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Beijing-based vet, who was confirmed as China's first human infection case with Monkey B virus [monkeypox], dies: Report

Hamartia Antidote

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The vet used to works for an institution researching on non-human primates.


  • 53-year-old vet showed early-onset symptoms of nausea and vomiting a month after he dissected two dead monkeys in early March
  • Meanwhile, his family members are reportedly safe from the virus

A Beijing-based veterinarian who was confirmed as China's first human infection case with Monkey B virus (BV) has died, amid rising concerns. Meanwhile, a person infected with the monkeypox virus has been detected in Texas, US.


Global Times citing the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention reported that the 53-year-old vet showed early-onset symptoms of nausea and vomiting a month after he dissected two dead monkeys in early March. The vet sought treatment in several hospitals and eventually died on May 27, said the journal.

Meanwhile, his family members are reportedly safe from the virus.

The vet used to works for an institution researching on non-human primates.

Global Times stated, there were no fatal or even clinically evident BV infections in China before, thus the vet's case marks the first human infection case with BV identified in China.
 

beijingwalker

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Macacine alphaherpesvirus 1
was first identified in 1932 following the death of William Brebner, a young physician who was bitten by a rhesus monkey. He had healed from the bite but later developed a febrile illness, resulting in localized erythema, lymphangitis, lymphadenitis and, ultimately, transverse myelitis. Neurologic tissues obtained during autopsy revealed the presence of an ultrafilterable agent that appeared similar to HSV-1.This isolate was originally termed "W virus."

Within a year of Brebner's death, Albert Sabin identified a novel virus from the same samples,[16] which he later named B virus. Sabin further described the lethality of Macacine alphaherpesvirus 1 by showing that infectivity was independent of the route of inoculation. Additionally, it was observed that Macacine alphaherpesvirus 1 induced immunologic responses similar to HSV-1and shared similarities to HVP-2 and Langur herpesvirus, two other nonhuman primate alphaherpesviruses.

By 1959, Macacine alphaherpesvirus 1 was identified as the causative agent in 17 human cases, 12 of which resulted in death. Approximately 50 cases had been identified by 2002, although only 26 were well documented. Improvements in handling human cases have been made in the past several decades. Between 1987 and 2004, the mortality rate decreased, largely due to the addition of new forms of treatment and improved diagnosis. There have been a total of five fatalities related to Macacine alphaherpesvirus 1 in this period.
First case in China, but in the west it's been around for almost a century already, sporadically happen here and there.
China's first AID case was also brought in from the west in the early 1980's, by an American.
 

Hamartia Antidote

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HIV was first discovered in the United States, why is it not called the American virus?
No, it wasn't. Is the China rewriting history again?

We all know HIV is American virus
Wrong, stop making things up. Poor people were dying of it since the 1920's in Africa and unfortunately nobody cared or were interested in helping them.

So just like Zika when it is suddenly on your doorstep people notice otherwise they don't give a sh*t no matter how bad it is elsewhere. Maybe Ebola is an exception after it got out of control.
 
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beijingwalker

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AIDS didn't become an issue until 1983 in the US. It was diagnosed in 1981.
The first recorded death due to AIDS was a male Argentine-American tourist and California resident who died in Beijing on 6 June 1985.

Through the early 1980s, multiple American pharmaceutical firms exported medical blood products contaminated with HIV to East Asia. Bayer Corporation exported plasma knowing the risks of HIV transmission, resulting in over one hundred infections in Taiwan and Hong Kong.

Factorate, a Factor VIII product of Armour Pharmaceuticals Company, was imported to China and used in blood transfusions in 19 people in Zhejiang province between 1983 and 1985. Four of the recipients, all hemophiliacs, were infected with HIV, making them at the time the first identified cases of native Chinese infected within the country's borders.
 

Hamartia Antidote

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Through the early 1980s, multiple American pharmaceutical firms exported medical blood products contaminated with HIV to East Asia. Bayer Corporation exported plasma knowing the risks of HIV transmission, resulting in over one hundred infections in Taiwan and Hong Kong.

Factorate, a Factor VIII product of Armour Pharmaceuticals Company, was imported to China and used in blood transfusions in 19 people in Zhejiang province between 1983 and 1985. Four of the recipients, all hemophiliacs, were infected with HIV, making them at the time the first identified cases of native Chinese infected within the country's borders.
Well you are lucky you weren't importing blood from Africa. I guess you trust the white man's blood even if it is more expensive. Maybe you switched later after HIV and now you got Covid from there.
Over 200 persons are being monitored across 27 States for possible exposure already.
Yes, I saw the post in the Americas forum earlier.
 
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