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Bangladesh: Witness to a silent fish revolution

fallstuff

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Bangladesh: Witness to a silent fish revolution
Just released official statistics show, Bangladesh’s yearly fish output increased to 4.4 million tons now from 1.8 million tons in 2000.

With over 1.2 million tons of annual capture, Bangladesh now contributes a tenth of the world’s total inland fish production

Bangladesh’s annual fish production has increased nearly two and a half times over the past two decades, helping the country keep fish prices low and increase protein consumption.

Just released official statistics show, Bangladesh’s yearly fish output increased to 4.4 million tons now from 1.8 million tons in 2000. The country’s Ilish catch rose to over half a million tons a year now while it was only 0.3 million tons 10 years back.



With over 1.2 million tons of annual capture, Bangladesh now contributes a tenth of the world’s total inland fish production

Bangladesh’s annual fish production has increased nearly two and a half times over the past two decades, helping the country keep fish prices low and increase protein consumption.

Just released official statistics show, Bangladesh’s yearly fish output increased to 4.4 million tons now from 1.8 million tons in 2000. The country’s Ilish catch rose to over half a million tons a year now while it was only 0.3 million tons 10 years back.


Bangladesh ranks first in global catch of Ilish, fourth in Tilapia.

With over 1.2 million tons of inland water capture fish output annually, Bangladesh now contributes a tenth of the world’s total inland water capture fish production, the United Nations Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) states in its latest flagship report – The State of World Fisheries and Aquaculture 2020.

China (1.9 million tons) and India (1.7 million tons) are the only two other countries in the world that produce more inland water capture fish than Bangladesh.

“A rapid increase in aquaculture production in Bangladesh has lowered fish prices, increased protein consumption, and reduced poverty,” states “The Making of a Blue Revolution in Bangladesh” – an International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) publication that offers a valuable case study of how this transformation in the fish value chain has occurred and how it has improved the lives of both fish producers and fish consumers in Bangladesh.



n recent years, fish researchers and scientists in Bangladesh also succeeded in establishing a gene bank for protecting local fish species and regaining breeding of at least 24 out of 64 near-extinct homegrown fish species. These efforts helped Bangladesh Fisheries Research Institute (BFRI) bag the country’s second highest civilian award Ekushey Padak in 2020.

Bangladesh’s tremendous success in fish production growth has transformed its population’s otherwise low-protein diet to a diversified and rich sustenance. Bangladesh today belongs to a small league of countries that provide over half of food proteins from fish sources.

Globally, fish provides only 17% of average per capita intake of animal proteins, but only a handful of countries such as Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Cambodia, Indonesia, the Gambia, Ghana, Sierra Leone, and several small island developing states (SIDS) source over 50% of animal proteins from fish. In Bangladesh’s case it is 60%, making fish one of the cheapest sources of protein for 170 million people in the country.

“Fish production in Bangladesh has transformed over the past 20 years. Fish is the biggest protein source in Bangladeshi diets,” said IFPRI South Asia Director Shahidur Rashid, and the Washington-based food policy think tank’s Senior Research Fellow Xiaobo Zhang.

Xiaobo Zhang, also a Peking University economics professor, together with Rashid, edited the book – The Making of a Blue Revolution in Bangladesh.

Through the 1980s and 1990s, high prices for fish contributed to poor nutrition in the country but as fish farming—known as aquaculture—more than doubled between 2000 and 2010, prices fell, per capita annual fish consumption rose countrywide, and the expansion of pond fisheries generated more employment, they noted.

“Improved infrastructure and information access lead to lower transaction costs. Roads, rural electrification, and telecommunications access have all dramatically improved in Bangladesh………. Fish trade and marketing costs have declined accordingly. Fish value chains now involve fewer actors per unit of output. While the number of traders has increased, the increase in fish production has been much greater,” they explained.

 

Michael Corleone

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Better fish than mashed foods. People going crazy with mashed food trend. Potatoes and some other generics are fine but who mashes chicken? Idiots
its not dangrous for nature ???????
Hillsha can’t be farmed. It lived in deep waters. And there are ponds everywhere in bd. New canals are made to replace the old canals which were filled and populated with fish so no harm
 

mb444

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Great news. When its comes to agribusiness we can excel.... our country is blessed with the best land and abundance of water. Long may the trend continue. We have reached self sufficiency, it is now time to export more.
 

Type59

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its not dangrous for nature ???????
I believe their fish farming so more sustainable. Catching wild fish is unsustainable.

Importantly Pakistan should sustainably fish our waters and stop foreign trawlers poaching our fish. Look at Somalia, foreign trawlers stripped their oceans clean thus leading to fishermen turning to piracy.
 

Bilal9

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I believe their fish farming so more sustainable. Catching wild fish is unsustainable.

Importantly Pakistan should sustainably fish our waters and stop foreign trawlers poaching our fish. Look at Somalia, foreign trawlers stripped their oceans clean thus leading to fishermen turning to piracy.
Your new Coast Guard ships will stop the fish poaching I hope...

Here is a recent industry report...

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Bangladesh Fisheries Sector: Growth Prospects and Opportunities



Bangladesh’s agricultural sector contributes 14.2% of GDP, [1] employing 47% of the working population [2], with 17 million people (1.4 million women) depending on fisheries sector for their livelihoods through fishing, farming, fish handling, and processing. Agricultural sector has experienced significant growth over the last couple of decades, with the fisheries sector following suit. According to the data from the Yearbook of Fisheries Statistics (2015-16), the current CAGR for the fisheries sector is 5.28% over the last 10 years. According to industry estimates, fish production will reach 5.02 million metric tonne within 2020-21.



Despite shrinking water bodies for fish cultivation, sustained growth has been possible due to the use of better inputs and modern technology contributing to higher yield. Although the country has gained self-sufficiency in terms of agricultural production, the population is growing and will reach 185 million by 2030. [3] To this end, there needs to be further increase in productivity to account for the growing population. Currently (2015-16) there are 14.7 million fish farmers in the country and 902 fish hatcheries (of which 136 are government owned and 813 are from the private sector). These hatcheries produce 618 Thousand Kg of juvenile fish.

The inland (closed and open) fisheries and marine fisheries had a production volume of 4.13 million metric ton in 2016-17. Additionally, the ongoing seventh Five-year Plan (from 2016-2020) of the government targets an increase of 45% from the baseline (FY2012-13) volume of 1.7 million metric ton cultured fish production. This will entail increased feed, medicine and equipment demand for the increased volume of fish.

Using advanced production methods and commercial feed, fish production has increased over the years. With an increasing demand for fish protein and a decline in capture fisheries production, aquaculture is shifting towards intensification. This is reflected by the negative growth rate (seen in table 1) of extensive fish production method. As the industry is shifting from extensive to intensive production method, there will be more prevalence of disease requiring medicines and chemicals for supporting intensive fish farming methods. As a result, the need for advisory services in aquaculture and fish feed would markedly increase in the upcoming decade.

Production MethodsProduction RangeNumber of PondAreaProductionGrowth rate (%)
Ha%MT%
1.Extensive<1.5MT/Ha401,38445,24612.1559,8333.71-23.04
2.Semi Intensive1.5-4MT/Ha1,325,670230,75361.96765,38347.446.68
3.Intensive4>10MT/Ha389,02284,87822.79503,13131.196.60
4.Improved Intensive10 >MT/Ha51,02711,5213.09284,89317.6610.01
Total2,167,103372,397100.01,613,240100.05.71
TABLE 1: Bangladesh: Cultural Method wise fish production in Bangladesh

SOURCE: Yearbook Of Fisheries Statistics (2015-16)

Export Market
The fisheries sector in Bangladesh has been earning a notable amount of foreign exchange. In 2013-14, the country earned BDT 4,776.92 core by exporting 77.33 thousand MT of fish and fisheries products. This is the highest export earnings in the last 10 years, starting from 2017. In FY 2016-17, the sector earned BDT 4,287.64 crore by exporting almost 68.31 thousand MT of fish and fisheries products.

Shrimp is one of the major export items in Bangladesh. Total shrimp and prawn production including capture has increased from 1,60,000 MT in 2002-03 to 2,46,000 MT in 2016-17. The growing export can be attributed to the sector’s steps in ensuring HACCP procedure and traceability regulation according to the requirement of European Union (EU) and USA. The EU and USA accounts for 80% of the total shrimp export in 2015. Other shrimp export destinations include Belgium, UK, Netherlands, Germany, USA, China, France, Russian Federation, Japan and Saudi Arabia.

FIGURE 3: Export of Fish and Fish Product 2016-17 / SOURCE: EPB (Export Promotion Bureau) and FIQC (Fish Inspection and Quality Control), Department of Fisheries, Yearbook of Fisheries Statistics of Bangladesh 2016-17

The current volume of the annual fish feed market is around 7,00,000-8,00,000 lakh MT, while semi-industrial feed manufactured using simple mixing machine by local feed manufacturers, constitutes an estimated 5-6 Lakh MT of feed per month. The demand for fish feed (both sinking and floating) is projected to have a CAGR of 5-7% (Source: LightCastle Primary Research).

As a riverine country, Bangladesh has a long history of producing and consuming fish, mainly sourced from the rivers. Over the last couple of decades, many of these rivers have dried up, and coupled with growing population, consumption of cultured fish has been on the rise. As the country becomes more prosperous, protein intake from fishbased diet would get more precedence, mainly due to the perceived health benefits. Hence, the sustainable growth of the sector is of paramount importance for the economy.

Dipa Sultana, Junior Associate at LightCastle Partners, has prepared the write-up. For further clarifications, contact here: info@lightcastlebd.com.

References
  • 1. The World Factbook by Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), 2018
  • 2. World Bank Database, 2017
  • 3. Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics Population Projection
 

nahtanbob

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Sep 24, 2018
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Bangladesh: Witness to a silent fish revolution
Just released official statistics show, Bangladesh’s yearly fish output increased to 4.4 million tons now from 1.8 million tons in 2000.

With over 1.2 million tons of annual capture, Bangladesh now contributes a tenth of the world’s total inland fish production

Bangladesh’s annual fish production has increased nearly two and a half times over the past two decades, helping the country keep fish prices low and increase protein consumption.

Just released official statistics show, Bangladesh’s yearly fish output increased to 4.4 million tons now from 1.8 million tons in 2000. The country’s Ilish catch rose to over half a million tons a year now while it was only 0.3 million tons 10 years back.



With over 1.2 million tons of annual capture, Bangladesh now contributes a tenth of the world’s total inland fish production

Bangladesh’s annual fish production has increased nearly two and a half times over the past two decades, helping the country keep fish prices low and increase protein consumption.

Just released official statistics show, Bangladesh’s yearly fish output increased to 4.4 million tons now from 1.8 million tons in 2000. The country’s Ilish catch rose to over half a million tons a year now while it was only 0.3 million tons 10 years back.


Bangladesh ranks first in global catch of Ilish, fourth in Tilapia.

With over 1.2 million tons of inland water capture fish output annually, Bangladesh now contributes a tenth of the world’s total inland water capture fish production, the United Nations Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) states in its latest flagship report – The State of World Fisheries and Aquaculture 2020.

China (1.9 million tons) and India (1.7 million tons) are the only two other countries in the world that produce more inland water capture fish than Bangladesh.

“A rapid increase in aquaculture production in Bangladesh has lowered fish prices, increased protein consumption, and reduced poverty,” states “The Making of a Blue Revolution in Bangladesh” – an International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) publication that offers a valuable case study of how this transformation in the fish value chain has occurred and how it has improved the lives of both fish producers and fish consumers in Bangladesh.



n recent years, fish researchers and scientists in Bangladesh also succeeded in establishing a gene bank for protecting local fish species and regaining breeding of at least 24 out of 64 near-extinct homegrown fish species. These efforts helped Bangladesh Fisheries Research Institute (BFRI) bag the country’s second highest civilian award Ekushey Padak in 2020.

Bangladesh’s tremendous success in fish production growth has transformed its population’s otherwise low-protein diet to a diversified and rich sustenance. Bangladesh today belongs to a small league of countries that provide over half of food proteins from fish sources.

Globally, fish provides only 17% of average per capita intake of animal proteins, but only a handful of countries such as Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Cambodia, Indonesia, the Gambia, Ghana, Sierra Leone, and several small island developing states (SIDS) source over 50% of animal proteins from fish. In Bangladesh’s case it is 60%, making fish one of the cheapest sources of protein for 170 million people in the country.

“Fish production in Bangladesh has transformed over the past 20 years. Fish is the biggest protein source in Bangladeshi diets,” said IFPRI South Asia Director Shahidur Rashid, and the Washington-based food policy think tank’s Senior Research Fellow Xiaobo Zhang.

Xiaobo Zhang, also a Peking University economics professor, together with Rashid, edited the book – The Making of a Blue Revolution in Bangladesh.

Through the 1980s and 1990s, high prices for fish contributed to poor nutrition in the country but as fish farming—known as aquaculture—more than doubled between 2000 and 2010, prices fell, per capita annual fish consumption rose countrywide, and the expansion of pond fisheries generated more employment, they noted.

“Improved infrastructure and information access lead to lower transaction costs. Roads, rural electrification, and telecommunications access have all dramatically improved in Bangladesh………. Fish trade and marketing costs have declined accordingly. Fish value chains now involve fewer actors per unit of output. While the number of traders has increased, the increase in fish production has been much greater,” they explained.

i assume this is fish that lives in fresh water
 

Tom-tom

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I think it is mostly freshwater fish. The water is abound from March to October from the rainy season and the major rivers entering from India.

Don't you mean from October to march?

Oct, Nov, Dec, Jan, Feb march.
 

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