial base in spite of decades of economic stagnation. Britain can't keep her industries in the best of times. That doesn't happen in REAL innovative countries.

Anglo Saxons are naturally quite confident people, even when they don't know what they're talking about. Asians have more humility and are often too polite for their own good. Therefore, AngloSAxons can come across as more authoritative, and therefore, "innovative" to some people. And the fact that they tend to (on average) go into "creative" fields like the arts, plays into that stereotype.


PS: Cultural stereotypes I know. And many Asians are following that pattern (*ahem* Japan). Getting too comfortable in hubris, overestimating your capabilities, and underestimating others. It's a natural pattern. It's how one civilization overtakes another I guess.

These are excellent points. I have always admired the Japanese for punching waaay above their weight. It is a remote group of islands, mostly cold and not strategically located. Yet, for decades they have continued to be an industrial powerhouse. Of late though there are increasing reports of fatigue and loneliness among its people, and maybe they need to review some of their practices. But rebuilding your country from devastation comes at great personal cost that every citizen has to pay. There is no magic potion.

Brits are world champions at stereotyping, though I will admit that among all colonial powers they were least brutal. The French, Belgians, Spanish and Portuguese literally butchered local populations like wild game. Paradoxically, Brits also have a tendency of studying human nature closely (but somehow they get stuck at initial impressions). This has worked to their advantage historically as they could manipulate local populations.
 

Sainthood 101

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congratulations BUET on ur team's accompolishments.
no pakistani universities participated in this event ???

castiest bastard.
Pakistanis are stupid they can't compete with high IQ indians and Banglas because we do not possess Hindus like bangla and India

Only high IQ Hindus can win these competitions!!!
These are excellent points. I have always admired the Japanese for punching waaay above their weight. It is a remote group of islands, mostly cold and not strategically located. Yet, for decades they have continued to be an industrial powerhouse. Of late though there are increasing reports of fatigue and loneliness among its people, and maybe they need to review some of their practices. But rebuilding your country from devastation comes at great personal cost that every citizen has to pay. There is no magic potion.

Brits are world champions at stereotyping, though I will admit that among all colonial powers they were least brutal. The French, Belgians, Spanish and Portuguese literally butchered local populations like wild game. Paradoxically, Brits also have a tendency of studying human nature closely (but somehow they get stuck at initial impressions). This has worked to their advantage historically as they could manipulate local populations.
Study south asia, carrabien hell even parts of Africa

I have mad respect for British, they knew how to exploit divisions of local societies without looking like the bad guys (Belgian with thier Hutu and Tutsis looked like the bad guys but British did similar segeragation among local people but unknowingly in a very shady manner

Look how they exited the world stage

Handed over power to Thier cousins of sorts in US

From 1700s till even now they're playing the game very smartly
 
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Chhatrapati

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Successful in India is also the Royal Enfield company which produces those noisy motorcycles. Successful in India is also some company which manufactures dog clothing.

You remove Infosys and TCS from the industry and the industry will lose nothing. :)
If we remove TCS and Infosys close to $50 billions of business shift to other companies. Your arguments are getting weaker and pointless. Every other company that exists today is expendable.
 

jamahir

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Not trying to second guess or speaking FOR HIM though.

No bhai, you are right. I really wish for South Asians to become innovative in various fields, whether computers or housing and office design, or spaceship development etc. :) About the last, I have mentioned three Indian companies in post# 34.

Well @jamahir is justified on asking in multiple occasions as to why a new "consumer OS" is NOT being developed till now? ... IMHO creating a new "consumer OS" is "might be" NOT that trivial for some as now there are IT Companies in the South East Asia region which have enough resources (Financial and Scientific) to implement the new one... BUT the argument is NOT that simple. For a new "Consumer OS" to compete effectively you need to make sure you have full grasp on the existing and future hardware advancements which your new "consumer OS" will be interacting. You will required to write device drivers of a plethora of hardware out there that would require dedicated support from all existing well established hardware vendors...but why would they entertain someone totally new on the block without any measurable incentive for them...so in extreme case (very unlikely) you will have to develop your own compatible hardware ... Moreover, you will be required to do R&D as the advancement in hardware is progressing really fast and keeping your OS to run effectively on them will definitely a challenge and after a considerable amount of time when your 'consumer OS" established monopoly only then your OS will dictate the hardware vendors to tweak their product to align with the minimum requirements of your OS.

And lastly, even after developing one breaking the monopoly of the existing top ones is very very tough. it is equivalent to initiating a war...

1. About driver complexity, well, if we are talking about common computers nowadays most hardware is built into the system board ( audio and graphics especially ) and peripherals are connected through USB and these mostly follow common standard except for things like gaming items. Also connected to gaming and multimedia design would be a new graphics card. Now isn't there Linux which have become popular and hardware vendors write drivers ? Why can't be there say a new South Asian OS for which these vendors can be encouraged to write drivers ?

2. And I am not talking about an OS for regular use but one that can be used as a reliable, secure and real-time platform for various scientific, commercial and machine-control needs. In fact the Indian military body DRDO declared such a project in 2010 :
The Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) is working on creating a futuristic computing system, including India's own operating system, said V.K. Saraswat, Scientific Adviser to the Defence Minister and DRDO Director-General.

Talking to journalists after inaugurating the DRDO Transit Facility here on Saturday, Dr. Saraswat said: “We do not have our own operating system. Today, various bodies, including banks and defence establishments, need security. Having our own operating system will help us prevent hacking of our systems.”

Two software engineering centres are being set up for this purpose in Bangalore and New Delhi. “To start with, we will have 25 scientists at each of these centres. We are in touch with institutes such as the Indian Institute of Science, Indian Institute of Technology Madras and the Centre for Development of Telematics, besides universities and industries. We will use available talent.” Citing security reasons, he refused to provide details of organisations involved in the project.

The new operating system would also have commercial use, he said and added: “With a home-grown system, the source code will be with us and it helps in securing our systems,” he said. Asked about the money involved for the project and the timeframe, Dr. Saraswat said it was fairly a costly affair, without elaborating on the timeframe.
Unfortunately DRDO hasn't come out with anything now after 11 years.


Well, HarmonyOS v2 looks exciting and an innovation by Huawei / China externally and one or two Chinese members here have spoken about it but in this post of mine I found the reality of this OS. Certainly it is not another Android Linux distro like HarmonyOS v1 but it really is a derivation of an international project called Barrelfish OS.

If we remove TCS and Infosys close to $50 billions of business shift to other companies.

So be it. Let those two restart from scratch and produce an OS, a microprocessor, novel storage methods etc. Let them go into fundamental computing research.

Every other company that exists today is expendable.

What about some cement plant ? Some iron mining company ? Some fertilizer factory ? SpaceX ? Relativity Space ? Bellatrix Aerospace ( Bangalore ) ? Siemens ? Apple ? etc.
 
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baajey

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Pakistanis are stupid they can't compete with high IQ indians and Banglas because we do not possess Hindus like bangla and India

Only high IQ Hindus can win these competitions!!!
i m sorry u took it the wrong way. i was simply curious. maybe, my sentence construction is to be blamed.
anyway, i apologize for hurting ur feelings. hope that we can put these trivialities behind.
 

Chhatrapati

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So be it. Let those two start from scratch and produce an OS, a microprocessor, novel storage methods etc. Let them go into fundamental computing research.
Yeah no. We need em, let there be more infosys TCS etc... The rest will follow.
What about some cement plant ? Some iron mining company ? Some fertilizer factory ? SpaceX ? Relativity Space ? Bellatrix Aerospace ( Bangalore ) ? Siemens ? Apple ? etc.
What about them. In a corporate world if one company goes down 10 will be ready to take it's place.
 

EyelessInGaza

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Wah - most sensible post I have heard from anyone at PDF - your attitude deserves Kudos! :cheers:

Thanks.

I take back my bad-mouthing of Bhakt Indians and should do far less of it. It was reactionary behavior against Hindu supremacists and andh-bhakts mostly.

We need more Indians like you, with feet realistically planted firmly in the ground, seeing stuff for what it actually is.

However - in defense of @jamahir bhai, what he was suggesting is that we in the subcontinent are just specializing in merely 9-5 subsistence (buying houses for future generations and squeezing out a few puppies) rather than individual efforts at doing something truly extra-ordinary.

Not trying to second guess or speaking FOR HIM though.

But I realize you can only have those efforts, when the basic minimum requirements of health, hygiene are met.

Like how the West gained improved standards of living (and eventually innovation which followed it) by stealing/looting from less clueful people in the subcontinent (like us).

Well done on a very mature reply. As an Indian I appreciate it.
 

Naofumi

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Well looks like Indian talent took a second seat to Bangladesh talent. Knew this all along.

Where are the Bhakt chest-beaters claiming Indian supremacy in prraaag-rumming ?

I posited long ago that there is little real talent that Indian ICT majors pass on to the West.

Its mostly four-month corner-market-course-graduate IT coolies whose work is pi$$ poor at best, as we have all seen in US corporate circles...

Fifteen unsuccessful attempts at compiling code, that too with five IT coolies jointly trying to edit each others' work. What a sad excuse for 'talent'.
Too early to celebrate a win. This competition while prestigious in its own right plays a very negligible role in advanced computer science research and impact. You can see that many renowned universities like Carnegie Mellon University ranks much lower (#62) [1] and even then their team probably consists of Asian/Indian immigrants as only Asians/Eastern Europeans bother with such stuff.
Indian headstart in actual research is much larger and wider.
Some long standing CS wins by Indians :
Gödel Prize
The Gödel Prize is an annual prize for outstanding papers in the area of theoretical computer science, given jointly by European Association for Theoretical Computer Science (EATCS) and the Association for Computing Machinery Special Interest Group on Algorithms and Computational Theory (ACM SIGACT). The award is named in honor of Kurt Gödel. Gödel's connection to theoretical computer science is that he was the first to mention the "P versus NP" question, in a 1956 letter to John von Neumann in which Gödel asked whether a certain NP-complete problem could be solved in quadratic or linear time.[1]
Indian wins ;

  1. Sanjeev Arora - Twice winner. Born in Jodhpur, India.
  2. Rajeev Motwani - Born in Jammu.
  3. Madhu Sudan - Born in Chennai
  4. Manindra Agrawal - Born in Allahabad
  5. Neeraj Kayal - Born in Guhawati
  6. Nitin Saxena - Born in Allahabad

Nevanlinna Prize
The Rolf Nevanlinna Prize, known from 2022 as the IMU Abacus Medal,[1] is awarded once every four years at the International Congress of Mathematicians, hosted by the International Mathematical Union (IMU), for outstanding contributions in Mathematical Aspects of Information Sciences including:
  1. All mathematical aspects of computer science, including computational complexity theory, logic of programming languages, analysis of algorithms, cryptography, computer vision, pattern recognition, information processing and modelling of intelligence.
  2. Scientific computing and numerical analysis. Computational aspects of optimization and control theory. Computer algebra.

  1. Madhu Sudan - Born in Chennai
  2. Subhash Khot Born in Ichalkaranji, Maharashtra, India
Turing Award (Nobel Prize of CS)
The ACM A. M. Turing Award is an annual prize given by the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) for contributions "of lasting and major technical importance to the computer field".[2] It is generally recognized as the highest distinction in computer science and is known as or often referred to as "Nobel Prize of Computing".[3][4][5][6]
Raj Reddy - One of the two non-white Turing Award winner.

Then there are Indian engineers like Sanjay Ghemawat who built companies like Google from scratch and are considered equal peers with one of the best Software scientists like Jeff Deans. [3]

One day in March of 2000, six of Google’s best engineers gathered in a makeshift war room. The company was in the midst of an unprecedented emergency. In October, its core systems, which crawled the Web to build an “index” of it, had stopped working. Although users could still type in queries at google.com, the results they received were five months out of date. More was at stake than the engineers realized. Google’s co-founders, Larry Page and Sergey Brin, were negotiating a deal to power a search engine for Yahoo, and they’d promised to deliver an index ten times bigger than the one they had at the time—one capable of keeping up with the World Wide Web, which had doubled in size the previous year. If they failed, google.com would remain a time capsule, the Yahoo deal would likely collapse, and the company would risk burning through its funding into oblivion.
In a conference room by a set of stairs, the engineers laid doors across sawhorses and set up their computers. Craig Silverstein, a twenty-seven-year-old with a small frame and a high voice, sat by the far wall. Silverstein was Google’s first employee: he’d joined the company when its offices were in Brin’s living room and had rewritten much of its code himself. After four days and nights, he and a Romanian systems engineer named Bogdan Cocosel had got nowhere. “None of the analysis we were doing made any sense,” Silverstein recalled. “Everything was broken, and we didn’t know why.”
Silverstein had barely registered the presence, over his left shoulder, of Sanjay Ghemawat, a quiet thirty-three-year-old M.I.T. graduate with thick eyebrows and black hair graying at the temples. Sanjay had joined the company only a few months earlier, in December. He’d followed a colleague of his—a rangy, energetic thirty-one-year-old named Jeff Dean—from Digital Equipment Corporation. Jeff had left D.E.C. ten months before Sanjay. They were unusually close, and preferred to write code jointly. In the war room, Jeff rolled his chair over to Sanjay’s desk, leaving his own empty. Sanjay worked the keyboard while Jeff reclined beside him, correcting and cajoling like a producer in a news anchor’s ear.


Jeff and Sanjay began poring over the stalled index. They discovered that some words were missing—they’d search for “mailbox” and get no results—and that others were listed out of order. For days, they looked for flaws in the code, immersing themselves in its logic. Section by section, everything checked out. They couldn’t find the bug.
Programmers sometimes conceptualize their software as a structure of layers ranging from the user interface, at the top, down through increasingly fundamental strata. To venture into the bottom of this structure, where the software meets the hardware, is to turn away from the Platonic order of code and toward the elemental universe of electricity and silicon on which it depends. On their fifth day in the war room, Jeff and Sanjay began to suspect that the problem they were looking for was not logical but physical. They converted the jumbled index file to its rawest form of representation: binary code. They wanted to see what their machines were seeing.
On Sanjay’s monitor, a thick column of 1s and 0s appeared, each row representing an indexed word. Sanjay pointed: a digit that should have been a 0 was a 1. When Jeff and Sanjay put all the missorted words together, they saw a pattern—the same sort of glitch in every word. Their machines’ memory chips had somehow been corrupted.

Sanjay looked at Jeff. For months, Google had been experiencing an increasing number of hardware failures. The problem was that, as Google grew, its computing infrastructure also expanded. Computer hardware rarely failed, until you had enough of it—then it failed all the time. Wires wore down, hard drives fell apart, motherboards overheated. Many machines never worked in the first place; some would unaccountably grow slower. Strange environmental factors came into play. When a supernova explodes, the blast wave creates high-energy particles that scatter in every direction; scientists believe there is a minute chance that one of the errant particles, known as a cosmic ray, can hit a computer chip on Earth, flipping a 0 to a 1. The world’s most robust computer systems, at nasa, financial firms, and the like, used special hardware that could tolerate single bit-flips. But Google, which was still operating like a startup, bought cheaper computers that lacked that feature. The company had reached an inflection point. Its computing cluster had grown so big that even unlikely hardware failures were inevitable.
Together, Jeff and Sanjay wrote code to compensate for the offending machines. Shortly afterward, the new index was completed, and the war room disbanded. Silverstein was flummoxed. He was a good debugger; the key to finding bugs was getting to the bottom of things. Jeff and Sanjay had gone deeper.
Until the March index debacle, Google’s systems had been rooted in code that its founders had written in grad school, at Stanford. Page and Brin weren’t professional software engineers. They were academics conducting an experiment in search technology. When their Web crawler crashed, there was no informative diagnostic message—just the phrase “Whoa, horsey!” Early employees referred to BigFiles, a piece of software that Page and Brin had written, as BugFiles. Their all-important indexing code took days to finish, and if it encountered a problem it had to re-start from the beginning. In the parlance of Silicon Valley, Google wasn’t “scalable.”
We say that we “search the Web,” but we don’t, really; our search engines traverse an index of the Web—a map. When Google was still called BackRub, in 1996, its map was small enough to fit on computers installed in Page’s dorm room. In March of 2000, there was no supercomputer big enough to process it. The only way that Google could keep up was by buying consumer machines and wiring them together into a fleet. Because half the cost of these computers was in parts that Google considered junk—floppy drives, metal chassis—the company would order raw motherboards and hard drives and sandwich them together. Google had fifteen hundred of these devices stacked in towers six feet high, in a building in Santa Clara, California; because of hardware glitches, only twelve hundred worked. Failures, which occurred seemingly at random, kept breaking the system. To survive, Google would have to unite its computers into a seamless, resilient whole.
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Surfing on Kelly Slater’s Machine-Made Wave

Side by side, Jeff and Sanjay took charge of this effort. Wayne Rosing, who had worked at Apple on the precursor to the Macintosh, joined Google in November, 2000, to run its hundred-person engineering team. “They were the leaders,” he said. Working ninety-hour weeks, they wrote code so that a single hard drive could fail without bringing down the entire system. They added checkpoints to the crawling process so that it could be re-started midstream. By developing new encoding and compression schemes, they effectively doubled the system’s capacity. They were relentless optimizers. When a car goes around a turn, more ground must be covered by the outside wheels; likewise, the outer edge of a spinning hard disk moves faster than the inner one. Google had moved the most frequently accessed data to the outside, so that bits could flow faster under the read-head, but had left the inner half empty; Jeff and Sanjay used the space to store preprocessed data for common search queries. Over four days in 2001, they proved that Google’s index could be stored using fast random-access memory instead of relatively slow hard drives; the discovery reshaped the company’s economics. Page and Brin knew that users would flock to a service that delivered answers instantly. The problem was that speed required computing power, and computing power cost money. Jeff and Sanjay threaded the needle with software.
Alan Eustace became the head of the engineering team after Rosing left, in 2005. “To solve problems at scale, paradoxically, you have to know the smallest details,” Eustace said. Jeff and Sanjay understood computers at the level of bits. Jeff once circulated a list of “Latency Numbers Every Programmer Should Know.” In fact, it’s a list of numbers that almost no programmer knows: that an L1 cache reference usually takes half a nanosecond, or that reading one megabyte sequentially from memory takes two hundred and fifty microseconds. These numbers are hardwired into Jeff’s and Sanjay’s brains. As they helped spearhead several rewritings of Google’s core software, the system’s capacity scaled by orders of magnitude. Meanwhile, in the company’s vast data centers technicians now walked in serpentine routes, following software-generated instructions to replace hard drives, power supplies, and memory sticks. Even as its parts wore out and died, the system thrived.
Today, Google’s engineers exist in a Great Chain of Being that begins at Level 1. At the bottom are the I.T. support staff. Level 2s are fresh out of college; Level 3s often have master’s degrees. Getting to Level 4 takes several years, or a Ph.D. Most progression stops at Level 5. Level 6 engineers—the top ten per cent—are so capable that they could be said to be the reason a project succeeds; Level 7s are Level 6s with a long track record. Principal Engineers, the Level 8s, are associated with a major product or piece of infrastructure. Distinguished Engineers, the Level 9s, are spoken of with reverence. To become a Google Fellow, a Level 10, is to win an honor that will follow you for life. Google Fellows are usually the world’s leading experts in their fields. Jeff and Sanjay are Google Senior Fellows—the company’s first and only Level 11s.
The Google campus, set beside a highway a few minutes from downtown Mountain View, is a series of squat, unattractive buildings with tinted windows. One Monday last summer, after a morning of programming together, Jeff and Sanjay went to lunch at a campus cafeteria called Big Table, which was named for a system they’d helped develop, in 2005, for treating numberless computers as though they were a single database. Sanjay, who is tall and thin, wore an ancient maroon Henley, gray pants, and small wire-frame glasses. He spied a table outside and walked briskly to claim it, cranking open the umbrella and taking a seat in the shade. He moved another chair into the sun for Jeff, who arrived a minute later, broad-shouldered in a short-sleeved shirt and wearing stylish sneakers.
Like a couple, Jeff and Sanjay tell stories together by contributing pieces of the total picture. They began reminiscing about their early projects.“Behold, as I transform this normal woman into a sexualized prop.”
https://www.facebook.com/dialog/fee...m_brand=the-new-yorker&utm_social-type=earned
“We were writing things by hand,” Sanjay said. His glasses darkened in the sun. “We’d rewrite it, and it was, like, ‘Oh, that seems near to what we wrote last month.’ ”

“Or a slightly different pass in our indexing data,” Jeff added.
“Or slightly different,” Sanjay said. “And that’s how we figure out—”
“This is the essence,” Jeff said.
“—this is the common pattern,” Sanjay said, finishing their thought.
Jeff took a bite of the pizza he’d got. He has the fingers of a deckhand, knobby and leathery; Sanjay, who looks almost delicate in comparison, wondered how they ended up as a pair. “I don’t quite know how we decided that it would be better,” he said.


Also, look at the bachelor alma mater of CS faculty at top US Universities [2]

Where do most professors get their bachelors from?

These are the universities with at least 10 BSc alumns that provide the largest number of BSc among the professors in 50 top universities.

Massachusetts Institute of Technology - USA117
Bachelors UniversityNumber of Professors
Harvard University - USA66
Cornell University - USA46
University of California - Berkeley - USA43
Indian Institute of Technology - Madras - India37
Tsinghua University - Beijing - China33
Indian Institute of Technology - Kanpur - India32
Stanford University - USA32
Princeton University - USA32
Carnegie Mellon University - USA31
Brown University - USA29
Yale University - USA25
Indian Institute of Technology - Bombay - India24
Rice University - USA23
University of Michigan - USA21
Georgia Institute of Technology - USA20
California Institute of Technology - USA19
Indian Institute of Technology - Delhi - India19
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign - USA18
University of Science and Technology of China - China18
Duke University - USA17
Indian Institute of Technology - Kharagpur - India16
Peking University - Beijing - China16
University of California - Los Angeles - USA15
National Taiwan University - Taipei - Taiwan15
Columbia University - USA14
University of Toronto - Canada14
Pennsylvania State University - USA14
University of Texas - Austin - USA13
Technion-Israel Institute of Technology - Israel13
National Technical University of Athens - Greece13
Purdue University - USA12
University of Wisconsin - Madison - USA12
Hebrew University of Jerusalem - Israel12
Polytechnic University of Bucharest - Romania11
Dartmouth College - USA11
Birla Institute of Technology and Science - Pilani - India10

Funnily enough. If you consider the undergraduates on a per capita basis. IITs come close to to top world universities as intake of MIT is four times larger than the largest IIT (Kharagpur).

Not only that, India houses development centers for FAANG except for FB and Netflix while there are none in the rest of the region.

Google world offices [4]
Screenshot (74).png



Same goes for Apple, Amazon, Microsoft, Uber and other tech giants (can't find maps for them LMAO but the info is available on their careers sites and wiki itself). Also, if you think that these jobs are for "coolies", better check the compensation details here https://leetcode.com/discuss/compensation.

[1] The ICPC International Collegiate Programming Contest
[2] 2200 Computer Science Professors in 50 top US Graduate Programs (brown.edu)
[3] The Friendship That Made Google Huge | The New Yorker
[4] Our Locations (about.google)
 

Bilal9

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Too early to celebrate a win. This competition while prestigious in its own right plays a very negligible role in advanced computer science research and impact. You can see that many renowned universities like Carnegie Mellon University ranks much lower (#62) [1] and even then their team probably consists of Asian/Indian immigrants as only Asians/Eastern Europeans bother with such stuff.
Indian headstart in actual research is much larger and wider.
Some long standing CS wins by Indians :
Gödel Prize

Indian wins ;

  1. Sanjeev Arora - Twice winner. Born in Jodhpur, India.
  2. Rajeev Motwani - Born in Jammu.
  3. Madhu Sudan - Born in Chennai
  4. Manindra Agrawal - Born in Allahabad
  5. Neeraj Kayal - Born in Guhawati
  6. Nitin Saxena - Born in Allahabad

Nevanlinna Prize
  1. Madhu Sudan - Born in Chennai
  2. Subhash Khot Born in Ichalkaranji, Maharashtra, India
Turing Award (Nobel Prize of CS)

Raj Reddy - One of the two non-white Turing Award winner.

Then there are Indian engineers like Sanjay Ghemawat who built companies like Google from scratch and are considered equal peers with one of the best Software scientists like Jeff Deans. [3]


Also, look at the bachelor alma mater of CS faculty at top US Universities [2]

Where do most professors get their bachelors from?

These are the universities with at least 10 BSc alumns that provide the largest number of BSc among the professors in 50 top universities.

Bachelors UniversityNumber of Professors
Massachusetts Institute of Technology - USA117
Harvard University - USA66
Cornell University - USA46
University of California - Berkeley - USA43
Indian Institute of Technology - Madras - India37
Tsinghua University - Beijing - China33
Indian Institute of Technology - Kanpur - India32
Stanford University - USA32
Princeton University - USA32
Carnegie Mellon University - USA31
Brown University - USA29
Yale University - USA25
Indian Institute of Technology - Bombay - India24
Rice University - USA23
University of Michigan - USA21
Georgia Institute of Technology - USA20
California Institute of Technology - USA19
Indian Institute of Technology - Delhi - India19
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign - USA18
University of Science and Technology of China - China18
Duke University - USA17
Indian Institute of Technology - Kharagpur - India16
Peking University - Beijing - China16
University of California - Los Angeles - USA15
National Taiwan University - Taipei - Taiwan15
Columbia University - USA14
University of Toronto - Canada14
Pennsylvania State University - USA14
University of Texas - Austin - USA13
Technion-Israel Institute of Technology - Israel13
National Technical University of Athens - Greece13
Purdue University - USA12
University of Wisconsin - Madison - USA12
Hebrew University of Jerusalem - Israel12
Polytechnic University of Bucharest - Romania11
Dartmouth College - USA11
Birla Institute of Technology and Science - Pilani - India10

Funnily enough. If you consider the undergraduates on a per capita basis. IITs come close to to top world universities as intake of MIT is four times larger than the largest IIT (Kharagpur).

Not only that, India houses development centers for FAANG except for FB and Netflix while there are none in the rest of the region.

Google world offices [4]
View attachment 785797


Same goes for Apple, Amazon, Microsoft, Uber and other tech giants (can't find maps for them LMAO but the info is available on their careers sites and wiki itself). Also, if you think that these jobs are for "coolies", better check the compensation details here https://leetcode.com/discuss/compensation.

[1] The ICPC International Collegiate Programming Contest
[2] 2200 Computer Science Professors in 50 top US Graduate Programs (brown.edu)
[3] The Friendship That Made Google Huge | The New Yorker
[4] Our Locations (about.google)

@jamahir bhai - we have another Hindutva supremacist chest beater.... :-)
 

jamahir

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@jamahir bhai - we have another Hindutva supremacist chest beater.... :-)

No bhai, @Naofumi is a Muslim and a sensible one :) but in his current college life he seems not be in company of progressive / leftist activists so he sometimes does go overly nationalist and sometimes makes non-delicate posts that say if 350,000+ Indian farmers committed suicide just within 20 years it can be explained away by saying it is but a minuscule percentage of India's population. Naofumi, you know I respect you but do consider above.
 

Naofumi

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but in his current college life he seems not be in company of progressive / leftist activists so he sometimes does go overly nationalist
Umm, putting some facts about your educational institutions is Hindutvawadi supremacist since when? You have to be yes-man of Bangladeshis to be considered a progressive?
sometimes makes non-delicate posts that say if 350,000+ Indian farmers committed suicide just within 20 years it can be explained away by saying it is but a minuscule percentage of India's population.
Man, please put a counter-argument how farmers are worse off as a occupational group than other groups like businessmen or employees. You should never use rhetorical phrases as the core part of your argument.
 

jamahir

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Umm, putting some facts about your educational institutions is Hindutvawadi supremacist since when? You have to be yes-man of Bangladeshis to be considered a progressive?

I am not calling on you to be a yes man but was just wondering why you posted this list :
All of these are redundant people, so-called senior scientists and been students of IIT-This IIT-That, but between them haven't even designed a single item among the two fundamental elements in a classic binary computer - the microprocessor and the operating system. And the fourth person and the sixth person are even close to the Hindutvadi dispensation. Look at Agarwal's tweets.

Man, please put a counter-argument how farmers are worse off as a occupational group than other groups like businessmen or employees. You should never use rhetorical phrases as the core part of your argument.

I don't know what you mean by "Rhetoric" but if you go through my post history I make simple points. Remember the question I had asked you in the Infosys thread ? And taking your own argument of other occupational groups, imagine if 350,000+ Indian IT / ITES workers had committed suicide, wouldn't the selectively-outraging and religion-and-regressiveness-bound middle class have been outraged ? Let's start from here.
 

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I am not calling on you to be a yes man but was just wondering why you posted this list :
The only thing the list have common is academic excellence at some point in their life. I don't know (or care about) their current political leanings and their political leaning doesn't invalidate their academic record.
but between them haven't even designed a single item among the two fundamental elements in a classic binary computer - the microprocessor and the operating system.
First of all, these are not classics at all in theoretical computer science. Problems like P=NP have much more significant bearing on our future progress.
Any reasonable person or team who manages to resolve the P vs NP problem would publish their work in a prestigious math or CS journal of their choosing, likely the Annals of Mathematics or the Journal of the ACM or something like that.

In parallel, they would embark on a world tour of invited talks, to explain the main ideas of the proof and how the details work, so that others could learn about them and see what further discoveries can be made with such a monumental breakthrough.

They can also safely expect to be awarded any number of mathematical and theoretical-computer-science prizes and medals, including the Clay Mathematics Institute award specifically aimed for solvers of P vs NP.

If there's a particular university whose math or CS department they've always wanted to join, they can likely initiate a discreet conversation with the hiring committee of that institution. In all likelihood, they will be approached before even having to take that step. They will probably have a conversation with their family before making any decisions, and if everyone agrees it's the right thing to do, they will move to that location during the summer (winter in Boston can be quite nasty, though Jerusalem isn't so bad).
Read about more unsolved problems.
List of unsolved problems in computer science - Wikipedia
 

jamahir

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The only thing the list have common is academic excellence at some point in their life. I don't know (or care about) their current political leanings and their political leaning doesn't invalidate their academic record.

Come on, Naofumi. The ideological associates of those two lynched and rioted in your city last year. Would you want to be in a situation where you voluntarily have to honor those two ?

First of all, these are not classics at all in theoretical computer science.

I am a humble theoretician too in certain things and have some novel ideas but without the platform of a processor and OS how would these people you mention be able to implement their mathematics ideas ? And read the below thread of mine where these Indian computer scientists also are not working :

Problems like P=NP have much more significant bearing on our future progress.

Read about more unsolved problems.
List of unsolved problems in computer science - Wikipedia

OK, I agree that the list has some useful items for my own projects too, including Fast Fourier Transform, matrix multiplication and search trees.
 
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BUET beats IIT to become Asia West champion in Moscow programming contest

View attachment 783929
Jinat Jahan Khan, Abdus Salam Shawn
Mon Oct 11, 2021 01:53 PM
Image: Facebook

'BUET HellBent', a team from the Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology (BUET), has earned the title of the 'Champion of the Asia West' in the International Collegiate Programming Contest (ICPC) Moscow World Final 2021. Globally, it has also secured the 28th position out of 117 teams participating from over 100 countries in this prestigious yearly multi-tiered programming competition.

'BUET HellBent', a team from the Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology (BUET), has earned the title of the 'Champion of the Asia West' in the International Collegiate Programming Contest (ICPC) Moscow World Final 2021. Globally, it has also secured the 28th position out of 117 teams participating from over 100 countries in this prestigious yearly multi-tiered programming competition.

The team 'BUET HellBent', consisting of Arghya Pratim Pal (CSE-15), H M Ashiqul Islam (EEE-15) and Pritom Kundu (CSE-16) and coached by Mohammad Sohel Rahman, has overtaken the team from the Indian Institutes of Technology (IIT), Delhi to win ICPC Asia West region.

BUET HellBent participated in the preliminary competition in Bangladesh in 2019, organised by Southeast University. They came first competing against 1792 teams. The selected teams went to the next stage, ICPC Dhaka Regional 2019, where 190 teams participated. They came out on top again leading them to the world finals. The finals of 2021 were held in Moscow where the teams were given a problem set of 15 questions. BUET HellBent solved 7 of those problems making them the Asia West Champion, and securing 28th place in the global ranking.

H M Ashiqul Islam, a team member of BUET HellBent, said, "We have a strong culture in BUET when it comes to programming competitions. Our teachers arrange different contests every week, and anybody from any department can participate. We also help each other with problems which enrich our own knowledge. Moreover, it has helped us maintain good relationships with seniors and mentors, who have always mentored us and helped us."

The ICPC is one of the most prestigious programming competitions in the world, where the finest programmers and coders around the world compete to be crowned as the champion. Every year, more than 60,000 student programmers from more than 3,000 universities of 115 countries take part in the qualifying rounds.

Another team from Dhaka University, 'DU SwampFire' has also obtained the 33rd position in this event. The Nizhny Novgorod State University of Russia became the champion in the ICPC World Finals.


but why supa powa boasting being a IT supa powa all day?
 

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