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Bangladesh is getting closer to Eurofighter Typhoon

Jobless Jack

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BD's real headache will come if the Chinese J-35 comes into service towards the latter part of this decade and the MAF gets a chance to even buy a small number like 12 of these planes.

Anyway that is theoretical and into the far future for now and I am sure that a wealtheir BD of the 2030s will be able to respond with an appropriate fighter like TFX(I am not really a fan of KFX due to too much US and European content) and US influence over Korea.
In the future the Headache of BAF is IAF. Not burma.

Once awami league is gone, bd will get more closer into chinese orbit the result will be cooling tension with burma, but increasing tension with india.

EFT is the first step. Next logical steps are to replace the F7 with j10, get strike drones and form multi layered SAM network. If BAF works hard. All these can be done in 10 years
 

Avicenna

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All of the above is circumstantial evidence at best. Any sources for point 2?

There has been

1) No indication of any trials or tenders for a advanced twin engined fighter
2) No indication from Eurofighter or in fact any other western producer of any interest in a purchase
3) No aviation news reports mentioning this

Leonardo setting up shop could be for a host of reasons, they set up shop in Pak too
Look! It's all official looking with a gov.uk and all!


Third Bangladesh-UK Strategic Dialogue: overview
Both sides highlighted the deep historic ties between Bangladesh and the United Kingdom and reaffirmed an enduring relationship based on shared values and common goals.
From:British High Commission DhakaPublished:5 May 2019

Third Bangladesh-UK Strategic Dialogue in Dhaka.

Third Bangladesh-UK Strategic Dialogue in Dhaka.
The Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the People’s Republic of Bangladesh and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) of the United Kingdom, led respectively by Bangladesh Foreign Secretary Md. Shahidul Haque and FCO Permanent Under-Secretary Sir Simon McDonald, convened the third Bangladesh-UK Strategic Dialogue on 24 April 2019, in Dhaka.
The Strategic Dialogue involved a productive exchange of views across the entire gamut of bilateral relations between Bangladesh and the United Kingdom, covering political relations, economic and development partnership, security and defence co-operation, and exchanges on current global issues.
Overview of bilateral relations
  1. Bangladesh and the UK recalled their historic relations and reiterated satisfaction at the strong and growing bilateral relations between the two friendly countries. Bangladesh recognised the UK’s moral and political support during its 1971 War of Liberation and the momentous meeting between Father of the Nation of Bangladesh Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman and British Prime Minister Sir Edward Heath on 8 January 1972. Each country underscored the importance of exchange of visits and interactions at the highest political level and looked forward to further deepening and broadening bilateral relations.
  2. Both countries noted that the year 2021 will mark the 50th anniversary of the establishment of diplomatic relations as well as the 50th anniversary of Bangladesh’s Independence. To commemorate these historic events, both countries agreed to arrange appropriate celebrations highlighting their shared history, heritage, language, institutions, trade, development, and people to people links.
  3. The UK welcomed the re-appointment of Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina following the 2018 general election in Bangladesh and concerns raised by the UK government at the time, about the conduct of the elections, and noted actions taken by Bangladesh in this regard. Bangladesh welcomed Prime Minister Theresa May’s letter of felicitation to Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina, and the former’s commitment to work together as a steadfast partner in the humanitarian and diplomatic response towards the Rohingya crisis.
  4. The UK welcomed Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina’s anti-corruption drive and stressed the importance of a vibrant civil society and freedom of expression to promote good governance and accountable institutions. Both countries expressed their resolve to work closely to promote democracy, human rights, media freedom, political participation and pluralism for sustainable development.
  5. The UK briefed on political developments domestically and in Europe. Bangladesh briefed on political developments domestically and on relations with neighbours bilaterally and through regional frameworks. The UK stressed its desire to reach a broad and deep future relationship with the EU, whilst remaining outward looking, and committed to its global responsibilities, including as a champion of free trade, and seeking to further strengthen its relationship with close partners such as Bangladesh.
  6. Bangladesh stressed the importance of an efficient decision making process for UK visa applications for its nationals, particularly for students and businesses. The UK restated its commitment to maintain a high quality service for Bangladeshi nationals at the visa application centres in Dhaka and Sylhet and welcomed the increased volume of applications. Bangladesh also welcomed separate arrangements made by the UK at VFS, Bangladesh for facilitated visa applications by senior government officials and other dignitaries. The UK agreed to continue to maintain similar arrangements in future.
  7. The UK welcomed Bangladesh’s continued commitment to prevent irregular migration and take back its citizens who have exhausted all legal means to remain in the UK. The two sides agreed to establish bilateral returns Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs), between Bangladesh and the UK in line with the Bangladesh-EU Returns SOPs and also taking into account the existing arrangements between the Bangladesh High Commission London and the Home Office, following UK’s exit from the EU. The UK appreciated Bangladesh’s action to increase visits by its consular officers to UK prisons and removal centres, and its issuance of travel documents to those Bangladeshi nationals who had exhausted all legal recourse and no longer had any rights to remain in the UK.
  8. Both countries highlighted the valuable contribution that the Bangladeshi-British diaspora continues to make to British society and prosperity and welcomed efforts to create greater connectivity between the two countries including in the areas of business, trade, education, sports, culture, skill development and exchange of expertise and knowledge. Bangladesh highlighted concerns of the British curry industry, on the shortage of skilled workers and the proposed wage structure as part of the future immigration white paper, whilst recognising their significant contribution to the British economy.
  9. The UK reaffirmed its commitment to assisting Bangladeshi investigative, prosecuting, and judicial authorities in combatting crime, and highlighting the importance of human rights compliance, ensured that those accused of criminal offences are not able to escape justice by crossing national borders. Both countries agreed to deepen co-operation further in this important area, including Mutual Legal Assistance and extradition requests.
  10. The UK and Bangladesh agreed that the Cricket World Cup in the UK would provide a good platform to celebrate the strong cultural, sporting and people-to-people links that bind the two countries.
Economic & development co-operation
  1. The UK congratulated Bangladesh on the impressive socio-economic development achieved in recent years, including in the empowerment of women. Both sides recognised the importance of duty-free quota-free market access for Bangladesh’s socio-economic development.
  2. The UK, as the second largest foreign investor in Bangladesh, welcomed Bangladesh’s goal to improve its Investment Climate and Bangladesh’s ranking on the Global Ease of Doing Business index. The UK also welcomed the formation of the Bangladesh Investment Development Authority (BIDA) as the government’s principal investment promotion and facilitation agency. Both countries agreed to work together on efforts to encourage more Foreign Direct Investment, ensure appropriate regulations and practices, speed up processes and tackle issues over contract enforcement.
  3. The UK stressed that it remained committed to assisting Bangladesh’s economic and social development, noting that it was largest bilateral development partner of Bangladesh. It gave an update on UKAid plans/investments up to 2020 and how these aligned with the government of Bangladesh’s priorities. Both sides reiterated their commitment to improved aid effectiveness, effective development partnerships and enhanced transparency and accountability of foreign assistance.
  4. Both countries agreed to begin a dialogue on the future shape of their development partnership as Bangladesh moved towards and achieved middle income status. Bangladesh welcomed UK support in areas such as knowledge, innovation and skill development, enhanced co-operation between British and Bangladeshi universities, and the harnessing of the resources of the Blue Economy.
  5. Both countries noted that the Sustainable Development Goals represented a step change in the way that the global community tackles the global challenges of poverty and disease, mass migration, insecurity, climate change, inequality, and of maintaining peace, justice, strong institutions and gender equality. Both stressed their commitment to implementing the Goals both internationally and domestically and undertook to explore ways of working more closely together to achieve the implementation of the 2030 SDG Agenda. Both countries recognised the role that civil society can play in promoting stability and economic prosperity.
  6. Both countries highlighted the strength of educational and skills co-operation, welcoming the continued support to the Ministry of Education on systemic reform of the primary, secondary and skills education systems and more broadly on English throughout the school education system and to the Ministry of Cultural Affairs on the strategic positioning of public libraries in enabling a knowledge and skills based economy through greater access to information. It was agreed that the current Memorandum of Understanding concerning the activities of the British Council in Bangladesh should be revisited. Bangladesh requested additional annual Commonwealth, Chevening and other scholarships for its students to the UK. The UK side agreed to consider the request.
  7. Both sides underlined the importance of safe, regular and orderly migration. In this context Bangladesh requested the UK to work together on future modalities for overseas employment of skilled manpower from Bangladesh.
  8. UK appreciated the government of Bangladesh’s leadership on ‘Educating the Girl Child’ campaign and the empowerment of women initiatives. Both countries agreed on the importance of education for women and girls, in particular for 12 years of quality education, to build the country’s human capital, reduce child marriage, and increase girls’ life opportunities.
Regional issues
  1. The UK appreciated the fact that despite severe space and resource constraints Bangladesh is bearing a significant burden by hosting more than a million persecuted Rohingya from Myanmar and stressed the need for voluntary, safe, dignified and sustainable returns, with international oversight. The UK encouraged discussions on providing education and livelihood opportunities for the Rohingya and for host communities, as well as efforts to provide support to women and girls, including survivors of sexual and gender-based violence, highlighting the importance of creating more women’s safe spaces in the camps. Both countries acknowledged the need for planning ahead of the cyclone season to further improve conditions for all, including shelters and evacuation plans. Bangladesh thanked the UK government’s full support, commitment and sustained efforts to the Rohingya crisis, and looks forward towards the UK’s continued global leadership in international efforts to address all facets of the crisis, including accountability on the part of Myanmar for alleged atrocities committed against the Rohingyas.
  2. Bangladesh briefed the UK on the importance of regional connectivity in South Asia and the actions it has undertaken including the Bangladesh-Bhutan-India-Nepal (BBIN) motor vehicle and power initiative, and the Bay of Bengal Initiative for Multi-Sectoral Technical and Economic Cooperation (BIMSTEC), to promote trade, investment, tourism and regional prosperity and stability.
Global issues
  1. The UK and Bangladesh reiterated the importance of coordinated global action on climate change and reaffirmed their strong support for early and effective implementation of the Paris Agreement of 2015. They agreed to continue to work together on the Climate Resilience and Adaptation strand of the UN Secretary-General’s Climate Summit in September 2019.
  2. Both countries reaffirmed their support for the Commonwealth, delivery of the commitments made by leaders at the 2018 Heads of Government Meeting and the need to refresh the governance of the Secretariat so that it is in the best shape to address the challenges of the 21st century. Both countries highlighted their commitment to shared Commonwealth values including human rights, democracy, the rule of law, sustainable development, environment, gender equality and women’s empowerment, education and health, and international peace and security as set out in the Commonwealth Charter. The UK acknowledged Bangladesh’s commitment to protecting the oceans by tackling marine plastics via their membership of the Commonwealth Clean Oceans Alliance and Bangladesh proposed exploring opportunities for promoting the Blue Charter Initiative.
  3. Both countries affirmed their support for Global Compact on Migration and efforts to facilitate safe, orderly and regular migration and affirmed their support for a new, global, and co-ordinated approach to eliminate forced labour, modern forms of slavery and human trafficking.
  4. The UK appreciated Bangladesh’s role as a leading troop and police contributor in UN peacekeeping. Bangladesh appreciated the UK’s strong commitment to promote international peace and security through facilitating a number of peace negotiations and through active participation in the UN debates on peacekeeping and peace-building activities. Both sides agreed to further deepen collaboration in the UN on peacekeeping.
Security & defence co-operation
  1. As fellow Commonwealth members, the UK and Bangladesh stood in solidarity with and condemned the terrorist attacks in Sri Lanka and in New Zealand and expressed their deepest condolences to the victims, including citizens of each country who were killed. Both countries reiterated their commitment to the global community’s efforts to resist and counter international terrorist groups. They committed to continue and further strengthen bilateral co-operation in this regard, including sharing of best practice, and information in preventing radicalisation and xenophobia, and countering terrorism and violent extremism domestically, in line with the domestic and international laws and obligations, and with full compliance for human rights.
  2. Recalling the latest bilateral dialogue on Aviation Security held in London in March 2019, both countries welcomed the progress that had been made in aviation security in Bangladesh including at the Hazrat Shahjalal International Airport and recommitted to continue close co-operation in further strengthening aviation security especially in the areas of sharing of best practices, training and capacity building.
  3. Both countries expressed satisfaction at the continued growth in military-military ties, including in the fields of humanitarian assistance, maritime and counter-terrorism in accordance with international obligations. Both countries also stressed the importance of high level visits between the two defence forces. Bangladesh reiterated its earlier invite for the Chief of Defence Forces of UK to visit Bangladesh in 2019, while the UK side proposed to finalised dates in October/November 2019 for the proposed visit of Bangladesh Chief of Army Staff. Both expressed satisfaction at the procurement of C-130J aircrafts by Bangladesh as well as airframes to deliver a comprehensive capability to the Bangladesh Air Force. The UK further expressed its readiness to support Bangladesh with procurement of high calibre Multi Role Combat Aircraft alongside other modernisation programmes.
  4. Leaders of Bangladesh and the UK delegations expressed satisfaction at the productive discussions that took place at the third Bangladesh-UK Strategic Dialogue in a warm and friendly atmosphere, and agreed that the next Strategic Dialogue will be held in London in the first half of 2020.
 

UKBengali

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Uk ahead of China technologically? What a joke, most of their electronic imports are from China, they were even about to give Chinese Huwei 5g contracts until the Americans threatened them. China is far ahead of the UK in technology. I doubt you have any knowledge of military technology other than what you read online :D most American/European weapons use chips/semiconductors that are MADE IN CHINA, even a recent Pentagon report shed light to this.

EFT was developed in the 80s to face soviet threats. The JF17B3 was developed in the last few years for MODERN THREATS. From the AESA radar, to EW systems, to the Link 17 C3 system, the JF17B3 has more modern avionics that are atleast a decade or 2 ahead of the EFTs. These systems are used to primarily gather data and communicate the data to make INFORMED decisions based off of information.

Sure the EFT has superior engines and thus performance (Just as the SU30 does on paper), but you have to remember the side which has better C3I communications ie ground radars, AWAC radars, and synergy will have far more information and thus will be able to make better decisions in combat. The JF17 was built around this synergy similar to the Gripen.

Lastly having EFTs without any basic infrastructure such as ground radars, AWAC support, Arial refueling tankers, and support systems would be pretty useless. Making a jump from F7s/Mig29As to the EFT itself is a difficult challenge and will take a decade or more to have in place (training/support). Its much easier to make baseless claims on forums and fantasize than making it happen in reality.
Dude, I am going to go easy on you as you genuinely believe that post you just wrote.

UK is the only Tier 1 partner on the F-35 stealth fighter and the primary developer is Lockheed Martin with Northrop Grumman and BAe(UK) as the two primary contractors.

UK builds the F-35s entire electronic warfare system and that gives you an idea how capable the UK is in military electronics tech.

I know you want to big up the JF-17 Block 3 as Pakistan will be relying on this to keep India at bay but the latest EFTs will eat it for breakfast, lunch and dinner.
 

Yasser76

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Dude, I am going to go easy on you as you genuinely believe that post you just wrote.

UK is the only Tier 1 partner on the F-35 stealth fighter and the primary developer is Lockheed Martin with Northrop Grumman and BAe(UK) as the two primary contractors.

UK builds the F-35s entire electronic warfare system and that gives you an idea how capable the UK is in military electronics tech.

I know you want to big up the JF-17 Block 3 as Pakistan will be relying on this to keep India at bay but the latest EFTs will eat it for breakfast, lunch and dinner.
No one doubts the EF is in a different league to JF-17, they were supposed to be, JF-17 is successor to F-5/F-7 EF is successor to Tornado/Phantom.

UK is very capable but does not make planes on its own anymore, any EF export requires approval from all partners on the programme. So this may or may not be an issue. I would also go easy on the boasts as well, without EW, AEW and decent network capability, you are not having breakfast, lunch or dinner. Maybe a cup of tea at most.....
 

mb444

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No one doubts the EF is in a different league to JF-17, they were supposed to be, JF-17 is successor to F-5/F-7 EF is successor to Tornado/Phantom.

UK is very capable but does not make planes on its own anymore, any EF export requires approval from all partners on the programme. So this may or may not be an issue. I would also go easy on the boasts as well, without EW, AEW and decent network capability, you are not having breakfast, lunch or dinner. Maybe a cup of tea at most.....
Umm.... UK does not make planes anymore only holds if you assume USA does not builds jets either.

As has been mentioned F35 is a joint US-UK jet, prior to that UK lead on EFT, tornado, harrier.... the list goes on.

When has uk ever taken its foot off the throttle when it comes to cutting edge military tech.... do enlighten us.... i assume the tempest is a figment of our imagination.

EFTs are connected to each other, its PIRATE system can independently track 200 potential targets be that enemy aircrafts , missiles or whatever. Awacs will expand its capacity but its not necessary. It has onboard EW praetorian suite which is as advanced a system that any jet currently has.

EFT was designed to repel russian agression independently. No one is boasting here. If BD does end up getting EFT.... even with 16 jets IAF can be kept at bay however undoutedly its numerical superiority will overwhelm BAF eventually given current BD capacity.

However one hopes J10s will Pl15s will also be procured.

BAF with one Sqd of EFT, backed by i hope 2 sqd of J10 and the 8 updated migs gives reasonable BVR capacity. The smattering of F7s and the Yaks along with multi layered Sams also will provide reasonable point defense.

How many serious assets can IAF put up.... it in its current plan is only 36 raffles.... few of those can neutralise entire BAF now.... with EFT in BD air the calculation is materially different.

BD seeks to aquire defensive capacity.... it is marely 2 purchase away from this goal. BAF has been very poor in the last 2 decades but there are signs of real hope that we have not had for a long time.
 
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UKBengali

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Umm.... UK does not make planes anymore only holds if you assume USA does not builds jets either.

As has been mentioned F35 is a joint US-UK jet, prior to that UK lead on EFT, tornado, harrier.... the list goes on.

When has uk ever taken its foot off the throttle when it comes to cutting edge military tech.... do enlighten us.... i assume the tempest is a figment of our imagination.



No-one with basic knowledge of military aeropspace tech would think that a JF-17 Block 3 would have any chance against the latest EFTs.

For the price and being able to manufacture some parts and assemble the jets at home, with a reliable supplier like China, it is a very good investment for the PAF no doubt. It is in some ways comparable to Gripen E but I would still say the Gripen E is a more refined product with an edge in radar, avionics and network centric warfare.

However to send these against latest-gen EFTs would be a suicide mission for JF-17 pilots. EFT would have total BVR high-altitude aerodynamic advantage and would pick the time and place to engage the JF-17s with a far higher BVR missile load.
 

mb444

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No-one with basic knowledge of military aeropspace tech would think that a JF-17 Block 3 would have any chance against the latest EFTs.

For the price and being able to manufacture some parts and assemble the jets at home, with a reliable supplier like China, it is a very good investment for the PAF no doubt. It is in some ways comparable to Gripen E but I would still say the Gripen E is a more refined product with an edge in radar, avionics and network centric warfare.

However to send these against latest-gen EFTs would be a suicide mission for JF-17 pilots. EFT would have total BVR high-altitude aerodynamic advantage and would pick the time and place to engage the JF-17s with a far higher BVR missile load.

Flight of fancy comparing JF-17 to EFT. The former is a good fighter but they are they are fighter of different category.
 

mb444

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Uk ahead of China technologically? What a joke, most of their electronic imports are from China, they were even about to give Chinese Huwei 5g contracts until the Americans threatened them. China is far ahead of the UK in technology. I doubt you have any knowledge of military technology other than what you read online :D most American/European weapons use chips/semiconductors that are MADE IN CHINA, even a recent Pentagon report shed light to this.

EFT was developed in the 80s to face soviet threats. The JF17B3 was developed in the last few years for MODERN THREATS. From the AESA radar, to EW systems, to the Link 17 C3 system, the JF17B3 has more modern avionics that are atleast a decade or 2 ahead of the EFTs. These systems are used to primarily gather data and communicate the data to make INFORMED decisions based off of information.

Sure the EFT has superior engines and thus performance (Just as the SU30 does on paper), but you have to remember the side which has better C3I communications ie ground radars, AWAC radars, and synergy will have far more information and thus will be able to make better decisions in combat. The JF17 was built around this synergy similar to the Gripen.

Lastly having EFTs without any basic infrastructure such as ground radars, AWAC support, Arial refueling tankers, and support systems would be pretty useless. Making a jump from F7s/Mig29As to the EFT itself is a difficult challenge and will take a decade or more to have in place (training/support). Its much easier to make baseless claims on forums and fantasize than making it happen in reality.

China whilst improving in leaps and bounds, its purchase of SU35s is a clear indication that its tech has not achived maturity vis-a-vis Russian fighter tech let alone western tech.

In a decade it may be a different scenario... but not yet.
 

KaiserX

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China whilst improving in leaps and bounds, its purchase of SU35s is a clear indication that its tech has not achived maturity vis-a-vis Russian fighter tech let alone western tech.

In a decade it may be a different scenario... but not yet.
Shows your mental state... China bought the SU-35 a decade ago for 1 reason only and that is to get hands on its engines and learn from them to develop their own engines. Even NASA uses Russian engines for most of their space launched rockets. Every country has a certain nich... when it comes to China it is leaps and bounds ahead of the UK overall in technology.

Uk developing F35 with the US? what load of crap... 99% of the development was done in the US and costs bore by the US. It was made into an international program to outsource manufacturing (bring costs down) while increasing its sales many fold. Even after that the F35 is a complete failure of a program that is far over budget, crappy jet, even the US now is buying upgraded F15EXs due to the lack of capabilities of the F35.
 

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No-one with basic knowledge of military aeropspace tech would think that a JF-17 Block 3 would have any chance against the latest EFTs.

For the price and being able to manufacture some parts and assemble the jets at home, with a reliable supplier like China, it is a very good investment for the PAF no doubt. It is in some ways comparable to Gripen E but I would still say the Gripen E is a more refined product with an edge in radar, avionics and network centric warfare.

However to send these against latest-gen EFTs would be a suicide mission for JF-17 pilots. EFT would have total BVR high-altitude aerodynamic advantage and would pick the time and place to engage the JF-17s with a far higher BVR missile load.
you sound just likes the indians about there SU30mki before it was shot out the sky like a fly :D
 

Jobless Jack

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No-one with basic knowledge of military aeropspace tech would think that a JF-17 Block 3 would have any chance against the latest EFTs.

For the price and being able to manufacture some parts and assemble the jets at home, with a reliable supplier like China, it is a very good investment for the PAF no doubt. It is in some ways comparable to Gripen E but I would still say the Gripen E is a more refined product with an edge in radar, avionics and network centric warfare.

However to send these against latest-gen EFTs would be a suicide mission for JF-17 pilots. EFT would have total BVR high-altitude aerodynamic advantage and would pick the time and place to engage the JF-17s with a far higher BVR missile load.
Yes... but battles are rarely decided on Electronics alone. it completely depends on the situation where the EFT faces the JF17.

i give example . Suppose the EFT face the JF17 in Burmese sky where there is also burmese SAM is active. EF will be shot down. or its impact will be minimal that it wont affect the outcome of the battle.

It all depends on the tactics and battle conditions under which these EFT will be used. you are assuming that no external factors will effect a dog fight . It is not so.

This is why this purchase of EFT is important. so that BAF can formulate tactics to use 4.5 gen planes in optimum condition. No point buying 36-48 EFT without first developing the strategy and tactics that will benefit the BAF and compliment the EFT abilities. therefore this small paltry purchase of 16 EFT.

And yes , without early warning system, there is no point to EFT. If you want the most out of the beast called EFT, you need early warning system.
 
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KaiserX

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Yes... but battles are rarely decided on Electronics alone. it completely depends on the situation where the EFT faces the JF17.

i give example . Suppose the EFT face the JF17 in Burmese sky where there is also burmese SAM is active. EF will be shot down. or its impact will be minimal that it wont affect the outcome of the battle.

It all depends on the tactics and battle conditions under which these EFT will be used. you are assuming that no external factors will effect a dog fight . It is not so.

This is why this purchase of EFT is important. so that BAF can formulate tactics to use 4.5 gen planes in optimum condition. No point buying 36-48 EFT without first developing the strategy and tactics that will benefit the BAF and compliment the EFT abilities. therefore this small paltry purchase of 16 EFT.

And yes , without early warning system, there is no point to EFT. If you want the most out of the beast called EFT, you need early warning system.
He still wont get it.... but exactly spot on. I doubt the BAF would go for ETF. Would be a very illogical purchase. If a deal is signed today, with training, setting up the infrastructure alone just for the jets, by the time the first jets arrive is 7-10 years out at a minimum. That is not even including purchasing AWACS/Ground radars, formulating tactics, etc... By then 5th generation fighters would be the norm.

Youd be better off purchasing the Russian T-50 or Chinese J31 in larger numbers.

BAF could be keeping its options open in order to leverage a purchase from China or Russia. In that case it is a good idea to show that your negotiating and have options to get a better deal from the Chinese.
 

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