What's new

Bangladesh’s new curriculum wins praises. Are teachers ready for the challenge?

Homo Sapiens

ELITE MEMBER
Feb 3, 2015
8,655
-3
20,300
Country
Bangladesh
Location
Bangladesh
Bangladesh’s new curriculum wins praises. Are teachers ready for the challenge?
Kazi Nafia Rahman, Staff Correspondent, bdnews24.com
Published: 22 Sep 2021 11:40 PM BdST Updated: 23 Sep 2021 12:06 AM BdST

  • The new system aims to wean students off rote learning and focuses on class activities -- a way to deepen the understanding of subjects. Photo: Asif Mahmud Ove

    The new system aims to wean students off rote learning and focuses on class activities -- a way to deepen the understanding of subjects. Photo: Asif Mahmud O
Educators have welcomed the curriculum planned by the government, but they see challenges in its implementation and doubt how much Bangladesh is ready for the new system.

The rollout of the new curriculum will begin in 2022 and by 2025 students will experience a new world of schooling without exams up to Class III, Education Minister Dipu Moni said earlier this month.

The government has added more classwork assessments with no distinctions in the streams of science, arts and business studies in classes IX and X.

In line with the outline of the new national curriculum, students will be assessed in classes and have a comprehensive evaluation.

“Learning will be fun. The burden of subjects and textbooks will be less,” Dipu Moni said.

The new system aims to wean students off rote learning and focuses on class activities -- a way to deepen the understanding of subjects.

Experts say the changes are much needed for a more effective and reality-based education system, but the government needed more review before bringing big changes.

REDUCING EXAMS?
Professor Serajul Islam Choudhury welcomed the scrapping of exams, saying the move will reduce pressure on students and costs.
“It is wrong to make the students focus on tests, guidebooks and private coaching in the name of public exams.”

Father Hemanta Peus Rosario, principal of Notre Dame College in Dhaka, says learning with reduced exams will be fun for the children.
In his words, Primary Education Completion or PEC exams for Class V and Junior School Certificate or JSC tests for Class VIII “hampered” study. “These exams gave rise to private coaching. Little children had to take big exams. Without these exams, a lot of time can be saved and be used in the classroom.”

“The children grow up in unhealthy competition to become first, second or third. This will go away now, but they will be evaluated,” said Shahan Ara Begum, principal of Motijheel Ideal School and College.
Mariam Begum, a professor of Dhaka University’s Institute of Education and Research, also sees the scrapping of exams for up to Class III as a good decision, but she thinks the abolishment of the JSC exams will affect the career of many students in rural areas. “Many cannot continue their studies after Class VIII. They would have been able to get a job with the JSC certificate.”

SCRAPPING STREAMS
Father Hemanta said the blurring of the streams for Class IX and X is a good side to the new system, but making the syllabus is still a challenge, especially for grades XI and XII, because they get only one and a half years to complete college education before Higher Secondary Certificate exams.

He believes the time is not enough for the HSC students of science streams if they do not have a strong basic knowledge of science.
“All other countries have four years for higher secondary education, but it’s only two years in our country. The government should think about it.”
Prof Mariam said the “gaps” students suffer during the transition to higher education may widen due to “a lack of subjects in grades IX and X”.

Principal Shahan Ara supported the move to eliminate the streams, saying it will reduce pressure on the students. “We force the children to study science and become doctors considering it as an issue of prestige. But this is decreasing their knowledge of the real world, social sciences, geography.”
“When they achieve poor grades in SSC, they choose the commerce stream, or switch to arts from commerce. Now after studying in Class IX and X, the students will themselves understand which path they should take.”

WHY CHANGES?
Prof Serajul thinks the government should have made it clear that it had been “experimenting” with the education system. He also believes the changes should have been based on public opinion rather than through a bureaucratic channel.
He questioned the decision to launch PEC and JSC tests, and then scrapping them.
“Now we haven’t received an explanation why the exams are scrapped. This is public education. So, the people should know the reasons behind holding extra exams, and why these are scrapped now.”

“Was the previous exam policy wrong? Such experiments with education are not right.”
CHALLENGES
Prof Mariam sees challenges in executing the curriculum. “We are changing the curriculum and the evaluation system. Are schools and teachers ready for the new challenges?”

Principal Shahan Ara is also doubtful about the implementation of the plan. She said the creative learning system, launched around a decade ago, has not actually been useful. “Many teachers in the rural areas do not even understand the system.”
“The execution of the changes will be the biggest challenge at a time when we could not implement the previous curriculum in so many years. It will be unrealistic if we think that we will be able to actualise bigger changes in teaching and learning easily now,” said Prof Mariam.

She thinks it would have been easier for the teachers and students to adapt to the new system if the changes were brought in phases.

 

DalalErMaNodi

BANNED
May 12, 2020
5,296
6
8,718
Country
Bangladesh
Location
Kuwait
Good... Education is the most important aspect of national development.


India may be terrible they're well educated considering their neighbours..


We should naturally try and not only match that but over take that.
 

PoondolotoPandalum

FULL MEMBER
Jun 24, 2021
107
-1
275
Country
Bangladesh
Location
United Kingdom
There were talks about introducing programming and coding very early on to the national curriculum. The idea is that young children can learn these concepts very easily at a young age, and this has been successfully demonstrated in many countries (forgot which ones). It'll prepare the next generation to be better equipped for the jobs in the future, a lot of which will be tech-based.

It was probably the best idea to emerge from "Digital Bangladesh". Not sure if they'll go ahead with it. For that to happen, you'll need a very large number of teachers capable of teaching these things. Which would be very difficult.

Imagine some village school in Habiganj teaching C++, instead of what Kazi Nazrul Islam liked to wear on a Sunday evening
 

Michael Corleone

ELITE MEMBER
Oct 27, 2014
10,245
-5
10,604
Country
Bangladesh
Location
Ukraine
Good... Education is the most important aspect of national development.


India may be terrible they're well educated considering their neighbours..


We should naturally try and not only match that but over take that.
Copy pasta CBSE and ICSE curriculum. Offer both. You get best of both worlds. Educated wage slaves and educated leading experts
There were talks about introducing programming and coding very early on to the national curriculum. The idea is that young children can learn these concepts very easily at a young age, and this has been successfully demonstrated in many countries (forgot which ones). It'll prepare the next generation to be better equipped for the jobs in the future, a lot of which will be tech-based.

It was probably the best idea to emerge from "Digital Bangladesh". Not sure if they'll go ahead with it. For that to happen, you'll need a very large number of teachers capable of teaching these things. Which would be very difficult.

Imagine some village school in Habiganj teaching C++, instead of what Kazi Nazrul Islam liked to wear on a Sunday evening
Kazi and togore will never go away. But it’s better to keep them in bangla subject which should be thought just like English.
 

Bilal9

ELITE MEMBER
Feb 4, 2014
18,295
1
28,951
Country
Bangladesh
Location
United States
There were talks about introducing programming and coding very early on to the national curriculum. The idea is that young children can learn these concepts very easily at a young age, and this has been successfully demonstrated in many countries (forgot which ones). It'll prepare the next generation to be better equipped for the jobs in the future, a lot of which will be tech-based.

It was probably the best idea to emerge from "Digital Bangladesh". Not sure if they'll go ahead with it. For that to happen, you'll need a very large number of teachers capable of teaching these things. Which would be very difficult.

Imagine some village school in Habiganj teaching C++, instead of what Kazi Nazrul Islam liked to wear on a Sunday evening
Yup agree 100%. Focus should be on English language and computer stuff like programming as skills. Teaching programming is not tough if you can "train the trainers first" who can be employed by Bangladesh computer council and go on rotating tours around the country. And we don't have to import anything. Walton makes all laptops, tablets and accessories and there are others too. If Govt. gives these laptop makers large contracts then they benefit as well. Walton is already supplying OEM markets around the world.
 

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Total: 1, Members: 0, Guests: 1)


Top Bottom