What's new

BAE Systems Delivers First Piece of Production Hardware for U.S. Navy's Advanced Gun

Metallic

SENIOR MEMBER
Jan 22, 2009
1,645
0
212
BAE Systems Delivers First Piece of Production Hardware for U.S. Navy's Advanced Gun System
UNITED STATES - 25 MAY 2010

ARLINGTON, Virginia - BAE Systems, along with partner General Dynamics Armament and Technical Products, delivered to the U.S. Navy the first automated magazine for the 155-mm Advanced Gun System (AGS) being developed for the DDG 1000 (Zumwalt) Destroyer Program.

The magazine is the first major production component to be delivered under the AGS program. It is one of a total of four magazines that will be built under a Navy contract to produce four AGS weapon systems for the Navy's first two Zumwalt class destroyers.

AGS is a long-range precision gun system designed to meet Navy surface fire support requirements. The 155-mm AGS magazine gives the AGS a fully automated ammunition handling system that eliminates the need for Sailors to handle the ammunition - a first for U.S. Navy large caliber gun systems. The magazine acts like an automated logistics center below deck by organizing and processing up to 38 pallets that each weigh 6,000-pounds and hold eight 230-pound, precision-guided Long-Range Land Attack Projectiles (LRLAP) and eight propelling charges. These LRLAPs can be fed into the AGS at rates of up to 10 rounds per minute to provide unmatched, sustained long-range precision fire support to Navy and Marine expeditionary forces.

"The successful factory testing and delivery of this first major production component for AGS, coupled with our ongoing successes with the 155-mm LRLAP program, demonstrates that this highly advanced system is a real, proven option for meeting unmet naval surface fire support requirements," said Jim Schoppenhorst, vice president and general manager of Armament Systems for BAE Systems. "The delivery of this magazine is another example of BAE Systems' commitment to providing our Navy customers with the fire support capability that best meets the needs of our Sailors and Marines."

This first 155-mm AGS magazine completed Factory Acceptance Tests in Cordova, Alabama, in March, demonstrating that all operations of the magazine functioned as designed. It was shipped from Cordova last month and arrived in Bath, Maine, May 10. It will be installed on the USS Zumwalt - the lead DDG 1000 ship - and later integrated with the first production AGS gun mount, which is currently undergoing testing in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

The largest fully automated magazine in the world, each AGS magazine is approximately 45 feet long, 30 feet wide, two stories tall and weighs 160 metric tons.

The advanced automation and massive capacity from these magazines give DDG 1000, with two AGSs each, the ability to fire LRLAP at ranges of more than 60 nautical miles. This represents the longest guided flight range for any large caliber gun system in the world.

The AGS can deliver munitions on target anywhere within minutes of a call for fire.

In addition to Cordova and Minneapolis, AGS production work is being done in Louisville, Kentucky.




Source: BAE Systems
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Metallic

SENIOR MEMBER
Jan 22, 2009
1,645
0
212
U.S. Navy Spends $640 Million on Shipboard EW System
UNITED STATES - 27 MAY 2010

NEWTOWN, Conn. | Over the next 10 years, the U.S. Navy will spend $640 million developing and purchasing upgrades for the SLQ-32 shipboard electronic warfare suite, according to a newly updated report from Forecast International. The SLQ-32 equips most warships in U.S. Navy inventory. In addition, the Navy intends to equip future warships, including the DDG-1000, with the SLQ-32.

The U.S. Navy has decided to upgrade the system in a spiral plan that includes four blocks. Each block will add capabilities such as electronic attack and infrared detection to the system, as well as improve the underlying technology behind the system.

General Dynamics was awarded the contract for Block 1 upgrades to the SLQ-32. Funding for Block 1 upgrades is expected to continue through 2012. Block 1 funding will begin to decline as funding for Block 2 begins to increase.
 

Metallic

SENIOR MEMBER
Jan 22, 2009
1,645
0
212
2nd Bow Sonar Dome for U.S. Navy Zumwalt Class
1 JUNE 2010

(June 1, 2010) -- Tods Defence Limited has completed the design and build of a second Bow Sonar Dome for the US Navy DDG Zumwalt Class 'stealth' Destroyer ship build programme. It is the first time that the US Navy has specified British designed Bow Sonar Domes, with the first dome being delivered late 2009.

The Bow Sonar Dome is a specialised composite materials underwater structural and acoustic enclosure which houses the ship's warfare sonar suite, and is a proven technology utilised on many Royal Navy and NATO navy vessels over a number of years. The latest US Navy dome is due to be shipped from Tods Defence production site, at Portland, UK. to the Bath Iron Works ship building yard of General Dynamics in June.

Steve Burton, Managing Director Tods Defence says: "We have received significant support from the US Navy Department of Defense and their integrated system suppliers Raytheon over the development of these Bow Sonar Domes for DDG1000 and DDG1001 vessels, which are the most sophisticated warships in the world. We have been awarded QA accolades for two successive years for this work, and we are confident this is just the start of a long relationship for future US ship build programmes"


Source: Tods Defence
 

Metallic

SENIOR MEMBER
Jan 22, 2009
1,645
0
212
Boeing Delivers 1st Set of Phased Array Antennas to Raytheon
UNITED STATES - 3 JUNE 2010

KENT, Wash., June 3, 2010 -- The Boeing Company [NYSE: BA] has delivered the first production set of phased array antennas for the U.S. Navy's Next Generation Zumwalt-class destroyers. The set was delivered March 9 to Raytheon Corp. [NYSE: RTN], the prime contractor for the Zumwalt program.

The phased array antennas will provide net-enabled operations through high-speed line-of-sight communications and data transported over a common data link (CDL) radio system between the Zumwalt-class ship and various airborne platforms. Unlike traditional antenna dishes, the CDL phased array antenna can be mounted flush to the ship's deck house, providing a low-profile system without sacrificing capability or range. In addition, the antennas are electronically steered with no moving parts, which improves performance and maintainability.

"Delivery of the first pair of production CDL phased array antennas highlights Boeing's abilities in the design, fabrication and testing of these antennas, which provide warfighters with critical line-of-sight technology," said John Lunardi, vice president, Boeing Networks and Communication Systems (NCS).

The CDL phased array antennas drew on technology from the Cooperative Antenna Development Program (CADP), funded by the U.S. National Reconnaissance Office and the Office of Naval Research. Boeing received its first CADP contract in 2002 to develop the antenna technology. Raytheon awarded Boeing a separate CDL phased array antenna development contract in 2005, and the current production contract in 2008. Boeing developed the antenna as a joint effort between NCS, part of Boeing Defense, Space & Security, and Boeing Research & Technology, a division of Boeing Engineering, Operations & Technology.


Source: The Boeing Company
 

no_name

ELITE MEMBER
Jan 25, 2010
3,530
0
1,910
In the last segment of video the test projectile is falling quite close to ship. It shows their confidence in its accuracy.
 

Metallic

SENIOR MEMBER
Jan 22, 2009
1,645
0
212
Bath Iron Works Awarded $105 Million for DDG 1001 and DDG 1002 Advanced Material Procurement and Support
UNITED STATES - 7 JULY 2010

The U. S. Navy has awarded Bath Iron Works, a subsidiary of General Dynamics (NYSE: GD), a $105.4 million modification to a previously awarded contract for procurement of long-lead-time material and engineering, production and support services associated with the construction of DDG 1001, and for long-lead-time material procurement associated with DDG 1002. The original contract was awarded in February 2008. Work encompassed by this modification is expected to be completed by February 2011.

Jeff Geiger, president of Bath Iron Works, said, “We see this award as yet another expression of the Navy’s confidence in our ability to efficiently construct and deliver all three ships of the Zumwalt class. We’re making good progress building the lead ship, DDG 1000, building momentum as we ramp up our construction efforts. This award will allow us to maintain progress on our DDG 1001 start-up and initiate timely procurement of key long-lead material items to support the DDG 1002 construction schedule.”

Bath Iron Works, a leader in surface combatant design and construction, employs approximately 5,700 people. Since 1991, BIW has manufactured and delivered 32-Arleigh Burke (DDG 51) class destroyers, the most technologically advanced surface combatant in the world, to the U.S. Navy. Two additional ships are currently under construction for delivery in 2011. In addition, BIW is the lead designer and builder for the U.S. Navy’s Zumwalt (DDG 1000) class program.


Source: General Dynamics
 

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Total: 1, Members: 0, Guests: 1)

Top