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Ban on sports with Israeli athletes removed from Iranian anti-Israel bill

Falcon29

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Ban on sports with Israeli athletes removed from Iranian anti-Israel bill

The motion concerning sports was removed after the Islamic Republic Minister of Sports and Youth Affairs urged members of the commission to drop the motion

Iranian lawmakers removed a motion banning Iranian athletes from competing with Israeli athletes from a list of anti-Israel measures presented by the Iranian parliament last week, according to Radio Farda.

The measures, presented in a bill featuring 14 articles, passed with 43 votes in favor and no votes against, according to the Iranian IRNA news agency. MPs chanted "down with Israel" after the bill was approved, according to the Hezbollah-affiliated Al-Manar news.

The motion concerning sports was removed after the Islamic Republic Minister of Sports and Youth Affairs urged members of the commission to drop the motion, according to Radio Farda.

In May 2019, Iran's National Olympic Committee (NOC) told the International Judo Federation (IJF) that it would allow Iranians to compete with athletes from all countries, including Israel. Iran was later suspended from competing in any future judo competitions after Iranian judoka Saeid Mollaei was instructed by the Iranian authorities and the Iran Judo Federation to avoid competing against Israeli judoka Sagi Muki.

The ban on Iranian judokas will only be lifted if Iran and Israel hold a friendly match.

The draft of the bill approved by lawmakers last week made it formally illegal for Iranians to hold any competitions or sports competitions, whether official or preparatory, with Israelis. Iranian sports federations will be obliged to impose any penalties that may be imposed on Iranian athletes due to this law.

MP Qassem Mirzaeiniko blasted the planned motion to ban athletes from competing with Israelis, saying "Probably, they are after closing down Iran's sports," according to Radio Farda.

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https://www.jpost.com/middle-east/b...-removed-from-iranian-anti-israel-bill-628433
 

Philosopher

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Good news if true. Sportsmen are not politicians, leave politics out of sports. Let your athletes bring glory to your nation by competing to their fullest extent, without hindrance. If you do not agree with another nation, having your athletes triumph over them on the international state will bring you more respect than just avoiding the competition. Even the propaganda value is much higher.
 

Falcon29

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I don't think Iranians as a people want to be anti-Israel. I think they have a lot in common with Jewish/Israeli people.
 

Big Tank

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I don't think Iranians as a people want to be anti-Israel. I think they have a lot in common with Jewish/Israeli people.
It doesn't work with what you "think".

Your "thinking" is based on the American Iranians. Every nation which gets American Social Security Number becomes similar with everything.

Let's take your example for a while.
 

Falcon29

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It doesn't work with what you "think".

Your "thinking" is based on the American Iranians. Every nation which gets American Social Security Number becomes similar with everything.

Let's take your example for a while.
This is good read for people of forum:

I was surprised by the cultural similarities between my Iranian family roots and Israel, common ground that could propel the peoples of both countries, if not their governments, toward building positive ties.

Perhaps it was the banter I overheard between Iranian carpet vendors in Jaffa, whose Persian accents had become distorted from years of speaking Hebrew. Possibly, it was when I stumbled across tourists of Iranian heritage discussing with an Israeli merchant - in an amusing Farsi-Hebrew hybrid - food terminology shared by each of their languages. At some point, though, the distinct delineation I anticipated between Iranian and Israeli cultures blurred.

Born and raised in Canada to Iranian parents, I never considered that my move to Israel would evoke a sense of cultural familiarity. Rather, I expected the customs of my upbringing to contrast sharply with those of Israelis.

Among the surfeit of headlines pitting Iran and Israel against one another, you won’t find many detailing the similarities between the two countries. Both Iran and Israel are non-Arab enclaves at the core of the Arab Orient that are accused by surrounding nations of usurping and occupying their lands. Their predominant religions - Shi'ite Islam and Judaism, respectively - further distinguish them from the surrounding sea of mainly Sunni-majority countries.

The commonalities of the two nations go far beyond those that arise when juxtaposing them with their neighbors.

Over the spring equinox, Iranians celebrate their new year, known as Nowruz. The Jewish springtime holiday of Purim, commemorating the deliverance of the Jewish people in the ancient Persian Empire from destruction, with the aid of the Persian King Xerxes (Ahasuerus), is popularly believed to have been adopted from Nowruz, a view which some historians share. Similarly, the Jewish holiday of Lag Ba'Omer, when Israel is peppered with celebratory bonfires, is mirrored by Iran's Chahārshanbe Suri, or Festival of Fire - the "day" commences at sunset in both Persian culture and in Judaism during these holidays. And while spring-cleaning is a custom in many cultures, the Iranians’ khooneh takouni, carried out in preparation for Nowruz, is matched with the traditional Jewish practice of cleaning one's home for Passover. The Seder plate that is displayed during the Passover seder traditionally holds six food items, each of which has a specific symbolic value in the context of the holiday meal. The Haft Sīn, displayed during Nowruz, is a table setting containing seven representative items, not all of them food, whose names begin with the letter sīn, or "s."

Israeli and Iranian cuisines share similarities that go beyond the typical common denominators of Middle Eastern diets. Both nations adore nana, or spearmint tea, and pickle any socially-acceptable food item. Jewish traders from Persia brought rice, an indispensable grain in Persian cuisine, to ancient Israel at the time of the Second Temple and from there it spread throughout other Middle Eastern countries. I was delighted to discover that "Israeli salad," that local staple of finely chopped tomatoes, cucumbers, parsley and onions, dressed in olive oil and lemon juice, is the exact same Salad Shirazi I find in the refrigerator of any Iranian relative.

It appears to me that both Israelis and Iranians identify with collective personality traits that are unique to each country, perhaps as a reaction to the perception of being threatened by surrounding enemies as well as a desire to distinguish themselves from their neighbors. Both the brusque Israeli frankness, known as dugri ("direct" in Arabic) and the Iranian social principle of taarof, a complex form of ritual politeness, perplex foreigners and are often interpreted, respectively, as rudeness and insincerity.

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https://www.haaretz.com/opinion/.premium-israelis-iranians-more-alike-than-they-think-1.5288850
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Hack-Hook

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I don't think Iranians as a people want to be anti-Israel. I think they have a lot in common with Jewish/Israeli people.
you knew Arabs and Israeli people are cousins not Iranian.
by the way I still wonder why we must support you guys after so many time you backstabbed us.
we don't forget the blood of our martyrs
 

Falcon29

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you knew Arabs and Israeli people are cousins not Iranian.
by the way I still wonder why we must support you guys after so many time you backstabbed us.
we don't forget the blood of our martyrs
Says who? You don't support me, but your country backstab whole Muslim world over and over again and we are not going to forget that. You can hide behind US, Russia, Israel and China and for time being, but they will not be there to help you forever.
 

Side-Winder

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@Side-Winder

I'm not allowed to criticized a political figure but these guys are allowed to openly throw insults around in every single post? Are you joking?
Please use the report button. Complain when your reports are not addressed in time. No need to mention the Mods here and there.
 

Falcon29

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Please use the report button. Complain when your reports are not addressed in time. No need to mention the Mods here and there.
I'm not worried about his insults and don't seek to report him, but I should be allowed to answer him in similar fashion without consequences if Iranian members can go around doing it to everyone.
 

Side-Winder

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I'm not worried about his insults and don't seek to report him, but I should be allowed to answer him in similar fashion without consequences if Iranian members can go around doing it to everyone.
That's not how it's gonna work dude. There is no need for Mods if members are to indulge in troll feasts violating forum rules.

it is advised to report an offensive post that you think violates forum rules instead of 'replying in kind' because you don't want to report.
 

Falcon29

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That's not how it's gonna work dude. There is no need for Mods if members are to indulge in troll feasts violating forum rules.

it is advised to report an offensive post that you think violates forum rules instead of 'replying in kind' because you don't want to report.
That it is how it works, Iranians get away with insulting, trolling and using sectarian tropes all the time. You got bothered by me for rejecting Khamenai. That's not grounds to give me a warning. You guys need to stop giving them preferential treatment if we are to have normal and civil discussions here. They are responsible for 95% of flaming/trolling/nationality insulting posts in the ME section.

I'll tell you now, I believe and am loyal to Allah and not the Shaytaan Khameni ....
 

Side-Winder

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That it is how it works, Iranians get away with insulting, trolling and using sectarian tropes all the time. You got bothered by me for rejecting Khamenai. That's not grounds to give me a warning. You guys need to stop giving them preferential treatment if we are to have normal and civil discussions here. They are responsible for 95% of flaming/trolling/nationality insulting posts in the ME section.

I'll tell you now, I believe and am loyal to Allah and not the Shaytaan Khameni ....
Again, Complain when your reports are not addressed in time.
I have already explained you the reason for warning in another thread. Now let's not detrail this thread, if you have so much of an issue. You can go to GHQ.
Period.
 

Mithridates

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This is good read for people of forum:

I was surprised by the cultural similarities between my Iranian family roots and Israel, common ground that could propel the peoples of both countries, if not their governments, toward building positive ties.

Perhaps it was the banter I overheard between Iranian carpet vendors in Jaffa, whose Persian accents had become distorted from years of speaking Hebrew. Possibly, it was when I stumbled across tourists of Iranian heritage discussing with an Israeli merchant - in an amusing Farsi-Hebrew hybrid - food terminology shared by each of their languages. At some point, though, the distinct delineation I anticipated between Iranian and Israeli cultures blurred.

Born and raised in Canada to Iranian parents, I never considered that my move to Israel would evoke a sense of cultural familiarity. Rather, I expected the customs of my upbringing to contrast sharply with those of Israelis.

Among the surfeit of headlines pitting Iran and Israel against one another, you won’t find many detailing the similarities between the two countries. Both Iran and Israel are non-Arab enclaves at the core of the Arab Orient that are accused by surrounding nations of usurping and occupying their lands. Their predominant religions - Shi'ite Islam and Judaism, respectively - further distinguish them from the surrounding sea of mainly Sunni-majority countries.

The commonalities of the two nations go far beyond those that arise when juxtaposing them with their neighbors.

Over the spring equinox, Iranians celebrate their new year, known as Nowruz. The Jewish springtime holiday of Purim, commemorating the deliverance of the Jewish people in the ancient Persian Empire from destruction, with the aid of the Persian King Xerxes (Ahasuerus), is popularly believed to have been adopted from Nowruz, a view which some historians share. Similarly, the Jewish holiday of Lag Ba'Omer, when Israel is peppered with celebratory bonfires, is mirrored by Iran's Chahārshanbe Suri, or Festival of Fire - the "day" commences at sunset in both Persian culture and in Judaism during these holidays. And while spring-cleaning is a custom in many cultures, the Iranians’ khooneh takouni, carried out in preparation for Nowruz, is matched with the traditional Jewish practice of cleaning one's home for Passover. The Seder plate that is displayed during the Passover seder traditionally holds six food items, each of which has a specific symbolic value in the context of the holiday meal. The Haft Sīn, displayed during Nowruz, is a table setting containing seven representative items, not all of them food, whose names begin with the letter sīn, or "s."

Israeli and Iranian cuisines share similarities that go beyond the typical common denominators of Middle Eastern diets. Both nations adore nana, or spearmint tea, and pickle any socially-acceptable food item. Jewish traders from Persia brought rice, an indispensable grain in Persian cuisine, to ancient Israel at the time of the Second Temple and from there it spread throughout other Middle Eastern countries. I was delighted to discover that "Israeli salad," that local staple of finely chopped tomatoes, cucumbers, parsley and onions, dressed in olive oil and lemon juice, is the exact same Salad Shirazi I find in the refrigerator of any Iranian relative.

It appears to me that both Israelis and Iranians identify with collective personality traits that are unique to each country, perhaps as a reaction to the perception of being threatened by surrounding enemies as well as a desire to distinguish themselves from their neighbors. Both the brusque Israeli frankness, known as dugri ("direct" in Arabic) and the Iranian social principle of taarof, a complex form of ritual politeness, perplex foreigners and are often interpreted, respectively, as rudeness and insincerity.

....
....
https://www.haaretz.com/opinion/.premium-israelis-iranians-more-alike-than-they-think-1.5288850
...
...
jews have a lot in common with almost any ethnicity in the world because they were living in Persia, Egypt, Europe, ottoman empire and Babylon. and BTW purim is a festival they celebrate killing Iranians it has nothing to do with nowruz.
 

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