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Antibody neutralizing all Covid variants found, Chinese scientists claim

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Antibody neutralizing all Covid variants found, Chinese scientists claim

Chinese scientists claim to have isolated an antibody which can effectively neutralize all strains of Covid-19, referencing both lab experiments and those performed on a living organism.
In a study published on Tuesday, Chinese scientists from a variety of institutions, including Sun Yat-sen University in Guangzhou and Zhejiang University in Hangzhou, suggested that they may have the panacea to the Covid-19 pandemic.

The authors claim that monoclonal antibody 35B5 has been shown in both in vitro (laboratory or test-tube experiment) and in vivo (performed on living organism) studies to neutralize wild-type Covid-19 (without mutations) as well as variants of concern (VOCs). The in vivo tests were carried out on humanized mice.

The scientists noted that the antibody also works on the highly mutated Delta variant, which has been responsible for deadly waves of infection around the world since it first emerged in India earlier this year.

“35B5 neutralizes SARS-CoV-2 [Covid-19] by targeting a unique epitope [part of the antigen molecule which the antibody attaches itself to] that avoids the prevailing mutation sites,” the study explains. In other words, 35B5 targets a unique part of the virus that does not change during the mutation process.

By targeting part of the virus which is not impacted by the mutations identified in circulating VOCs, antibody 35B5 demonstrated capacity for “pan-neutralizing efficacy” across multiple strains. These findings, the scientists argue, could be “exploited for the rational design of a universal SARS-CoV-2 [Covid-19] vaccine.”

The part of the antigen targeted by antibody 35B5 is also present in the Omicron variant, the researchers note.

 

kuge

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Antibody neutralizing all Covid variants found, Chinese scientists claim

Chinese scientists claim to have isolated an antibody which can effectively neutralize all strains of Covid-19, referencing both lab experiments and those performed on a living organism.
In a study published on Tuesday, Chinese scientists from a variety of institutions, including Sun Yat-sen University in Guangzhou and Zhejiang University in Hangzhou, suggested that they may have the panacea to the Covid-19 pandemic.

The authors claim that monoclonal antibody 35B5 has been shown in both in vitro (laboratory or test-tube experiment) and in vivo (performed on living organism) studies to neutralize wild-type Covid-19 (without mutations) as well as variants of concern (VOCs). The in vivo tests were carried out on humanized mice.

The scientists noted that the antibody also works on the highly mutated Delta variant, which has been responsible for deadly waves of infection around the world since it first emerged in India earlier this year.

“35B5 neutralizes SARS-CoV-2 [Covid-19] by targeting a unique epitope [part of the antigen molecule which the antibody attaches itself to] that avoids the prevailing mutation sites,” the study explains. In other words, 35B5 targets a unique part of the virus that does not change during the mutation process.

By targeting part of the virus which is not impacted by the mutations identified in circulating VOCs, antibody 35B5 demonstrated capacity for “pan-neutralizing efficacy” across multiple strains. These findings, the scientists argue, could be “exploited for the rational design of a universal SARS-CoV-2 [Covid-19] vaccine.”

The part of the antigen targeted by antibody 35B5 is also present in the Omicron variant, the researchers note.

similar to the methods German scientists attempted few months ago in a report...Let's hope for the best
 

denel

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These are claims but as China's medical community knows, there are very strict protocols and testing to be done before it is qualified for use.
 

R Wing

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Could be great. Tough clinical trials ahead, but hoping for the best. Excellent work.
 

denel

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COVID is a parasite and can be easily cured by taking Ivermectin.
Dude.... come here. i will guarantee you with covid in a covid ward and then get my good friend to give you ivermetcim; he did clinical tests for past 5 months; he has struck it off. So... there you go from the field; if you want to try more quark medication, i will suggest you mampoer/witblitz - 90% alcohol.

It is a NO GO...... Parasite vs virus... you already demonstrate a complete failure to understand basic biology.

What high school did you attend if i may ask? Did you try cow piss; it also has anti-bacteria properties.
 

FairAndUnbiased

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These are claims but as China's medical community knows, there are very strict protocols and testing to be done before it is qualified for use.
If you read the original paper there have been tests done. It is uploaded to a preprint server so it means that peer reviewed publication is on the way.
 

SuvarnaTeja

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Is there data to support your claim?
Dude.... come here. i will guarantee you with covid in a covid ward and then get my good friend to give you ivermetcim; he did clinical tests for past 5 months; he has struck it off. So... there you go from the field; if you want to try more quark medication, i will suggest you mampoer/witblitz - 90% alcohol.

It is a NO GO...... Parasite vs virus... you already demonstrate a complete failure to understand basic biology.

What high school did you attend if i may ask? Did you try cow piss; it also has anti-bacteria properties.
I know the difference between a virus and a parasite but surprisingly anti-viral drugs are not working but anti-parasital drugs are working. So there is more to this story that is not being shared.



THERAPEUTIC ADVANCES
Ivermectin for Prevention and Treatment of COVID-19 Infection: A Systematic Review, Meta-analysis, and Trial Sequential Analysis to Inform Clinical Guidelines
Bryant, Andrew MSc1,*; Lawrie, Theresa A. MBBCh, PhD2; Dowswell, Therese PhD2; Fordham, Edmund J. PhD2; Mitchell, Scott MBChB, MRCS3; Hill, Sarah R. PhD1; Tham, Tony C. MD, FRCP4

Author Information
American Journal of Therapeutics: July/August 2021 - Volume 28 - Issue 4 - p e434-e460
doi: 10.1097/MJT.0000000000001402


Abstract
Background:
Repurposed medicines may have a role against the SARS-CoV-2 virus. The antiparasitic ivermectin, with antiviral and anti-inflammatory properties, has now been tested in numerous clinical trials.
Areas of uncertainty:
We assessed the efficacy of ivermectin treatment in reducing mortality, in secondary outcomes, and in chemoprophylaxis, among people with, or at high risk of, COVID-19 infection.
Data sources:
We searched bibliographic databases up to April 25, 2021. Two review authors sifted for studies, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias. Meta-analyses were conducted and certainty of the evidence was assessed using the GRADE approach and additionally in trial sequential analyses for mortality. Twenty-four randomized controlled trials involving 3406 participants met review inclusion.
Therapeutic Advances:
Meta-analysis of 15 trials found that ivermectin reduced risk of death compared with no ivermectin (average risk ratio 0.38, 95% confidence interval 0.19–0.73; n = 2438; I2 = 49%; moderate-certainty evidence). This result was confirmed in a trial sequential analysis using the same DerSimonian–Laird method that underpinned the unadjusted analysis. This was also robust against a trial sequential analysis using the Biggerstaff–Tweedie method. Low-certainty evidence found that ivermectin prophylaxis reduced COVID-19 infection by an average 86% (95% confidence interval 79%–91%). Secondary outcomes provided less certain evidence. Low-certainty evidence suggested that there may be no benefit with ivermectin for “need for mechanical ventilation,” whereas effect estimates for “improvement” and “deterioration” clearly favored ivermectin use. Severe adverse events were rare among treatment trials and evidence of no difference was assessed as low certainty. Evidence on other secondary outcomes was very low certainty.
Conclusions:
Moderate-certainty evidence finds that large reductions in COVID-19 deaths are possible using ivermectin. Using ivermectin early in the clinical course may reduce numbers progressing to severe disease. The apparent safety and low cost suggest that ivermectin is likely to have a significant impact on the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic globally.
 

Beny Karachun

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Low-certainty evidence found that ivermectin prophylaxis reduced COVID-19 infection by an average 86% (95% confidence interval 79%–91%).
Problem about taking it prophylactically is no one knows the real effective method, and side effects of taking Ivermectin routinely, forever, are unknown, and might not be good.
 

SuvarnaTeja

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Problem about taking it prophylactically is no one knows the real effective method, and side effects of taking Ivermectin routinely, forever, are unknown, and might not be good.
Ivermectin has been in use for a long time and has zero side effects. The main reason it is not being recommended is that Merck which created it no longer gets any royalty. Ivermectin is now available as a generic drug.
 

Beny Karachun

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Ivermectin has been in use for a long time and has zero side effects. The main reason it is not being recommended is that Merck which created it no longer gets any royalty. Ivermectin is now available as a generic drug.
Ivermectin was never used prophylactically.
It was used by people for a long time, but at low dosages and only once every 3-12 months.

Taking it prophylactically means taking it every day, or every two days. Effective dosage is still unknown. Side effects for higher and lower dosages at high frequencies is also unknown.
 

SuvarnaTeja

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Ivermectin was never used prophylactically.
It was used by people for a long time, but at low dosages and only once every 3-12 months.

Taking it prophylactically means taking it every day, or every two days. Effective dosage is still unknown. Side effects for higher and lower dosages at high frequencies is also unknown.
What is this then?


Advancing the repurposing of ivermectin for malaria
Open AccessPublished:March 13, 2019DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(18)32613-8


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There is ever-increasing anticipation for the potential of mass drug administration of endectocides (also known as systemic insecticides) to reduce malaria transmission, with ivermectin emerging as the most likely first-in-class endectocide.
1
More than half of the 46 papers published on this subject in the past decade appeared in the past 2 years. 23 projects are registered in the MESA Track database, of which seven are active today; and, more importantly, trial mapping by the Malaria Ivermectin Roadmap
2
shows that abundant new evidence on the topic will be available by 2020.
Why is there so much interest in repurposing ivermectin? After achieving remarkable advances from 2000 to 2015, the global fight against malaria has stalled.
3
Beyond funding and access gaps, residual transmission—driven by mosquito behavioural adaptations that allow avoidance of home-based insecticides—has become a key liability for vector control, and challenges achievement of the global goals set forth by WHO.
4
View related content for this article
Ivermectin lays the path for a whole new concept: drug-based vector control.
5
,
6
Ivermectin, or indeed any effective endectocide, could be administered to eligible members of the at-risk community as a complementary tool for vector control. It could be administered alone or in combination with partner drugs to allow for integrated management of malaria or neglected tropical diseases, directly responding to residual transmission by targeting malaria and some lymphatic filariasis vectors, regardless of their feeding behaviour.
7
,
8
In The Lancet, Brian Foy and colleagues
9
report the results of the RIMDAMAL trial, which enrolled participants from eight village clusters in a high-transmission area in southwestern Burkina Faso. Eligible village residents in the control and intervention groups received a single 150–200 μg/kg dose of ivermectin plus 400 mg of albendazole, but those in the intervention group received five additional 3-weekly doses of ivermectin alone, with mass drug administration coverage of 70–75% across the 18-week intervention period. The active case detection cohort comprised children aged 5 years or younger who were living in these villages. These children were visited three times every 2 weeks by a nurse who tested them for malaria, assessed symptoms, and provided treatment, if needed, allowing for monitoring of malaria incidence in this key age group. The primary outcome was cumulative malaria incidence (adjusted for sex and clustering), which was reduced in the intervention group (648 episodes among 327 children; 2·00 episodes per child) compared with the control group (647 episodes among 263 children; 2·49 episodes per child; risk ratio 0·81 [95% CI 0·72–0·90]; risk difference −0·49 [–0·79 to −0·21], p=0·0009).
Although the sample size was small and the regimen chosen for this trial (six doses over an 18-week period) might not have been optimal for implementation, these results provide the first evidence of an effect of mass ivermectin administration that goes beyond mosquito mortality, showing a measurable reduction in malaria incidence in children aged 5 years or younger, thereby demonstrating the concept of community effects. This trial continues to build the evidence base and, thus, increase interest in the repurposing of an existing drug that could help bridge to a more effective malaria strategy at a time when malaria progress is threatened, as shown by the increase in cases globally.
Ongoing or soon-to-start trials will assess the efficacy and safety of the new malaria indication of ivermectin with two different dosing regimens: either three consecutive daily doses of 300 μg/kg, as identified by the IVERMAL dose-ranging study,
10
which showed a good compromise between safety and the effects on mosquitoes; or a single-dose regimen of 400 μg/kg, currently used for control of lymphatic filariasis. Pharmacokinetic and modelling data support the evaluation of both regimens for the malaria indication. Ivermectin will be tested either alone or in combination with other drug-based strategies against malaria, delivered as seasonal malaria chemoprophylaxis or community mass drug administration.
Beyond the generation of evidence regarding safety and efficacy of ivermectin, the crucial next steps are determination of the best distribution approaches, identification of synergies in alliance with neglected tropical disease programmes, and ensuring a supply of the drug for campaigns at an affordable cost. Interested manufacturers must ultimately have their products prequalified by WHO to allow for the use of multilateral funds in the procurement process. The new malaria indication of ivermectin, combined with appropriate demand forecasting, could incentivise investment by manufacturers of generics.
Foy and colleagues' work
9
is an important step for a promising, preventive intervention for malaria. The development of this new tool will require clear epidemiological (ie, human disease) impact and coordination with the neglected tropical diseases community,
11
but the ultimate results could help us to get back on track to meet the global malaria goals.


 

Beny Karachun

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What is this then?


Advancing the repurposing of ivermectin for malaria
Open AccessPublished:March 13, 2019DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(18)32613-8

PlumX Metrics
Previous ArticleLaser trabeculoplasty as first-line glaucoma treatment

Next ArticleInterpregnancy interval after stillbirth: modifiable, but …
Request Your
Institutional Access
to the Lancet journal

Advertisement




There is ever-increasing anticipation for the potential of mass drug administration of endectocides (also known as systemic insecticides) to reduce malaria transmission, with ivermectin emerging as the most likely first-in-class endectocide.
1
More than half of the 46 papers published on this subject in the past decade appeared in the past 2 years. 23 projects are registered in the MESA Track database, of which seven are active today; and, more importantly, trial mapping by the Malaria Ivermectin Roadmap
2
shows that abundant new evidence on the topic will be available by 2020.
Why is there so much interest in repurposing ivermectin? After achieving remarkable advances from 2000 to 2015, the global fight against malaria has stalled.
3
Beyond funding and access gaps, residual transmission—driven by mosquito behavioural adaptations that allow avoidance of home-based insecticides—has become a key liability for vector control, and challenges achievement of the global goals set forth by WHO.
4
View related content for this article
Ivermectin lays the path for a whole new concept: drug-based vector control.
5
,
6
Ivermectin, or indeed any effective endectocide, could be administered to eligible members of the at-risk community as a complementary tool for vector control. It could be administered alone or in combination with partner drugs to allow for integrated management of malaria or neglected tropical diseases, directly responding to residual transmission by targeting malaria and some lymphatic filariasis vectors, regardless of their feeding behaviour.
7
,
8
In The Lancet, Brian Foy and colleagues
9
report the results of the RIMDAMAL trial, which enrolled participants from eight village clusters in a high-transmission area in southwestern Burkina Faso. Eligible village residents in the control and intervention groups received a single 150–200 μg/kg dose of ivermectin plus 400 mg of albendazole, but those in the intervention group received five additional 3-weekly doses of ivermectin alone, with mass drug administration coverage of 70–75% across the 18-week intervention period. The active case detection cohort comprised children aged 5 years or younger who were living in these villages. These children were visited three times every 2 weeks by a nurse who tested them for malaria, assessed symptoms, and provided treatment, if needed, allowing for monitoring of malaria incidence in this key age group. The primary outcome was cumulative malaria incidence (adjusted for sex and clustering), which was reduced in the intervention group (648 episodes among 327 children; 2·00 episodes per child) compared with the control group (647 episodes among 263 children; 2·49 episodes per child; risk ratio 0·81 [95% CI 0·72–0·90]; risk difference −0·49 [–0·79 to −0·21], p=0·0009).
Although the sample size was small and the regimen chosen for this trial (six doses over an 18-week period) might not have been optimal for implementation, these results provide the first evidence of an effect of mass ivermectin administration that goes beyond mosquito mortality, showing a measurable reduction in malaria incidence in children aged 5 years or younger, thereby demonstrating the concept of community effects. This trial continues to build the evidence base and, thus, increase interest in the repurposing of an existing drug that could help bridge to a more effective malaria strategy at a time when malaria progress is threatened, as shown by the increase in cases globally.
Ongoing or soon-to-start trials will assess the efficacy and safety of the new malaria indication of ivermectin with two different dosing regimens: either three consecutive daily doses of 300 μg/kg, as identified by the IVERMAL dose-ranging study,
10
which showed a good compromise between safety and the effects on mosquitoes; or a single-dose regimen of 400 μg/kg, currently used for control of lymphatic filariasis. Pharmacokinetic and modelling data support the evaluation of both regimens for the malaria indication. Ivermectin will be tested either alone or in combination with other drug-based strategies against malaria, delivered as seasonal malaria chemoprophylaxis or community mass drug administration.
Beyond the generation of evidence regarding safety and efficacy of ivermectin, the crucial next steps are determination of the best distribution approaches, identification of synergies in alliance with neglected tropical disease programmes, and ensuring a supply of the drug for campaigns at an affordable cost. Interested manufacturers must ultimately have their products prequalified by WHO to allow for the use of multilateral funds in the procurement process. The new malaria indication of ivermectin, combined with appropriate demand forecasting, could incentivise investment by manufacturers of generics.
Foy and colleagues' work
9
is an important step for a promising, preventive intervention for malaria. The development of this new tool will require clear epidemiological (ie, human disease) impact and coordination with the neglected tropical diseases community,
11
but the ultimate results could help us to get back on track to meet the global malaria goals.


I'm not saying it's fake or ineffective.
I'm saying long term side effects of taking Ivermectin frequently enough for prophylactic use are unknown.

Then again, one could argue no one knows the long term side effects of a vaccine.
 

SuvarnaTeja

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I'm not saying it's fake or ineffective.
I'm saying long term side effects of taking Ivermectin frequently enough for prophylactic use are unknown.

Then again, one could argue no one knows the long term side effects of a vaccine.
There are so many reported adverse affects of the vaccine that will make Ivermectin a safer bet for many.
 

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