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Bahrain to go on nationwide strike if government refuses to resign

Lankan Ranger

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Bahrain to go on nationwide strike if government refuses to resign

Protestors in Bahrain will stage more protests and a nationwide strike if the government refuses to resign on Thursday, an opposition activist told RIA Novosti.

The King of Bahrain agreed to withdraw troops from the streets of Manama and pardon political prisoners in a move to appease protestors. But he refused to dismiss the government and amend the constitution, the demands which many opposition activists see as a vital precondition for a nationwide dialog.

"We have set Thursday as deadline for the government to resign. And if it fails to resign on that day, we would expand the protest. If they ignore the call of the people, we will have to take further actions, including a nationwide strike to begin next week," the source said.

He did not disclose other details of the statement which the opposition leaders would make on Thursday evening if the government refuses to resign.

Protestors also expect that Hassan Musheima, one of Bahrain's most influential opposition leaders and head of the unregistered Haq Movement, will return from exile in Lebanon.

Thousands of mainly Shiite protestors have been camped out on Manama and other cities since January 14, demanding more political representation in the country, which is ruled by a Sunni Muslim monarchy. On Wednesday they were joined by thousands of opposition activists released from jails.



Bahrain to go on nationwide strike if government refuses to resign | World | RIA Novosti
 

jbond197

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What the heck is happening every where all of a sudden? People of so many countries suddenly became aware of all their problems at the same time. Sounds scary to me.. I believe these events will give rise to lot of conspiracy theories as well. God save the world!
 

Roybot

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Bahrain protests could very well be backed by Iran. Its another country where a Sunni family is leading a Shia Majority population, like Saddam in Iraq. Safavid Empire anyone?

All these protests are very well planned and orchestrated. And maybe Saudis knew about these, which explains the huge defence purchases that Saudi and UAE made recently.

:lol: I think its time to get out of the conspiracy theory mode.
 

cross1993

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Certainly not the USA to do that, you know why.
Also not China to do that, because the political turmoil is caused by rising oil prices, the Chinese govt will be inflation headache once again.
Only the EU is the winner.
 

KS

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OMG !! I have to leave my petrol guzzling Pulsar in home and start getting buses to my work. :frown:
 

Abii

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Bahrain protests could very well be backed by Iran. Its another country where a Sunni family is leading a Shia Majority population, like Saddam in Iraq. Safavid Empire anyone?

All these protests are very well planned and orchestrated. And maybe Saudis knew about these, which explains the huge defence purchases that Saudi and UAE made recently.

:lol: I think its time to get out of the conspiracy theory mode.
this place is filled with conspiracy theorists
Iran loves nothing more than a Shia ruled Bahrain but for the love of god, look at the facts before talking.

1) 7.5/10 people in Bahrain are shia

2) since the 1800s they have been ruled by sunnis

3) They may not join the military, govt, police etc... (talking about shias)

4) Pakistanis, Saudis and other sunni migrants are however allowed to join all the above instituitions and organizations solely because of their religion

5) Shia Bahrainis live in poverty where as sunnis live in a completely different world.


shias don't need Iran to tell them what to do. They already have enough reasons. Plus, they were part of Iran forever (until the 1800s) and the last thing they want is to go back under Iran's sphere of influence. Don't insult them by talking non sense.
 
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Roybot

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this place is filled with conspiracy theorists
Iran loves nothing more than a Shia ruled Bahrain but for the love of god, look at the facts before talking.

1) 7.5/10 people in Bahrain are shia

2) since the 1800s they have been ruled by sunnis

3) They may not join the military, govt, police etc... (talking about shias)

4) Pakistanis, Saudis and other sunni migrants are however allowed to join all the above instituitions and organizations solely because of their religion

5) Shia Bahrainis live in poverty where as sunnis live in a completely different world.

shias don't need Iran to tell them what to do. They already have enough reasons. Plus, they were part of Iran forever (until the 1800s) and the last thing they want is to go back under Iran's sphere of influence. Don't insult them by talking non sense.
Well what do you know, I actually agree with you on this issue. People should have the right to choose as to who they want as their leader. This is not 15th century that people need to be ruled by someone from "royal" family. I would love to see monarchy get abolished the world over. I hope people of Bahrain get what the majority wants. :cheers:
 

hembo

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Bahraini Opposition Leader Detained in Lebanon
February 24, 2011

An exiled Bahraini opposition leader who was pardoned by the country's king has been detained in Lebanon.

Lebanese officials said Thursday they are seeking legal documents related to the status of Hassan Meshaima. The Shi'ite activist, who is a leader of the Bahraini opposition group Haq, arrived in Lebanon on Tuesday. Earlier this week, he vowed to end his self-imposed exile in London and return to Bahrain.

Meshaima is among a group of about two dozen Shi'ite activists who were pardoned by King Hamad bin Isa al-Khalifa on Tuesday, along with several hundred prisoners. The activists were on trial for allegedly plotting against the Gulf state's minority Sunni rulers.

Meanwhile, the French News Agency (AFP) says hundreds of anti-government protesters marched from Manama's Pearl Square towards the central part of the capital on Thursday. The news agency said some demonstrators carried empty coffins in remembrance of protesters killed in earlier unrest.

Also, the top U.S. military officer arrived in Bahrain on Thursday for talks with the country's leaders. The visit is part of a regional tour by Admiral Mike Mullen.

On Wednesday, thousands of anti-government protesters were on the streets in Bahrain. Some cheered the government's decision to release the prisoners, including the Shi'ite activists. King Hamad's pardon was a gesture toward opposition activists who have been demanding the government's resignation and democratic reforms.


A Bahraini man in Manama passes by an image of Shiite leader Hassan Meshaima, crossed out with a paint roller by authorities, February 24, 2011
 

hembo

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Bahrain Formula One GP called off due to unrest
By Associated Press ,

MANAMA, Bahrain (AP) — The crown prince of Bahrain called off Formula One's season–opening race Monday, handing another victory to protesters aiming to break the ruling dynasty's stranglehold on power in the Gulf kingdom.

Crown Prince Salman bin Hamad Al Khalifa owns the rights to grand prix and serves as commander of the armed forces in an island country were at least eight protesters have been killed in a week of unrest. Angry protesters, who see the Bahrain GP as particularly meaningful to him, wanted the March 13 race dropped.

Facing more demonstrations around an event that draws a worldwide TV audience of around 100 million in 187 countries, the crown prince told F1 boss Bernie Ecclestone by telephone that the race would not go ahead.

"We felt it was important for the country to focus on immediate issues of national interest and leave the hosting of Bahrain's Formula One race to a later date," Bahrain's crown prince said in a statement.

After launching deadly attacks on protesters at a landmark in the capital city of Manama, the nation's security forces pulled back Saturday under international pressure and allowed demonstrators to occupy Pearl Square. The protesters have now established a tent city there.

"I am happy the Formula One canceled, but I will be happier when the government falls," said Mohamed Nimah, a demonstrator at the encampment. He said the race was a "good thing" for Bahrainis, bringing in "a good amount of money for us."

"But the government itself forced it to be canceled by refusing to give us our rights," Nimah said.

Saud Masud, chief executive of SM Advisory Group, a New York–based investment consultancy focused on the Gulf, said that scratching the March date will impact tourism in a nation of just 525,000 citizens, but the real effect "could be psychological." Bahrain also is a U.S. key ally in the Gulf, hosting the Navy's 5th Fleet.

The crown prince has been mandated by the king to lead talks between political factions and end the showdown between the country's Shiite majority and the Sunni rulers. So far, the protesters have shown little desire to meet with him.

Just short of an apology for the loss of life, Salman struck the most reconciliatory tone since the uprising began Feb. 14 in his statement on the race.

"After the events of the past week, our nation's priority is on overcoming tragedy, healing divisions and rediscovering the fabric that draws this country together," Salman said.

No new date has been set for the Bahrain GP that has been on the F1 calendar every year since 2004.

"It is sad that Bahrain has had to withdraw from the race, we wish the whole nation well as they begin to heal their country," Ecclestone said. "The hospitality and warmth of the people of Bahrain is a hallmark of the race there, as anyone who has been at a Bahrain Grand Prix will testify. We look forward to being back in Bahrain soon."

The F1 championship's next scheduled race is the Australian GP in Melbourne on March 27.

The Bahrain GP could be rescheduled later in the season, with speculation it could take place after the Abu Dhabi race on Nov. 13 if the season–finale in Brazil is moved from Nov. 27 into December.

Protesters said over the weekend that proceeding with the race would be an insult to the victims of the uprising and proof that the Sunni royal family, in power for 200 years, has not heard the demands of the Shiite population, which wants a larger share in the nation's decision–making process.

Last week, Ecclestone said he hoped the unrest "all blows away" and the race could still go ahead. But protests also forced the cancellation of a lower–tier GP2 Asia Series event over the weekend.

"It is clear that to race in Bahrain at this time would be inappropriate given the current circumstances," Williams F1 team chairman Adam Parr said.

Parr said final winter testing will now be held at Barcelona's Catalunya Circuit from March 8–11, instead of in Bahrain from March 3–6 as previously scheduled.

"The right decision was made, in light of what is going on, so we look forward to Melbourne instead," Red Bull driver Mark Webber said.

____

Associated Press (News - Alert) writers Rob Harris in London, Hadeel al–Shalchi in Manama and Adam Schreck in Dubai, United Arab Emirates contributed to this report.
 

hembo

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Bahrain says open to everything in national dialogue
MANAMA | Thu Feb 24, 2011 1:24pm EST

MANAMA Feb 24 (Reuters) - All issues can be brought to the table in a Bahraini national dialogue aimed at ending a standoff between the government and mainly Shi'ite protesters demanding an elected government, the foreign minister said on Thursday.

"Everything can be brought to the table," Foreign Minister Sheikh Khaled bin Ahmed al-Khalifa told Reuters in an interview, responding to questions over whether Bahrain would consider changes in its cabinet in response to protester demands. (Reporting by Frederik Richter; Writing by Cynthia Johnston; Editing by Reed Stevenson)
 

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