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Bangladesh most gender-equal country in South Asia for 8th time

AmiEktaKharapChele

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Despite being the best performer in the region, Bangladesh has fallen six notches to rank 71st among 146 economies


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Bangladesh has been named as the most gender-equal country in South Asia for the eighth consecutive year in the Global Gender Gap Report 2022.



The report of the World Economic Forum, released on Wednesday, said the country is the only one to have closed more than 70% of the gender gap among others in the region.

Despite being the best performer in the region, Bangladesh has fallen six notches to rank 71st among 146 economies surveyed in the 2022 index, which benchmarks countries based on how close they are to reaching gender equality.

The 16th edition of the report reveals that Bangladesh's overall gender gap widened by 0.5 percentage points to 71.4% in 2022. As a result, its global position has deteriorated.


With 71.9% of the gender gap closed, Bangladesh was in the 65th position among 156 countries covered in the 2021 index.

However, Bangladesh has managed to stay ahead of all South Asian nations since 2014 by surpassing Sri Lanka that year.



"Bangladesh is comparatively doing well in gender parity. It has been outperforming other South Asian countries for a long time," said Fahmida Khatun, executive director of the Centre for Policy Dialogue, one of the partner organisations of the Centre for the New Economy and Society of the World Economic Forum.

"If we look at Bangladesh's performance in the major indices, we'll notice that the performance is satisfactory," she told The Business Standard.


Fahmida Khatun blamed Covid-19 for the low performance of Bangladesh in the case of educational attainment, one of the four key dimensions of the index.


According to the report, this year's positions of South Asian countries in the regional ranking remained the same as that of 2021.

Nepal has the second-highest level of gender parity, currently standing at 69.2%. It has been ranked 96th.


Sri Lanka is the third-best performer in the region, with 67% of its gender gap closed. It has been placed at the 110th position on the index. It is followed by the Maldives at the 117th position and Bhutan at the 126th position.

India's position on the index is 135th, third from the bottom in the region.

Afghanistan has been named as the least gender-equal country in the world and so in South Asia, with the gender gap closed by 43.5%. Pakistan stands 145th globally, being the second-worst performer in the region.

Although no country has yet achieved full gender parity, the top 10 economies have closed at least 80% of their gender gaps.

Iceland is the most gender-equal country in the world for the 13th time and the only one to have closed more than 90% of the gender gap, the report reads.

Other Scandinavian countries, Finland (86%, 2nd), Norway (84.5%, 3rd) and Sweden (82.2%, 5th), and New Zealand (84.1%, 4th) were featured in the top five.

The index benchmarks the current state and evolution of gender parity across four key dimensions – economic participation and opportunity, educational attainment, health and survival, and political empowerment.

Bangladesh's performance on 4 key dimensions

The report highlights that Bangladesh's declining performance can be attributed to slightly lower performance on educational attainment (123rd), a subindex with high concentration of scores near parity.

"A small drop in the gender gap score for literacy and the absence of recent data in primary education overshadow a slim increase of gender parity in tertiary education."

Bangladesh registered no changes on political empowerment (9th) and health and survival (129th) indexes.

On economic participation and opportunity, the report said there was a reduction in both men and women's workforce participation by 3.6 and 5.45 percentage points, respectively. However, the proportional impact was higher for women.

"The negative impact of this shortfall was nonetheless counteracted by a 5.3 percentage point increase in the share of women who are professional and technical workers, as well as a 13% increase in women's estimated earned income (compared to men's 11% increase), that raised parity outcomes overall."

South Asia has the largest gender gap of all regions

South Asia (62.3%) has the largest gender gap among the eight regions covered in the report, with low scores across all measured gender gaps and little progress made in most countries since the last edition.

At its current pace, it is now expected to take 197 years to close the gender gap in the region.

The Middle East and North Africa (63.4%) has the second-largest gender gap yet to close, followed by Sub-Saharan Africa (68.7%), East Asia and the Pacific (69%), and Central Asia (69.1%).

Meanwhile, North America is the best performing region, with 76.9% of its gender gap closed. It is followed by Europe (76.6%), Latin America and the Caribbean (72.6%).




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migflug

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Bangladesh has done incredibly well in women empowerment. While women in India in high tech and service sector are in good proportion, but we lag significantly in labor intensive jobs.
 

Bilal9

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@AmiEktaKharapChele, though I reject the Capitalism-promoting World Economic Forum and promote the more justice-seeking alternative World Social Forum I will accept that Bangladesh is a good example of female social participation among lot of countries, not just in South Asia.

@Bilal9 @Nergal

Yes. One thing I will say about this is society's attitude toward the eligibility of women as equals. In that respect - generally people of our region (including the state of "Bangla" across the border) hold women in very high regard. Hindu/Muslim doesn't matter. Some regions of the subcontinent have issues in this area.

This is one reason why our country has had PM's and leaders of the opposition as women for a long time and "Bangla" CM also was a woman. Gender equality has been a hallmark of our society which we strove for and cultivated for a while.

Bangladesh has had more girls than boys in primary and secondary grades for at least four decades now. Educated mothers make for well-balanced healthy children and can earn more money to bring up better educated offspring. Educating women will bring around dramatic societal development in one generation instead of three.

The NGO microloans helped literally millions of village women to start small businesses and become self-dependent. This was nothing short of a revolution.

There are some garment workers in Bangladesh who have gone on to earn masters and Ph.Ds in local and US universities - when their parents were landless farmers. I have read about plenty of such examples.

Bangladesh has done incredibly well in women empowerment. While women in India in high tech and service sector are in good proportion, but we lag significantly in labor intensive jobs.

I am a bit perplexed why Micro-loans (as popularized by Grameen Bank and Dr. Yunus) never took off in India. I believe there were some successes in the South.

 

jamahir

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Yes. One thing I will say about this is society's attitude toward the eligibility of women as equals. In that respect - generally people of our region (including the state of "Bangla" across the border) hold women in very high regard. Hindu/Muslim doesn't matter. Some regions of the subcontinent have issues in this area.

This is one reason why our country has had PM's and leaders of the opposition as women for a long time and "Bangla" CM also was a woman. Gender equality has been a hallmark of our society which we strove for and cultivated for a while.

Bangladesh has had more girls than boys in primary and secondary grades for at least four decades now. Educated mothers make for well-balanced healthy children and can earn more money to bring up better educated offspring. Educating women will bring around dramatic societal development in one generation instead of three.

Yes, it's a good situation there in Bangladesh, not as good as in Socialist / Communist countries like Libyan Jamahiriya, Cuba or USSR but really good for other type of countries. :)

As you said, the BD society has cultivated this progressive situation regards females perhaps through a combination of this : Buddhism, progressive interpretation of Islam, progressiveness in Hindu Bengali society, Communism including the country's official name being People's Republic of Bangladesh. The intellectuality in Bangladesh and in West Bengal is absent from ordinary Indian and Pakistani society.

The NGO microloans helped literally millions of village women to start small businesses and become self-dependent. This was nothing short of a revolution.

There are some garment workers in Bangladesh who have gone on to earn masters and Ph.Ds in local and US universities - when their parents were landless farmers. I have read about plenty of such examples.

I am a bit perplexed why Micro-loans (as popularized by Grameen Bank and Dr. Yunus) never took off in India. I believe there were some successes in the South.


1. Well, Muhammad Yunus has been accused of propagating Western Capitalist monies in guise of microloans :
But Ms. Hasina has accused Mr. Yunus of “sucking blood” from the poor.

2. In India microfinance is quite popular but among the the Capitalists who make big money out of the miseries of the poor indebted especially farmers who get into a spiral of high-interest loans with no other source of income and then come crop failures which prevent the debtor from repayment but the interest clock ticks on relentlessly. And there compounding this are the regular Indian things like marriage spendings or regular religious pilgrimages or spendings on healthcare and education and housing because these are not freely provided by the Indian system ( @Sharma Ji, take note, again ) so the farmer or the peasant ends up suiciding. I have actually wrote about this to you last year here. And microfinance is never going to get a peasant turning into an Ambani. :)
 
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BananaRepublicUK

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Yes. One thing I will say about this is society's attitude toward the eligibility of women as equals. In that respect - generally people of our region (including the state of "Bangla" across the border) hold women in very high regard. Hindu/Muslim doesn't matter. Some regions of the subcontinent have issues in this area.

This is one reason why our country has had PM's and leaders of the opposition as women for a long time and "Bangla" CM also was a woman. Gender equality has been a hallmark of our society which we strove for and cultivated for a while.

Bangladesh has had more girls than boys in primary and secondary grades for at least four decades now. Educated mothers make for well-balanced healthy children and can earn more money to bring up better educated offspring. Educating women will bring around dramatic societal development in one generation instead of three.

The NGO microloans helped literally millions of village women to start small businesses and become self-dependent. This was nothing short of a revolution.

There are some garment workers in Bangladesh who have gone on to earn masters and Ph.Ds in local and US universities - when their parents were landless farmers. I have read about plenty of such examples.



I am a bit perplexed why Micro-loans (as popularized by Grameen Bank and Dr. Yunus) never took off in India. I believe there were some successes in the South.


Why didn’t micro loans take off in India?

Because the Hindu banyas just wouldn’t let it succeed. It’s their caste given right to exploit the Dalits.

Money lending is a big part of their business and they do not want ethical competitors.

Even in BD they dominate the black market for money lending. Which rope in desperate people.
 

BananaRepublicUK

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India isn't a commie paradise so if you don't read what I posted above and linked to a previous post you are going to miss the answer to your question.

Given India’s addiction to subsidies and handouts - it is a commie paradise.

It’s communism for the banyas and Brahmins.

And “free market” for the Dalits and Muslims.
 

jamahir

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Given India’s addiction to subsidies and handouts - it is a commie paradise.

It’s communism for the banyas and Brahmins.

And “free market” for the Dalits and Muslims.

What subsidies ? What "handouts" in india ? Does Cuba use "handout" for its free education ? Did Libyan Jamahiriya use that word for its free housing and healthcare ? What's wrong with the system giving basic goods and services without exchange of money ? In fact this is how it should everywhere.

And let us not defile Communism by associating it with baniyas and Brahmanvadis / Manuvadis. And not every Indian Muslim is rational since the mid-2000s.

About "handouts" in India reality is this :
 

itsanufy

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Yes. One thing I will say about this is society's attitude toward the eligibility of women as equals. In that respect - generally people of our region (including the state of "Bangla" across the border) hold women in very high regard. Hindu/Muslim doesn't matter. Some regions of the subcontinent have issues in this area.

This is one reason why our country has had PM's and leaders of the opposition as women for a long time and "Bangla" CM also was a woman. Gender equality has been a hallmark of our society which we strove for and cultivated for a while.

Bangladesh has had more girls than boys in primary and secondary grades for at least four decades now. Educated mothers make for well-balanced healthy children and can earn more money to bring up better educated offspring. Educating women will bring around dramatic societal development in one generation instead of three.

The NGO microloans helped literally millions of village women to start small businesses and become self-dependent. This was nothing short of a revolution.

There are some garment workers in Bangladesh who have gone on to earn masters and Ph.Ds in local and US universities - when their parents were landless farmers. I have read about plenty of such examples.



I am a bit perplexed why Micro-loans (as popularized by Grameen Bank and Dr. Yunus) never took off in India. I believe there were some successes in the South.

Who told its not there?

Bandhan bank started as Bandhan Financial Services Limited.
It was because of the Microfinance tags it got approval from RBI as a full fledged bank beating proposals of TATA, Adano, Aditya Birla among others.

Problem with Microfinance is they charge interest rate of more than 25% PA.
 

KAL-EL

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Would like to get a Bangladeshi credit card to diversify my portfolio even more.

I doubt as an American that I would be eligible tho
 

jamahir

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View attachment 868644

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communism communism communism communism gadha pee gadha pee gadha pee jamahira jamahirya free free free

here's a photo for you, gadha pee ka inta shauk hai, to yeh lo ek photu !

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anyway, ladki ke saath to tera impossible sa lag ra but koi ni, apni drinking virginity to lose kar hi sakta hai.. try this:

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^might be a bit on the pricey side for you so try some McDowell no1 type.. pauwa lele, thanday paani me mila and pee jaa.. 150 - 200 rupees ki range me mil jayega

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:cheers:

You are a parasite to humanity, you know that ? You sociopath, did you see that a member left a Sad react to my post while you made fun of that post ?

Take your dog-loving sukdi "girl" friends and go away to Antarctica.

Who told its not there?

Bandhan bank started as Bandhan Financial Services Limited.
It was because of the Microfinance tags it got approval from RBI as a full fledged bank beating proposals of TATA, Adano, Aditya Birla among others.

Problem with Microfinance is they charge interest rate of more than 25% PA.

What's your point ? And if you had read my post# 5 I have linked to an older post of mine where is mentioned the notorious SKS Microfinance.
 
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