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Biden’s Afghan Pullout Is a Victory for Pakistan. But at What Cost?

Dalit

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Biden will impose sanctions against Pakistan after leaving Afghanistan.
that's why he did not call PM Imran Khan.
The US is repeating the same mistake of 1989.
I really hope Biden does that. Something I have been looking forward to for a long while. That will serve as the final nail in this abhorrent relationship.

Just like we saw during last US sanctions when Pakistan stood on its own feet and finally took initiatives such as becoming a nuclear power. This time we will focus on economy and we have no better ally than China for that purpose. The Americans will lick their wounds as they see Pakistan rise.
It was terrible mishandling by the traitor Musharaf that cost Pakistan Afghanistan and gave India Kabul on a platter. The establishment in Pakistan by 2005 saw the disaster and then began to try to undo it by covertly supporting Taliban. Nearly 20 years later we are about to go back to status quo ante.

Pakistan will succeed if it can adopt a nuanced approach. It MUST make sure that whatever happens inside Afghanstan does not blowback to USA or Europe. Primarily meaning not allow any groups like AQ etc who use Afgh., to launch attacks on Western targets. As long as this condition is met Pakistan will emerge the winner.

On a secondary and lower priorty it must make sure that there is no massacres carried out by Talban and or they go full on retard with females. The reason being is this could get picked by by western media or create waves of refugees which again would put spotlight on Pakistan.

As long as these are secured Pakistan will be back to late 1990s in Afghanistan.

On another note Pakistan has in PM Imran Khan the best interlocuter on Afghanistan. Lest we forget he used to be called 'Taliban Khan'. Well that to has given him stock with the Talibs. This places him nicely to have influence on them as they know his heart was with them all along.
Nothing of that sort will happen bro. The Indians and anti-Pak Western contingent is hallucinating. These are mere fantasies. We couldn't succeed so Pakistan should also suffer now LOL Wishful thinking. Let me tell you what will happen.

China will step in and start negotiations between various factions inside Afghanistan. Why? Secure access to CAS and Afghanistan through Pakistan. Afghanistan itself is sitting on top of trillions worth of minerals.
 
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Muhammed45

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I think the article is much of a fearmongering. Its like Americans moaning : hey Pakistan, do more, forget about the past and help us to stay. Lmao
Pakistan will be ok after US withdrawal and the regional countries will work together in order to avoid civil war in Afghanistan. That's the way to go, we need to forget about the past and cooperate for the future of the region.
 

Dalit

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I think the article is much of a fearmongering. Its like Americans moaning : hey Pakistan, do more, forget about the past and help us to stay. Lmao
Pakistan will be ok after US withdrawal and the regional countries will work together in order to avoid civil war in Afghanistan. That's the way to go, we need to forget about the past and cooperate for the future of the region.
We will work together. The region isn't crazy excluding India which belongs in the US bloc. We might have differences, but we won't let this opportunity slip. Let the Americans exit.
 

Asfandyar Bhittani

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“The state was not able to control the stick-wielding and stone-hurling members of the T.L.P. that paralyzed most parts of the country for two days,” said Afrasiab Khattak, a former chairman of Pakistan’s human rights commission. “How will they handle trained, guns-carrying Taliban militants?”
Afrasiab Khattak, a surrendered militant, deserves a medal for these mental gymnastics and false equivalences. TLP is not the Afghan Taliban nor are Afghan Taliban Pakistan's enemy, if not our best of best friends. And the state of Pakistan can handle trained, guns-carrying militants. Afrasiab only needs to ask TTP and the "Apnay Bachay". They are still looking for their KIAs in the mountains of waziristan.
 

Metal 0-1

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Hope for peace in Afghanistan. It would in their best interest for both Taliban and Kabul Gov. if they sign peace deal.

Pakistan should finish the fence. Make border areas more secure. Afghan refugees should be sent back as soon as possible and those Afghan Taliban should not be trusted either because last time it didn't worked out very well.

It shouldn't be surprising US JSOC and CIA activity will be increased after troops pulled out from Afganistan.
 

Trango Towers

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When India was chosen by America to be in Afghanistan that was a red line for Pakistan. So they took out America too. Allah u akbar. The mightiest of armies gathered only to be defeated by rag heads ( now call them rag heads)
 

Ahmet Pasha

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Pakistan’s military stayed allied to both the Americans and Taliban. But now the country may face intensified extremism at home as a result of a perceived Taliban victory.

Near the peak of the American war in Afghanistan, a former chief of neighboring Pakistan’s military intelligence — an institution allied both to the U.S. military and to its Taliban adversaries — appeared on a talk show called “Joke Night” in 2014. He put a bold prediction on the record.
“When history is written,” declared Gen. Hamid Gul, who led the feared spy service known as the I.S.I. during the last stretch of the Cold War in the 1980s, “it will be stated that the I.S.I. defeated the Soviet Union in Afghanistan with the help of America.”
“Then there will be another sentence,” General Gul added after a brief pause, delivering his punchline to loud applause. “The I.S.I., with the help of America, defeated America.”
In President Biden’s decision to withdraw all American forces from Afghanistan by September, Pakistan’s powerful military establishment finally gets its wish after decades of bloody intrigue: the exit of a disruptive superpower from a backyard where the I.S.I. had established strong influence through a friendly Taliban regime before the U.S. invaded in 2001.
https://www.nytimes.com/article/afg...tion=click&module=RelatedLinks&pgtype=Article
A return of the Taliban to some form of power would dial the clock back to a time when Pakistan’s military played gatekeeper to Afghanistan, perpetually working to block the influence of its archenemy, India.

But the Pakistani military’s sheltering of the Taliban insurgency over the past two decades — doggedly pursuing a narrowly defined geopolitical victory next door — risks another wave of disruption at home. Pakistan is a fragile, nuclear-armed state already reeling from a crashed economy, waves of social unrest, agitation by oppressed minorities and a percolating Islamic militancy of its own that it is struggling to contain.

If Afghanistan descends into chaos, Pakistanis are bound to feel the burden again just as they did after Afghanistan disintegrated in the 1990s following the Soviet withdrawal. Millions of Afghan refugees crossed the porous border to seek relative safety in Pakistan’s cities and towns.


And more: A Taliban return to power, either through a civil war or through a peace deal that gives them a share of power, would embolden the extremist movements in Pakistan that share the same source of ideological mentorship in the thousands of religious seminaries spread across Pakistan. Those groups have shown no hesitation in antagonizing the country’s government.
While Pakistan’s military played a dangerous game of supporting militants abroad and containing extremists at home, the country’s Islamist movements found a rallying cause in the presence of an invading foreign force next door, openly fund-raising for and cheering on their Afghan classmates. New extremist groups kept shrinking the civil society space in Pakistan — often targeting intellectuals and professionals for abuse or attack — and even found sympathizers in the ranks of Pakistan’s security forces.
Pakistani generals have resorted to a mix of force and appeasement in tackling the country’s own growing militancy problem, said Dr. Ayesha Siddiqa, a research associate at the School of Oriental and African Studies in London. But a strategy for countering the spread of extremism has been elusive.
“It scares me, it scares me,” Dr. Siddiqa said. “Once the Taliban come back, that should trouble the Pakistani government, or any government. It will be inspiring for all the other groups.”
Said Nazir, a retired brigadier and defense analyst in Islamabad, said Pakistan had “learned some lessons” from the blowback of past support to jihadist groups. The country would need to tread more cautiously in the endgame of the Afghan war.
“Victory will not be claimed by Pakistan, but tacitly the Taliban will owe it to Pakistan,” Mr. Nazir said. “Pakistan does fear the replay of past events and fears a bloody civil war and violence if hasty withdrawal and no political solution occur simultaneously.”
Seth Jones of the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington said that although Pakistan’s military and intelligence establishment are “undoubtedly celebrating” the Biden announcement, greater control in Afghanistan is far from assured.
“It will be difficult, if not impossible, for Pakistan to control the Taliban and other militant groups in Afghanistan as the country spirals into a civil war,” he said. “Al Qaeda, the Islamic State, and other groups are already operating in Afghanistan. There is no way Pakistan can control this hodgepodge of groups, which have different interests, leaders, and goals.”

From the moment of its birth as a country in 1947, Pakistan found itself surrounded by enemies. The new borders drawn up by British officials instantly mired Pakistan in a host of territorial disputes, including a serious one with Afghanistan, which still lays claim to what most of the world sees as Pakistan’s northwestern regions.

It was at the peak of the Cold War in the 1970s, as the Soviet Union pushed to expand its influence in South and Central Asia, that Pakistani leaders found a formula of deploying Islamist proxies they have stuck to ever since. The United States armed and financed the training of the mujahedeen insurgency that would defeat the Soviet Army in Afghanistan and topple the government it propped up. Pakistan’s army, particularly its intelligence wing, would serve as the handler, host, and trainer.

Through the ensuing civil war in the 1990s, Pakistani generals helped a younger group of fundamentalist Afghan fighters known as the Taliban sweep the fighting factions and establish a government with control over more than 90 percent of Afghanistan.

But when the United States invaded in 2001 to chase Osama bin Laden and Al Qaeda after their terrorist attacks on American soil, the Americans also turned their sights on Pakistan’s allies in Afghanistan, the ruling Taliban. Pakistan found itself in a difficult position. In the face of President George Bush’s “with us or against us” ultimatum, Pakistan’s military ruler, Gen. Pervez Musharraf, reluctantly went along.

The decision had an immediate blowback: Pakistan began facing attacks from the Pakistani Taliban for siding with the U.S. military campaign against their ideological brothers in Afghanistan. It took years of military operations that cost the lives of thousands of Pakistani forces, and displaced countless people in Pakistan’s northwest, to quell the group.


At the same time, Pakistan’s military kept working to help the Afghan Taliban regroup as an insurgency to keep the United States in check. Even as American officials relied on Pakistani help to conduct the war and intelligence operations, some were bitter about the double role played by the I.S.I. The killing of Bin Laden in Pakistan by U.S. forces in 2011 was one rare moment when those tensions played out in public.
But Pakistan’s generals were also successful in making themselves indispensable to the United States — offering a nuclear-armed ally in a region where China, Russia and Islamist militants all had interests. Effectively, it meant that the United States chose to turn a blind eye as its Pakistani allies helped the Taliban wear down American and allied forces in Afghanistan.
Afghan government officials, meanwhile, were becoming increasingly distraught that their American allies were not coming down harder on Pakistan.
On one trip to Afghanistan soon after being elected vice president in 2008, Mr. Biden was urged by President Hamid Karzai to pressure Pakistan into rooting out Taliban sanctuaries on its soil. Mr. Biden was reported to respond by saying that Pakistan was 50 times more important to the United States than Afghanistan was.
In recent years, as American officials sought a way to leave Afghanistan, they again had to turn to Pakistan — to pressure the Taliban to come to peace talks, and to lend help when the United States needed to move against Al Qaeda or the Islamic State affiliate in the region.
With the U.S. intention to leave publicly declared, Pakistan did away with any semblance of denial that the Taliban leadership was sheltering there. Taliban leaders flew from Pakistani cities to engage in peace talks in Qatar. When negotiations reached delicate moments that required consultations with field commanders, they flew back to Pakistan.
When the United States finally signed a withdrawal agreement with the Taliban in February last year, the mood in some circles in Pakistan was one of open celebration.

Pakistan’s former defense minister, Khawaja Muhammad Asif, who had repeatedly visited the halls of power in Washington as a U.S. ally, tweeted a photo of U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo meeting Mullah Abdul Ghani Baradar, the Taliban deputy at the talks in Qatar.
“You might have might on your side, but God is with us,” Mr. Asif said in the tweet, ending with a cry of victory. “Allah u Akbar!”
But there are signs that extremist groups within Pakistan have already felt emboldened by the Taliban’s perceived victory, giving a glimpse of the trouble likely to be in store for Pakistani officials.
The once-defeated Pakistani Taliban have increased their activities in tribal areas bordering Afghanistan. Ambushes against security forces have become more frequent.
Just how wide the problem of extremism might stretch has been on display in recent days on the streets of two of Pakistan’s main cities, Lahore and Karachi.
Supporters of Tehreek-e-Labbaik Pakistan, a movement that sees itself as protecting Islam against blasphemy, thrashed uniformed members of Pakistani forces and took dozens hostage for hours. Videos emerged of Pakistani army officers trying to reason with the violent protesters. Officials said two policemen had been killed, and 300 wounded. The showdown continues, as the government moved to ban the group as a terrorist outfit.
“The state was not able to control the stick-wielding and stone-hurling members of the T.L.P. that paralyzed most parts of the country for two days,” said Afrasiab Khattak, a former chairman of Pakistan’s human rights commission. “How will they handle trained, guns-carrying Taliban militants?”

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An interesting article that has appeared in the NYT. Your takes? I do find some of the concerns genuine.
In other words I think they want to threaten Pakistan like "ab dekho me tumare saath kya karta hu". At least that's the impression I get from the last paragraphs.

Most likely they'll try to revive TTP with some minor attacks happening on security services. They probably wanted to prop up TLP as around the same time this article came out. They have been black listed.

U.S moaning and complaining about its failures. Difference between their snow flake military and PakMil is that they have the might of machines. Whenever they come across tough contact they tend to hunker down, engage in the firefight and then just calling in CAS or some other asset. Which is good. But they don't try to isolate and locate the enemy and take him out. Like Pakistani soldiers do. Also their generals were played big time by the corrupt ANA/Northern Alliance warlords and their political wing. Some U.S generals I feel were corrupt and made tons of money together with these warlords.

Hence our casualties may be higher but we got the job done. It also helps that the people were our own and we were familiar with the terrain. We did have to learn how insurgents fight in built up areas and in ambushes in open landscape. But I guess it was quite a fast learning curve.
Afrasiab Khattak, a surrendered militant, deserves a medal for these mental gymnastics and false equivalences. TLP is not the Afghan Taliban nor are Afghan Taliban Pakistan's enemy, if not our best of best friends. And the state of Pakistan can handle trained, guns-carrying militants. Afrasiab only needs to ask TTP and the "Apnay Bachay". They are still looking for their KIAs in the mountains of waziristan.
I think their next move probably was to fan the flames of TLP. Which got check mated or preempted by Establishment.
 
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FuturePAF

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i came to the thread to say the same --- ever since biden annouced the withdrawal , lobbyists are mourning...
Defense contractors are suing. Many had contracts out to next year and one had a contract out to 2026.

When the idea of pulling out was seriously discussed, under Trump, you can tell they were shocked. Just looks at the guy behind trump and his mild but telling reaction (especially the suggestion Pakistan should do the fighting :P) . Trump’s great at summing things up in his own special way.

 
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FuturePAF

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“When history is written,” declared Gen. Hamid Gul, who led the feared spy service known as the I.S.I. during the last stretch of the Cold War in the 1980s, “it will be stated that the I.S.I. defeated the Soviet Union in Afghanistan with the help of America.”
“Then there will be another sentence,” General Gul added after a brief pause, delivering his punchline to loud applause. “The I.S.I., with the help of America, defeated America.”



This famous quote goes like hot knife through butter among the enemies of Pakistan, liberal trash within and on this vary forum.

May Allah raise Gen Gul ranks in hereafter. Ameen.
Those in Afghanistan that celebrated his death, years ago, are probably regretting it now. They forgot so easily he was part of the effort that helped free them from Soviet occupation.

@Taimoor Khan can you confirm the following video’s title is accurate on what the speaker is saying.

 

Hakikat ve Hikmet

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As for the Ehl-I Dunya, Death = Defeat and Poverty = Suicide....

Even when the Ottoman Empire was going down one third of the male population embraced Shehadet....

These bastards would never understand that....
 

mingle

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Biden will impose sanctions against Pakistan after leaving Afghanistan.
that's why he did not call PM Imran Khan.
The US is repeating the same mistake of 1989.
89 they sanctioned Pakistan over nuclear program now zero chance for this you need a solid reason for sanctioning any country.
The current mood by Biden administration towards IK is he was close to Trump like MBS & MBZ Biden targeted these individuals too only due to domestic politics. Also this current disinfo campaign againt Pakistan is only for Get more concession from Talibans very simple because before Biden announcement of withdrawal there was no disinfo campaign in US news outlets US will keep diplomatic presence in Afghanistan So need Pakistan support till then not like 80s when they have zero diplomatic presence
 
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It was terrible mishandling by the traitor Musharaf that cost Pakistan Afghanistan and gave India Kabul on a platter. The establishment in Pakistan by 2005 saw the disaster and then began to try to undo it by covertly supporting Taliban. Nearly 20 years later we are about to go back to status quo ante.

Pakistan will succeed if it can adopt a nuanced approach. It MUST make sure that whatever happens inside Afghanstan does not blowback to USA or Europe. Primarily meaning not allow any groups like AQ etc who use Afgh., to launch attacks on Western targets. As long as this condition is met Pakistan will emerge the winner.

On a secondary and lower priorty it must make sure that there is no massacres carried out by Talban and or they go full on retard with females. The reason being is this could get picked by by western media or create waves of refugees which again would put spotlight on Pakistan.

As long as these are secured Pakistan will be back to late 1990s in Afghanistan.

On another note Pakistan has in PM Imran Khan the best interlocuter on Afghanistan. Lest we forget he used to be called 'Taliban Khan'. Well that to has given him stock with the Talibs. This places him nicely to have influence on them as they know his heart was with them all along.

good write up..Disagree with Musharraf though..He is the best thing to have happened to Pakistan for a long time...He gace Pakistan economy a serious boost
 

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