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Are the rumors of Tibet's substantial change of demography true?

Are the rumors of Tibet's substantial change of demography true?

  • Yes, Tibet's demography has changed considerably since 1950.

    Votes: 9 50.0%
  • No, there are only few non-Tibetan civilians residing there. Hence the demography is roughly the sam

    Votes: 4 22.2%
  • On the contrary, there's a law which strictly prohibits outsiders from taking property or job there.

    Votes: 5 27.8%

  • Total voters
    18

phancong

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Chinese have flooded into Tibet it's lots it's identity and it's culture.

But since you are a Chinese troll I doubt I can talk sense into you.
Since you also a troll you have no moral sense to lecture anyone about China destroy Tibet culture since you live in a country was created by bloody British invasion then subsequently destroyed the aboriginal culture and their population for you to call yourself a Australian.
 
Sep 12, 2017
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Since you also a troll you have no moral sense to lecture anyone about China destroy Tibet culture since you live in a country was created by bloody British invasion then subsequently destroyed the aboriginal culture and their population for you to call yourself a Australian.
lol I love it when Chinese and Indians get all defensive over simple facts.

They just sound like a broken record I guess trolls can't think straight.
 

phancong

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lol I love it when Chinese and Indians get all defensive over simple facts.

They just sound like a broken record I guess trolls can't think straight.
How it a broken record? We all knew how Australia as a nation came about, you can’t refute the fact majority Australia population are white and not the native aboriginal. Can aboriginal kick you out of their land and create a new nation base on them as the native to their land?
 

Adam WANG SHANGHAI MEGA

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If you ask the Aborigines if they would rather live under the Chines god Emperor or where if you are arrested by the Chines police you disappear only to have your organs harvested.

I know where the Aborigines would rather be.
be raped and slaughter ed by your white ancesters is am sure they like be slaughtered by white masters!
 
Sep 12, 2017
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be raped and slaughter ed by your white ancesters is am sure they like be slaughtered by white masters!
lol Keep going.

But the facts are the Chinese are raping, killing and committing cultural genocide in Tibet.

How it a broken record? We all knew how Australia as a nation came about, you can’t refute the fact majority Australia population are white and not the native aboriginal. Can aboriginal kick you out of their land and create a new nation base on them as the native to their land?
Not to late for the Tibetans to kick the Chinese out.
 

phancong

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lol Keep going.

But the facts are the Chinese are raping, killing and committing cultural genocide in Tibet.



Not to late for the Tibetans to kick the Chinese out.
Lol just like day aboriginal kick out all not native to their land that the day Chinese being kick out of Tibet.
 

Adam WANG SHANGHAI MEGA

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When the British occupied India, they also believed that the Indian culture was shit. Today, Indian culture still exists and develops.
In fact, you Indians do not care about Tibetan culture at all. Indians merely want to use Tibetan culture as an excuse, so that Indians can intervene in China’s sovereign affairs. If Tibetan culture is so good and why you Indians still believe in Hinduism, Indians should believe in Tibetan Buddhism; if Indians feel Tibetan life is difficult, Indians should cede the plains to Tibetans so that Tibetans can live a good life.
PS: Tibetan per capita GDP is 6,800 US dollars, India's per capita GDP is 1964 US dollars (2017)
 

jetray

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Be it self-introspection doubts like whether Indian space missions were real or hoax, indigenous or copied, be it enemy's weaknesses like change in Tibet's demography, be it the question of how useful ISI has really been to Pakistan, are we (me and my friend @Bharat Muslim ) the only ones who ask hard honest questions?

Anyways, is it true that Tibet's demography has changed substantially? If yes, what is the current ratio of Tibet's original inhabitants to alien settlers?
Seriously is that a question?
In Tibet & xinjiang natives will become minority. There is a massive govt program which is settling the hans out there.

http://www.asianews.it/news-en/Beij...-Lhasa:-Tibetans-risk-disappearing-33294.html
https://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/25/world/asia/25tibet.html
http://www.thetibetpost.com/en/news...increase-urban-population-in-tibet-30-by-2020
http://www.scmp.com/news/china/soci...ive-settle-new-wave-migrants-restive-xinjiang

100 years from now tibetian culture will be for the musuems or reservations
Fate of tibetans will become similar to like Indians celebrating Indus river.
 

beijingwalker

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Tibetan per capita GDP is 3 times of India's and it makes it the wealthiest place in that general region. They enjoy 15 years free education and health coverage. It's so funny to see a much poorer India worries a much wealthier neigbor.
 

Adam WANG SHANGHAI MEGA

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How British let one million Indians die in famine
By Dinyar PatelHistorian

  • 11 June 2016

Image copyrightALAMY
Image captionAntique print of Indian famine victims, 1885
It has been a difficult summer for India.

Drought and a searing heat wave have affected an astonishing 330 million people across the country.

But this summer also marks the 150th anniversary of a far more terrible and catastrophic climatic event: the Orissa famine of 1866.

Hardly anyone today knows about this famine. It elicits little mention in even the densest tomes on Indian history.

There will be few, if any, solemn commemorations. Yet the Orissa famine killed over a million people in eastern India.

Image captionFamine in India, 1900
In modern-day Orissa state, the worst hit region, one out of every three people perished, a mortality rate far more staggering than that caused by the Irish Potato Famine.

The Orissa famine also became an important turning point in India's political development, stimulating nationalist discussions on Indian poverty. Faint echoes of these debates still resonate today amid drought-relief efforts.

'No relief was the best relief'
Famine, while no stranger to the subcontinent, increased in frequency and deadliness with the advent of British colonial rule.

The East India Company helped kill off India's once-robust textile industries, pushing more and more people into agriculture. This, in turn, made the Indian economy much more dependent on the whims of seasonal monsoons.

One hundred and fifty years ago, as is the case with today's drought, a weak monsoon appeared as the first ill omen.

"It can, we fear, no longer be concealed that we are on the eve of a period of general scarcity," announced the Englishman, a Calcutta newspaper, in late 1865.

The Indian and British press carried reports of rising prices, dwindling grain reserves, and the desperation of peasants no longer able to afford rice.

All of this did little to stir the colonial administration into action. In the mid-19th Century, it was common economic wisdom that government intervention in famines was unnecessary and even harmful. The market would restore a proper balance. Any excess deaths, according to Malthusian principles, were nature's way of responding to overpopulation.

Image captionPhotograph of the 1900 famine in India
This logic had been used with devastating effect two decades beforehand in Ireland, where the government in Britain had, for the most part, decided that no relief was the best relief.

On a flying visit to Orissa in February 1866, Cecil Beadon, the colonial governor of Bengal (which then included Orissa), staked out a similar position. "Such visitations of providence as these no government can do much either to prevent or alleviate," he pronounced.

'Too late, too rotten'
Regulating the skyrocketing grain prices would risk tampering with the natural laws of economics. "If I were to attempt to do this," the governor said, "I should consider myself no better than a dacoit or thief." With that, Mr Beadon deserted his emaciated subjects in Orissa and returned to Kolkata (Calcutta) and busied himself with quashing privately funded relief efforts.

In May 1866, it was no longer easy to ignore the mounting catastrophe in Orissa. British administrators in Cuttack found their troops and police officers starving. The remaining inhabitants of Puri were carving out trenches in which to pile the dead. "For miles round you heard their yell for food," commented one observer.

As more chilling accounts trickled into Calcutta and London, Mr Beadon made a belated attempt to import rice into Orissa. It was, with cruel irony, hindered by an overabundant monsoon and flooding. Relief was too little, too late, too rotten. Orissans paid with their lives for bureaucratic foot-dragging.

For years, a rising generation of western-educated Indians had alleged that British rule was grossly impoverishing India. The Orissa famine served as eye-popping proof of this thesis. It prompted one early nationalist, Dadabhai Naoroji, to begin his lifelong investigations into Indian poverty.

Image captionUndated picture of Indian famine victims
As the famine abated in early 1867, Mr Naoroji sketched out the earliest version of his "drain theory"—the idea that Britain was enriching itself by literally sucking the lifeblood out of India.

"Security of life and property we have better in these times, no doubt," he conceded. "But the destruction of a million and a half lives in one famine is a strange illustration of the worth of the life and property thus secured."

Indifferent response
His point was simple. India had enough food supplies to feed the starving - why had the government instead let them die? While Orissans perished in droves in 1866, Mr Naoroji noted that India had actually exported over 200m pounds of rice to Britain. He discovered a similar pattern of mass exportation during other famine years. "Good God," Mr Naoroji declared, "when will this end?"

It did not end anytime soon. Famines recurred in 1869 and 1874. Between 1876 and 1878, during the Madras famine, anywhere from four to five million people perished after the viceroy, Lord Lytton, adopted a hands-off approach similar to that employed in Ireland and Orissa.

By 1901, Romesh Chunder Dutt, another leading nationalist, enumerated 10 mass famines since the 1860s, setting the total death toll at a whopping 15 million. Indians were now so poor - and the government so indifferent in its response - that, he stated, "every year of drought was a year of famine."

Image captionUndated picture of an Indian village in a famine-affected district
A wealthier, less agriculturally dependent India is now able to ensure that this does not happen. Significant problems remain: the Indian Supreme Court recently upbraided some state governments for their "ostrich-like attitude" towards the current drought.

For such reasons, it is all the more important to remember the Orissa Famine today. This humanitarian disaster, and the others that followed, galvanized Indians into fighting against British colonial rule.

Framing and implementing a robust national drought policy, as the Supreme Court has ordered, will be a fitting way to commemorate the million Indians who perished 150 years ago.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-india-36339524


150 million adult Indians suffer from mental disorder: NMHS

Sreemoyee Chatterjee| TNN | Oct 24, 2016, 21:14 IST


BENGALURU: 150 million Indians aged 18 and above and 7.3% of those aged 13 to 17 years of the total population are suffering from various mental disputes and are in need of mental care service, revealed National Mental Health Survey (NMHS) commissioned by Government of India and implemented and coordinated by National Institute of Mental Health and Neuro Sciences (NIMHANS), Bangalore.
A study on 40,000 adults and 1,200 adolescents from Tamil Nadu, Kerala, Gujarat, Rajasthan, Punjab, Uttar Pradesh, Madhya Pradesh, Chattisgarh, Jharkhand, West Bengal, Manipur and Assam revealed that Chattisgarh, West Bengal, Manipur and Assam are the worst hit states in terms of mental health burden. Karnataka stands at a better place with 8% of its population suffering from mental disorder, revealed NMHS, 2016.




Dr B N Gangadhar, director of NIMHANS, said: "The study has revealed that greater proportion of those affected are in the productive age group (30 to 49 years) or are elderly (above 60 years). Mental health problems are comparatively more in urban areas and those coming from low income and education groups are more likely to get mental disorders."




"The report also revealed that one in 10 had a common mental health problem like depression, anxiety disorders and substance use disorders with depression being the leading condition. Neurosis and stress related disorders like phobias and anxiety affected twice as many as women compared to men. Less than 2% had severe mental illness like psychoses or bipolar disorder out of which 50% had moderate to severe disability,' he added.
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NMHS showed alcohol disorder among 4.6% of men above 18 years, while illicit substance use disorders claim 0.6% of men.




Dr G Gururaj, senior professor and head of epidemiology, said: "Another major concern is the risk of suicide in India and data indicates that 0.9% is suicidal. Only one-fourth of those affected with mental ailment sought treatment and care from a formal healthcare provider. We should look into curbing the medical cost for mental service and opt for mental health insurance as the report indicated that the monthly median expenditure ranged from Rs 1,000 to Rs, 2,500 which are huge and unaffordable by most patients."
 

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